XR650 Fork and Shock Springs

Just curious if any 230 lb. riders have used 0.50 Kg front and 11.0 Kg rear springs on their XR650 and found if the suspension was too stiff or just right?

Both my brother-in-law and I have 2002 XR650's and ride desert. I weigh 200 lbs. (215-220 lbs. with gear). Rob Barnum setup my suspension with 0.45 and 10.0 springs, 5 wt. oil, and revalved according. It feels great. Maybe just a bit soft at times, but too difficult to tell.

My brother-in-law weighs 230 lbs. (245-250 lbs. with gear). His suspension is stock. I offered to respring his bike and change the fork oil to 2.5 wt. as I've read many positive posts about using 2.5 wt. fork oil. I called Lindemann Engineering to order the springs since I've seen many positive posts regarding Lindemann Engineering. Based on a 230 lb. rider, they sold me 0.50 front springs and a 11.0 rear spring. I said "well....OK, I guess". Doesn't 0.50 springs sound a bit stiff for the front? I thought they would have suggested 0.47's. I asked them about 0.47's and they said they're out of stock (hmmm). They said they've been selling 0.50 springs to the guys with CRF450's and they thought they should work well on a XR650.

.50 kg fronts sound like a bit too much for a 230 lb rider on a XR650R for a general off road application, but it also depends on the valving, viscosity of the the oil, volume of oil, etc. There are different theory's on suspension (spring rates vs valving) and some shops subscribe to using slightly different weights of springs for their valve stacks when compared to other shops, but that doesn't mean some shops are wrong and some are right because there's different ways to accomplish great results when setting up suspension. If you were to compare Race Tech & Mx Tech setups, you'll find they recommend different spring rates and they will be using different valve stacks, different nitrogen pressures, different oil volumes, different oil viscosities, etc. Ideally, you want to use up as much of the suspension as possible without frequent bottoming to get the most from it. Occasional bottoming off the biggest stuff you do is normal, but your suspension should be plush throughout the range under various conditions, especially at speed. What matters is how your suspension performs in the whoops (does your rear kick or swap, etc)? How about the straights (does it track straight when accelerating, etc)? How about when you hit squared edge bumps at various speeds (are you jolted or jerked or do you feel a firm but progressive action, etc)? How about dips, jumps, ditches, braking bumps, etc? In summary, I think .50kg may be a bit too stiff for the average 230 lb off roader on a XR650R and I would look more towards a .47 kg front springs or get the opinions from several experienced professional suspension tuners before opting for the .50's.

Based on a 230 lb. rider, they sold me 0.50 front springs and a 11.0 rear spring. I said "well....OK, I guess". Doesn't 0.50 springs sound a bit stiff for the front? I thought they would have suggested 0.47's. I asked them about 0.47's and they said they're out of stock (hmmm). They said they've been selling 0.50 springs to the guys with CRF450's and they thought they should work well on a XR650.

I think you're right and Lindemann is using a rate calcuation based on MX use.

I also bought the .50 fork springs from them and they are too stiff! :cry:

(BTW, I'm using a 10.5 shock spring and that seems fine.)

I'm no suspension pro (or even amateur), but with input from BWB63 (Bruce :cry: ) on this board I "re-did" my forks. Bruce recommended the .47s, but I went with Lindemann's rec of the .50 springs. Yikes! Very stiff. I've had to back out the compression and rebound clickers significantly to get somewhat close to what I want.

I now think I'm going to have to try and sell the .50s and buy some .47s.

My 2 cents.

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