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Lindsay90

Chain Slack

18 posts in this topic

The high dollar chain Yamaha used on my bike is stretching so I went to tighten it up but noticed the spacer marks to know your tire is straight is diffrent on the other side. Lets say one side says three marks and the other side will say five. I went to look at other yamahas at the dealer and also found some this way. Is this the way some are made :cry:

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I noticed the same thing with mine. First of all, the stock chain is cheap. Second of all, don't go by the notches on the swingarm, I use the side of the rim as a reference point and measure to the side of the swingarm and make it equal on both sides.

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The sprocket side shows two less than the brake side. So if it is 5 on the brake side it would be three on the sprocket side. Enough said.

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Hold the edge of a yardstick flat on the side of the rear sprocket and line up the straight edge to your front sprocket.

Much more accurate than expensive axle blocks, arbitrary swingarm marks, or any other method I've devised.

Dirty

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You girls need to lay off the sauce. Buy after market blocks or go and perches a Honda. :cry::cry::cry:

Yeah, well you should go back to elementary and learn how to spell!! Oh and if I want valve problems and breaking cylinder skirts I'll go buy a honda!

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PLEASE! PLEASE!!! Don't mention the "V" word...that why I'm coming back to the Yama :cry: .

696

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While you're in the upgrade catalog for the 05 crf, don't forget to add stiffer springs in the front forks :cry:

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Never use tick marks to align your sprockets. As Dirty Sanchez stated, always use a straight edge from sprocket to sprocket, if you want your alignment to be correct. This is on ANY bike or brand, bar none.

You can't trust the adjusting marks, nor can you trust measuring to the swingarm or any other stationary point. It just isn't precise enough.

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I thought the same thing. but if you look at how the blocks are marked you will see that you are supposed to count from the back to front. That should just about line it up. You can do other things but this seems to work perfect. try that and it should line up. oops is what you say.

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Can someone please elaborate on how to do what Dirty Sanchez recommended?

Am I to assume that I am to use 2 measurements: One measurement from the front/leading edge of the rear sprocket to the swingarm center? And the second measurement from the trailing edge of the rear sprocket to the center of the swingarm? And how or where do I align up the front sprocket with these dimensions? Sorry for being :)

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tnl,

What you want is for the front and rear sprockets to be in the very same plane as one another. Using a straight edge, lay it accross the face of the rear sprocket. You should be able to extend the straight edge out until it is also at the face of the front sprocket. The two faces of the sprockets need to be exactly on that straight edge if the rear is aligned properly.

You could simply get behind the bike and "eyeball" down the rear sprocket aligning sight with the front, to see if they are aligned. Problem is that most folks can't eyeball close enough. Thats why we use a straight edge (a yardstick, a broom handle, or any ridgid piece of metal that is straight).

This link may be of some help:

http://www.best-motorcycle-chain-lube.com/sprocket_maintenance.htm

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The high dollar chain Yamaha used on my bike is stretching so I went to tighten it up but noticed the spacer marks to know your tire is straight is diffrent on the other side. Lets say one side says three marks and the other side will say five. I went to look at other yamahas at the dealer and also found some this way. Is this the way some are made :)

The best way to aligh your chain is by eye balling the Teeth to run directly up the middle of your chain.

Keep the Axle slightly snugg enough to hold all n place

By spinning the rear tire as you adjust the Chain you will notice the gap on each side of the teeth shrink or grow. The Objective is to get that gap even

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You girls need to lay off the sauce. Buy after market blocks or go and perches a Honda. :):):p

And this is coming from a person who pees in pools, and can't spell? I think I will stick with a Yamaha.

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