99 yz400f

Alright wanted to get yall's opions.... I can snag a 1999 YZ400F for 1800. It has acerbis handguards, fork savers, acerbis fork guards, aftermarket allow sprocket, o ring chain, radiator guards, easy pull aftermarket clutch, sticker kit on it, acerbis frame guards and aftermarket kick stand. It's basically set up for woods. The guy has only ridden it about twice in the last year he said. It started up about four kicks cold and ran great. He said he changed oil after about every 2 to 3 rides. It looks SICK. What do you guys think? Good deal? Is it a good bike? Does any one have any experience with this bike?

Alright wanted to get yall's opions.... I can snag a 1999 YZ400F for 1800. It has acerbis handguards, fork savers, acerbis fork guards, aftermarket allow sprocket, o ring chain, radiator guards, easy pull aftermarket clutch, sticker kit on it, acerbis frame guards and aftermarket kick stand. It's basically set up for woods. The guy has only ridden it about twice in the last year he said. It started up about four kicks cold and ran great. He said he changed oil after about every 2 to 3 rides. It looks SICK. What do you guys think? Good deal? Is it a good bike? Does any one have any experience with this bike?

Ive got one. They are solid bikes. Heavier than the new ones but good bikes. $1800 dosn't sound too bad a price. Ask him if it has had new rings, timing chain, and valves shimed. If none of this stuff has been done it will need to be done. Lots of folk a year or so back have had timing chains stretch and jump timing causing all kinds of troubles on the 99 yz400's (including me) so if it hasn't had a new chain in it it will need one. Its cheep and pretty easy to do yourself.

I have one I bought in 2003. Great bike and I ride it hard. I bought it from a guy who ran it in the Nationals. It has the 426 kit. I have added a Baja kit, lowered the gearing and added the WR flywheel. I use it for woods and trails. I also ride it on Motocross tracks, but I have had the suspension re-done and slightly lowered for my size and for trail riding, so I stay away from jumps.

I do spend a lot of time on maintenance. I change oil and filter every 10 hours and clean / oil the filter after most every ride. I get about 45 to 50 hours out of steel sprockets and gold chain but I do a lot of mud / sand riding. Am just installing the Ironman sprockets and X-ring chain to see how good they work.

I would highly recommend the bike if it is in good shape.

I have this bike too, and its amazing, never had a problem with it ive owned mine for 2 years now........reg oil changes, valve clearance checks...etc.......

i was reading all about the timing chain breaks/skipping and when i was checking my valve clearances i inspected the sprockets and chain in their and i don't see any visible signs of wear on sprocket or chain? what am i looking for that is a sign of wear?? looks fine to me........i don't know if it was ever replaced before i bought it ??

is it a pain in the ass to replace? can i do this myself, i have the engine out of frame and top cover off already.........does anyone have a step by step to replacing the chain, i find the book is never good enough...

I did go price one out at the local yamaha shop here, guy told me 100bucks(CND) for new timing chain...i read on here you guys said it was like 20 bucks(USD) or so.....

The chain is around $20. Check to see if that was a parts and labor quote. If so, it's pretty fair.

To replace it, you will need a flywheel puller. Get one; they're only about $10, and they fit almost everything from Japan except some later WR's. You need access to the cam box and the ignition cover needs to come off, so whatever must be removed to accomplish that must be gotten out of the way.

Then place the engine at TDC with the timing marks on the cams up, remove the chain tensioner, and remove the exhaust cam (if you remove it, you may be able to work the chain off of the intake cam without removing it. The exhaust cam is more crowded). Pull the flywheel, remove the stator (mine requires a #27 Torx bit, not sure about the 400) and remove the two bolts from the bottom of the tensioner shoe. Lower the chain far enough to work it over the crank nose, and put the new one in its place.

Check the crank sprocket for serious wear. This is where an old chain will do its damage, and the sprocket is part of the crank, not replaceable, so you don't want it to get chewed up. Be careful that the chain is drawn up and fully engaged on the sprocket as you replace the tensioner shoe and close up the ignition. It's designed to prevent looping any slack chain under the sprocket once it's assembled, but you shouldn't encourage machinery to misbehave, either. :)

It's really pretty easy. :)

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