HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
thumper245

best way over rocky sections??????

13 posts in this topic

What is the best way over a section of rocks. I just finished a trip threw goler wash to stripedbute and the rocks just about kicked my but. Some how I got lucky and made it over them without hitting the ground. I dont want to be lucky, I want to make it over them without the point and throtle and hope I make it over them. Then when on the way out doing the same thing. I hope that you all can help. Thanks in advance for any effert to help me on this. or is this the only way? PS I can only touch with one tippy toe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the only advice I can give you is stand up, squeeze the tank between your legs and keep your fingers crossed. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

are these boulders that you have to squeeze through and ride completly up and over(rocks the size of cars) or are they the jagged lava type rocks that slash your tires?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only touch tippy toe on my bike too and the best advice to give you is no matter what (especailly on uphillls) keep it moving do not stop!!! Also somtimes what I do is take a good look at the section of trail and pick out the best, easiest line of travel would be. This all may seem like common sense but It does save you alot of energy and frustration. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

are these boulders that you have to squeeze through and ride completly up and over(rocks the size of cars) or are they the jagged lava type rocks that slash your tires?

They are the ones about the size of bowling balls and up to about the size of a milk crate. Around here most of the time it is in a canyon and you come around a blind corner and there it is. You have little or no time to pick a line. Just squeeze the knees tighten grip and twist the right hand. They are usualy anywhere from 5-10 yard runs of rocks that everyone with a 4X4 has tryed to make it up. Some times you wonder if some person has tryed with a two wheele drive repetedly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I like the way the trials riders approach the terrain...confident and with purpose...like a not so casual acquaintence. I believe that waltzing with rocks and bolders requires meaningful choices otherwise resulting in painful consequenses. Your clutch and throttle are your best friends...having to use breaks means it's almost too late! I would use some of the "Smith" system of safe driving that truckers use...seriously.

1. Aim high in steering...

a. maintain eye lead time

b. gather relavent information from distant objects.

c. adjust eye lead to speed

d. keep vehicle rolling by adjusting to conditions

2. Get the BIG picture...

a. make and execute desisions early

b. avoid getting in situations that require reverse!

c. use knowledge/experience to make the ride safe

3. Keep your eyes moving...

a. move eyes every 1-3 seconds

b. avoid staring while evaluating relevant objects

That's about all that applies I think...I like going where other's dare to go too. The rock thing can be tricky for sure and I know luck doesn't always bring you home from a good day of riding...momentum is an required element, it has to be used as you would garlic in spaghetti sauce, to get you where you want to go. Hmmm, some people like lots of garlic...others just a little--I'm the latter at 38 and rising.

That's my .02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rocks and whoops are my forte, but this is definitely an acquired skill. Wish I had a forum like this, & had asked this same question years ago!

Fast and LOOSE. Loosen up your body, don't grip the bars so tight, and let the bike move under you. Also, keep the bike in as high a gear as you dare without stalling the motor; use your clutch to feed power to the rear wheel , taking care not to spin the tire. Keep momentum; this is really important for us guys with 29" inseams heheh! If you have a little run up time before those 4' ledge-type obstacles, get a little momemtum up, have the motor in a gear where you can rev the motor a little, drop the clutch & get a good drive up the face of the rock, but be ready to pull the clutch in a little & lower revs when the tire starts to spin. Keep your helmet over the handlebar mounts, or when standing up the really steep stuff, the front numberpate - you should be able to look down & see the white background.

In the boulders & big ruts where you have to "paddle", try to keep your but slid up toward the front of the seat, & lift your feet forward over obstacles, not back. Your helmet should be above the gas cap. Again, higher gear than you might think & easy on the throttle, using the clutch to feed power & keep wheelspin to a minimum.

Sounds like you probably did ok. Confidence is a big key in the rocks. Just keep practicing- you'll have it down in no time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rocks and whoops are my forte, but this is definitely an acquired skill. Wish I had a forum like this, & had asked this same question years ago!

Fast and LOOSE. Loosen up your body, don't grip the bars so tight, and let the bike move under you. Also, keep the bike in as high a gear as you dare without stalling the motor; use your clutch to feed power to the rear wheel , taking care not to spin the tire. Keep momentum; this is really important for us guys with 29" inseams heheh! If you have a little run up time before those 4' ledge-type obstacles, get a little momemtum up, have the motor in a gear where you can rev the motor a little, drop the clutch & get a good drive up the face of the rock, but be ready to pull the clutch in a little & lower revs when the tire starts to spin. Keep your helmet over the handlebar mounts, or when standing up the really steep stuff, the front numberpate - you should be able to look down & see the white background.

In the boulders & big ruts where you have to "paddle", try to keep your but slid up toward the front of the seat, & lift your feet forward over obstacles, not back. Your helmet should be above the gas cap. Again, higher gear than you might think & easy on the throttle, using the clutch to feed power & keep wheelspin to a minimum.

Sounds like you probably did ok. Confidence is a big key in the rocks. Just keep practicing- you'll have it down in no time.

That is pretty much what I am talking about but without the wanter. I am riding in dry river beds. The most part isnt bad but when you come around a corner and there is a steep incline/decline nothing but rounded rocks the only choice you have is gun it and hold on. Those situations are what I am talking about. So far I have been lucky and stayed on at least one wheel. I do know that I need to drop a tooth on the counter shaft, any tips will be helpful weather setup or teqnique all is appriciated. :cry: If we cross paths on the trail I will owe you a cold one at the end!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0