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thriller

honing a 98 wr 400

4 posts in this topic

I am installing new rings. To get a good crosshatch pattern what do most of you guys use? Is it ok to use a reg 3 stone spring loaded hone if you do it very fast. Just enough to get the crosshatch?

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I am installing new rings. To get a good crosshatch pattern what do most of you guys use? Is it ok to use a reg 3 stone spring loaded hone if you do it very fast. Just enough to get the crosshatch?

Generally, a multi-ball hone is better for crosshatching engine cylinders. The 3 stone device is more suited to brake master cylinders or for bore honing to size as it is better at removing material.

RADRick

www.mcjournalist.com

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if I do not have the proper ball hone would it be ok in a pinch to use my reg hone though? This is just the spring loaded one, not the one for boring the hole.

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if I do not have the proper ball hone would it be ok in a pinch to use my reg hone though? This is just the spring loaded one, not the one for boring the hole.

In order to get a proper crosshatch you need multiple contact points of the honing material. That's what all the balls in a ball-hone do. With the straight stones used in the other type of hone all you will get is a smooth surface. The crosshatching helps the cylinder wall retain oil, which is very important for break-in and ring seating. If you don't want to spend the money for a ball hone just go to a mchine shop and have them do it for you. I can't imagine they'd charge more than $20. If you plan on tearing down regularly then go with what you've got, but if this is expected to be a long-term repair, do it right. :cry:

RADRick

www.mcjournalist.com

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