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doctorchopper

wax or lube drive chain?

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What's the best product, chain wax or lube (sounds like woman talk) :) . I just cleaned my chain and switched to wax, The wax doesn't seem to make as much of a mess as it doesn't fling off. My main concern is does the wax penetrate enough and does it lube as well as the old spray oil?

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I used to be a dedicated chain wax guy. Might be because of my road oriented past. I have for the last few months been using synco/permatex super lube with teflon spray to lube my chain with great results. It penetrates well, & keeps the o-rings nice & pliable, & it doesn't collect sand & crud to make "grinding paste" like the chain wax that I had used before. I usually go to the car wash & power wash the bike after rides, & blast the hell out of the chain. when I get home, I'll put it on the stand & use a plastic bristle brush to scrub all 4 sides of the chain, & then lube it (along with all the other pivot parts, pegs, shifter, levers, etc.) with the super lube. Works great. :)

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If you have an Oring chain, brush clean, lub with non eating water displacement Oring lub and wipe off excess. Engine oil works ok.

Conventional chain, there are a lot of infos on this subject on TT.

As a matter of fact there are a lot of infos on both type of chains.

:)

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A follow up to this: while washing my bike I had a "concerned citizen" come watch me wash my bike and then went and told the owner of the car wash that I was washing oil down his drain! He saw me using a Grunge Brush to knock the mud off the chain. This jerk did not even know if I was using oil or wax! Man I hate tree huggers! I don't know which is better, but I think with o-ring chains when you lube them you are just lubing the o-ring and not the chain. With standard chains I think you are tring to lube the chain. Don't know for sure...

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Anyone who puts chain lube on an o-ring chain is just plain dumb.

There is NO way that lube can get past the o-rings unless they are damaged.

After I wash my bike I do an annoy-the-neighbors lap around the block and hit it with WD-40.

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Valvoline 10-40 is working for me, wash bike with simple green, scrub chain with soft nylon brush, ride around block ( to throw off water) the spin the tire on stand and soak that sucker with 10-40 valvoline or whatever your wifes car uses. :)

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I do not recommend the chain wax. It attracts way to much dirt that gets into the chain and makes it harder to clear itself. I strongly recommend the Ultra film product. Expensive but your chain will look like new all the time. Get the gallon jug and brush it on sparingly. See the following link for a dry lubricant developed for military weapons in the field. It will bond to the metal of the chain and never attract or cling on to dirt!:

http://www.best-motorcycle-chain-lube.com/ultra_film_chain_lube.htm

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i just started and really like using the Bell Ray superclean....try its clean and it appears to cover well

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I am a big fan of Bel Ray superclean. I have been using that for many years. Just cant beat the performance of the Ultra Film. But if price is an issue I would use Superclean! :)

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Anyone who puts chain lube on an o-ring chain is just plain dumb.

Gee... I guess my wife has been right all these years! I have a lot of dumb friends too.

Looks like I'll try something else this year. :)

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If nobody but us boneheads are using chain wax (as my Yam/Honda and KTM dealer recommended - same brand), then why are many using and recommending it -- is there any upside to it?

Elton

P.S. - I also do the lap around the hood after washing on Sunday; but have to do all five bikes -- I'm sure it annoys the natives :)

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My company builds machinery that uses chain by the 100 foot reels. My Tsbauki rep told me that chain lube is waste of time and only attracts dirt which wears out sprockets sooner. He told me that unless the o-ring is bad lube can not get past it.

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Doesn't WD 40 or motor oil also attract dirt???

I just end up scrubbing my chain no matter what I've used in the past. Never tried WD before, though.

Beez. - I hang out with dumb people to appear smart! :)

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I'm a idiot too.. I've been using Maxima chain wax forever. I hear it all the time that it's crap but it keeps making its way into my garage year after year some how. I've had zero problems with the product, thousands of race miles on stock Yamaha chains only using chain wax with no build up and not one chain failure. I wipe off my chain after washing with a towel and apply the stuff. You might think I'm waisting my money but it makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside and I love the smell... :)

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Thats OK Dan I know CRF owners that put 2 stroke oil in the gas.

I don't even try to appear smart anymore, its hopeless.

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If you use a penetrating dry-film type lube, you may want to check and see how many lubes you get compared to a wax before you worry about price. I think you'll find that a dry-film lube will go MUCH further than any sort of petroleum lube in a spray can.

On a standard chain, wax tends to not let what little lubricant there is into the places it's needed. It can actually set up prior to the lube getting to where its needed, and blocks the area off.

Wax also is also one of the best dirt and grit attractors there is, which can be the enemy of a ring chain.

Before we call someone "dumb" for lubing a ring chain, we need to first understand who has the clues and who doesn't. The chain rep that tells you to not lube a ring chain is the one who is dumb. Or he thinks you are, and wants you to buy chain again sooner.

Only the pin/bushing area of a ring chain is protected by rings. The roller/bushing area still needs lubrication, as does the roller/sprocket working face. Also, the rings need proper lubrication to keep them supple and performing their job.

Chain wax is one of the biggest abortions the lube world has ever created, and is probably the absolute worst way to address the problems that are encountered with our sport and the lubrication of our chains.

Lubrication technology has went lightyears past the technology being used by most every popular brand of chain lube there is. There are very few chain lube mfg's that have reformulated over the years to keep up with the latest technology's...they simply spend money on fancier cans and tat wearing poseurs trying to convince you that their old fashioned wax crap is the bomb.

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I think you'll find that a dry-film lube will go MUCH further than any sort of petroleum lube in a spray can.

Chain wax is one of the biggest abortions the lube world has ever created, and is probably the absolute worst way to address the problems that are encountered with our sport and the lubrication of our chains.

Lubrication technology has went lightyears past the technology being used by most every popular brand of chain lube there is.

Thank you for putting it so elequently! :):p:D

I was not able to get the point across as well. :D

I love your Ultra film product! :o I think I might be over applying it. It is hard not to brush it on thick! : :)

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I use gear oil. EP90 in the winter and 140 in the summer if I can get it. The routine I use is after each ride (about 160KMs) clean the chain with soap and water using a stiff nylon brush. Pay attention to the sides as well as the running surfaces. Dry thoroughly with a clean dry rag. Apply the oil with a rag and rub it in to each and every roller from the inside if the chain. Make sure the sides are done as well to prevent rusting.

Apparently the theory is the oil stays on the chain until it is contaminated with dust, grit, sand or whatever. It then is to heavy to stick and is flung off taking the potentially abrasive component with it.

Works for me. I have about 4500kms on the bike now and the chain has been adjusted just 4 or 5 times with no signs of hooking on either sprocket. And before someone out there says I ride like a wimp I am about to change to rear tyre number 6!

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