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XR650L engine longevity ??

12 posts in this topic

just curious what to expect in engine/trans longevity ... XR650L, like new, owned by experienced rider/mechanic ... with obsessive maintenance tendencies ... primarily street/highway riding, how long are these units good for ?

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I wonder about this myself. However, I saw some for sale in the 30,000 mile range and have heard of them going to 40,000 before rebuilding the top end.

Does anyone know what would be a good distance to change the cam chain?

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Dunno how long they'll go, but I use mine for commuting on the freeway about 55 miles a day and for fun supermoto rides on the weekends, and it just passed 28K miles without a single problem ever.

Well, so far anyway.

I ride it hard, but I maintain it well too. Synthetic oil changed every 1500 miles (filter every other oil change), valve adjustments at the same interval.

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no one knows. they've only been on the market for 5 years or so.

the air cooled 600/650s are good for 20+ years with decent care.

jeremiah

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no one knows. they've only been on the market for 5 years or so.

This is the 12th year for the XR650L with no significant changes during that whole time. The first year was 1993.

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"The Chain Gang" web site for BMW GS 650 bikes has a thread showing one of those bikes just hitting the 100,000 miles mark.....so I don`t see why the Honda should be any different at all.....!!!! :cry:

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well, I know the Honda has a lot of dependability, but you can't compare BMW and Honda singles ... while I DESPISE BMW in all shapes and forms (worst bike I ever owned) ... the German/Austrian metallurgical qualities are vastly superior to Japanese aluminum and steel .. thats just the way it is

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well, I know the Honda has a lot of dependability, but you can't compare BMW and Honda singles ... while I DESPISE BMW in all shapes and forms (worst bike I ever owned) ... the German/Austrian metallurgical qualities are vastly superior to Japanese aluminum and steel .. thats just the way it is

BMW doesn't even make the thumper motor in their 650. It's a Rotax. That's just the way it is.

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Rotax engines (like BMW uses) are bulletproof, but at a cost of quite a bit of weight. While I have no idea about the metallurgical properties of German/Austrian metals, I have seen 2 KLRs with over 80,000 miles and running strong, and read about several more. The engineering of an engine is going to truly dictate it's longevity.

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While I have no idea about the metallurgical properties of German/Austrian metals,...(snip)...The engineering of an engine is going to truly dictate it's longevity.

The engineering side is more resposible than anything. Part design blueprints have a material call out. Besides, metal quality is a non-issue nowdays. I would not expect a Mercedes to outlast a Toyota. On the topic of a 650L, Its very similar an engine to the 600, so you could probably accurately compare them(if anyone has run a 600 as long as they could before it would no longer run). 650Ls probably have more average mileage in general since they are exclusively dual sports and see longer distances at sustained speed(really easy on the engine).

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