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Math

Zipty magnetic drain plug. Am I the only one who

16 posts in this topic

Am I the only one who thinks that the stir(r?)ing effect of the tranny is probably too stong for any kind of mag drain plug to really do its job? I mean, how can the metal particles remain attached to that mag drain plug when the gears are revving full speed in there :) ?

What do you think? I think the idea to restrain the particles from going everywhere by magnetic action is good :D but how strong the magnetic force really has to be for such an idea to become efficient :) ?

I probably need some explanations.... as always :D

Thanks guys :p

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I am a maintenance freak. I am heckled frequently by my friends about my bike being clean before I ever get it home after a ride. All in all, I take it as a compliment. Now that you understand who you are dealing with, I bought the moose magnetic drain plug and the zip ty magnetic drain plug. I liked the zip ty better and gave the moose to a friend of mine. After the first oil change, there was plenty of crud on the magnet. Magnets work in this appliaction quite well. Have you ever owned a Honda vehicle? Try to find the transmission filter. There isn't one. Atleast not in any of the ones that I have owned. They have a very strong magnetic drain plug, and that's it. I currently have all Yamaha motorcycles, but that is more of a business decision that I have made concerning the local dealerships. I have owned Honda motorcycles, four wheelers, generators, mowers, suv's, and cars. They have all performed very well. I can ask nothing more of them. Honda's reliability and durability are world renowned. If it works for Honda so well, it may just be a suitable idea. I took college physics a long time ago, and can't recall the scientific calculations for the magntic force of a particulare type and size of magnet, but I can tell you that they are stronger than the average Joe may think. We are all the victims/victors of our choices, I made my choice. Now you can make yours.

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Ya.... I too was a little concerned, and a bit miffed when I went to install mine and realized that it went into the case and not the frame reservoir.

Then common sense and logic overcame me and I realized that putting a mag plug in the frame would only serve to magnetize the entire frame area near the plug, and that the plug MUST be installed into a non-ferrous housing.

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It doesnt hurt anything, Right? I am thinking of getting one just because it is a small investment and could save real damage. If it has no down side other than the initial purchase price then I'm in. Any help here would be great, thanks.

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I changed my oil yesterday for the first time after installing the Zip-Ty magnetic drain plug. The tip was covered with small metal shavings, so I figured it must be doing it's job. Now were these shavings attached to the plug the whole time I was riding, or did they attach themselves after I shut the bike down, no one will ever know.

The plug gives me peace-of-mind, and that's enough for me.

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The tip was covered with small metal shavings... ... Now were these shavings attached to the plug the whole time I was riding, or did they attach themselves after I shut the bike down...

Now that is the question isn't it?.. That's exactly what my concern is about. How can someone know it really works?

I think I will e-mail Mitch at ZipTy with this question. I'm curious to know if the question has been addressed before (probably it has...)

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maybe the plug just collected them after the engine quit running , instead of letting them hide in a little corner somewhere where they wouldn't come out when you changed your oil , only to be reintroduced to your engine on your next start up.

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I'd say the important thing is, that at the end of the day, the stuff that was on your drainplug isn't in your engine anymore. IIRC, someone on here mentioned, you can go to the hardware store & buy some rare earth magnets for a buck or two, drill your OEM drainplug & epoxy the magnet in. Either way, $15 is cheap insurance... Yep, you guessed it, I bought the Zip-ty plug too.

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Magnetic drain plugs do work, they will hold the magnetic particles while the bike is running. There is not much oil pressure in the gearbox, more circulation than flow. just to prove the plug theory, next time you change your oil and have particles on the plug, run it under your sink tap and see if you can wash off the metal particles, even compressed air won't blow all of the off, unless you put the air an inch away from the plug. We run the mag plugs in helicopters for around 40 years now which have proved themselves over and over. They are not only there to keep the mag particles out of the oil system but also to let you know that you are about to have a major engine failure depending on the size of particles.l

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Mine picked up some crud but no shavings. My 93 Toyota had magnetic plugs in the oil and differentials. Although, it took a few years of oil changes to notice because I did not expect it. One oil change I noticed crud at the end of the oil plug and cleanded it. Wow, a magnet!

I would be afraid to drill out the standard plug and epoxy a magnet. What if the magnet comes out? Epoxy does not seem flexible when the metals expand and contract from heat.

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The tip was covered with small metal shavings, so I figured it must be doing it's job.

Where are they shavings coming from? Is this normal? :)

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No matter how good of oil there is, there will always be wear from metal to metal contact in bearings and gears. Really fine "fuzz" is very normal, a shaving however, is a not-so-good sign. I work on heavy equipment and most drain plugs do have magnetic tips to collect particles. If you change the oil on your bike regularly, and you have a magnetic drain plug, your chances of becoming aware that a problem is arising are much greater. This will help keep that problem from becoming a catastrophe! I changed my oil on my bike after breakin at 100 miles. I cut the oil filter up and sqeezed out the oil in a vise like we do on the equipment I work on. I about sheeit my pants when I saw the shavings in the pleats! My buddy at work said he did the same and called the dealerships service dept. because it looked just like mine and they told him that is normal for break-in but that it should not look like that at his next oil change. I am now at 211 miles and am gonna change my oil again because of the conditions I rode in between 100 and 200 miles. I will be cutting the filter again and I am praying that it will not look the same or anywhere close to it. I installed the magnetic drain plug at 200 miles and rode for about an hour (11 miles) with it in. I hope I don't have ANY shavings on it, but fuzz won't bother me a bit. I'll post here with what I find soon.

peace

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As far as the oil screen goes; I looked at the sevice manual, and Yamaha recommends inspecting it every 600 miles or fifth race. I have 60 miles on my bike, and have changed the oil twice. There were several shaving in the filter and fuzz on the magnetic drain bolt. What I don't understand, is why my oil looks so dark when I change it. I use the best oil that I know of (we all have of favorite) which is Motul 300V. It is a pure ester based synthetic, no petroleum base at all. In my rode bike, it comes out looking just like it did when I put it in. When it comes out of the wr, it looks as if it is black/gray. One guy at the local bike shop said he thought that it was coming from blow by, due to my not using a dino oil long enough in the break in process. He recommended that I go back to some plain old oil, for about 40 miles and see what happens. I am far from being a mechanic, because I lack wrenching knowledge. I do know for a fact that the better you maintain your equipment, the longer it will last, and the fewer problems that you will have.

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...What I don't understand, is why my oil looks so dark when I change it. I use the best oil that I know of (we all have of favorite) which is Motul 300V. It is a pure ester based synthetic, no petroleum base at all. In my rode bike, it comes out looking just like it did when I put it in. When it comes out of the wr, it looks as if it is black/gray...

I'd say that the reason your WR's oil comes out blacker than your road bike's is because of volume. Your WR uses just over 1 quart of oil, & that oil has to lube your whole engine & transmission. The amount of contaminants from the clutch alone are probably enough to significantly darken your oil. Now if you consider that your road bike probably uses somewhere between 2.5-4 quarts of oil to do the same work (the road bikes engine might be bigger, but the clutches are probably very similar in size) it stands to reason that it should be noticeably cleaner when drained, given that it's mechanically sound.

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