Sorta OT Q

Hey All,

This may be off topic, but I think it is most relevant if asked of those who deal with it. I rode the turkey run in RI this weekend and knew I wasn't in good enough shape going into the ride, but was no where near prepared for the level of fatigue I felt. I smashed the radiator approx 52 miles into the ride. At that point I think it was the fatigue that allowed the bike to fall that hard. My question is what do you all do to prepare yourselves to wrestle that 300+ pound pig along with tight trails for 60-70 miles or more. To be honest, I caught myself eyeing those lightweight bikes (ktm's and such), but had to slap my hand to stop myself from think I made the wrong choice.

Chan (still sore from sunday)

This probably ain't what you wanna hear, but speed is your friend. Ever try to slow down to somebody else's pace ? You have to deal with every little rock/rut/root. It's easier to go faster. You need to trust your instincts and have your suspension set right. If you tense up at alot of obstacles you're burning precious energy.

A lighter bike may relieve the symptoms somewhat, but I ride with guys on light bikes that don't finish and they're in way better shape and don't drink/smoke like me.

B.t.w., I often barely finish some of the muddy rides because I can't follow the advice I just wrote when I'm in the mud. Once I loose confidence in my front brake I'm a wanker. That ain't the bike's fault, though.

On those rides I force myself to laugh and remember that I'd rather be doing this than most anything else.

I've thought about switching to an EXC200-300 after/during some of my rides/races, but I think I'd regret it in the long run since I'm not going for the win anyways. I love this bike 90% of the time.

My 2 cents.

Boy, Chan, do I ever know how you feel. :thumbsup:

I'm ridin a Z400S, and even though it successfully completed a diet plan, and all the essential woods mods, at my age, it still is pretty tough to be sharp for extended periods of time. And in the heat, whew, it's that much worse!

I'v been going to the gym three times a week for the last few months in an attempt to get stronger in my quads, butt, pecs, and cardio. My fitness is much improved and am now better able to withstand more of the rigors. Also practicing to flow with the bike in a smoother more relaxed state. Less muscle & more finess. Practice, Practice.

Love my Z.... however, I too am not able to look away from some of the much lighter and more nimble bikes.

I anticipate probably buying a CRF250X or WR250F by the turn of the year. Good luck.

SSR :devil:

Those are good thoughts Brian.

Especially the 'rather be doing this than anything else.'

And the, 'not going for the win anyway.' Sometimes I get too caught up in the 'race to win' and forget that I came out to ride for fun and that other than the best is OK too.

Then I try to settle into a smooth, consistant, line & time.

True & real important about the suspension too. If it's way out, you're in for the fight of your life.

SSR :thumbsup:

In my experience the easiest way to go fast over a long course is to have very good electrolytes in the camelback...try ultrareplenish.com or something similar. Water alone wont do it. Gatorade is horrible. Guys who race with Red Bull or just water or gatorade or whatever are missing out.

If you have the full on electrolyte deal going on you will be on fire for hours--focused, sharp, capable.

After getting the electrolyte deal worked out, then its time to get your suspension dealt with. Then brakes. Then motor.

For a race under 2-3 hours i just dont see the well prepared BRP as a handicap IF you are focused. But longer races even superman cant compete with a lighter KTM or whatever.

mikekay,

I think you just mentioned the most important item of all: staying hydrated, and with the right drink.

Even joy riding sometimes (without a drinkpak) I'll stick a bottle of something in my coat's back pouch pocket.

When I stop for a break, and chug some, I feel 100% better and more capable again...which also allows me to more enjoy the rides.

It is probably the most single most important make or break issue. :devil: Sometimes I take some salted peanut butter crackers along too, for energy & fluid retention.

SSR :thumbsup:

To stay in shape, ride the pig on a MX track a few times each week. A lighter bike for 'racing' 60 to 70 miles of tight single track would certainly be easier that riding the pig, but the pig isn't too bad on single track when you're just out for fun.

very good electrolytes in the camelback...try ultrareplenish.com or something similar.

Pedialyte and Cytomax are good products that do help alot.

because I can't follow the advice I just wrote

:lol::thumbsup::devil:

Whoa! At least now I know I'm not the only one who doesn't always follow his own advice :awww:

Hey All,

This may be off topic, but I think it is most relevant if asked of those who deal with it. I rode the turkey run in RI this weekend and knew I wasn't in good enough shape going into the ride, but was no where near prepared for the level of fatigue I felt. I smashed the radiator approx 52 miles into the ride. At that point I think it was the fatigue that allowed the bike to fall that hard. My question is what do you all do to prepare yourselves to wrestle that 300+ pound pig along with tight trails for 60-70 miles or more. To be honest, I caught myself eyeing those lightweight bikes (ktm's and such), but had to slap my hand to stop myself from think I made the wrong choice.

Chan (still sore from sunday)

The XR650R is a beast. No if and's or but's about it. Out here in So-Cal it is a perfect bike because you have the desert and areas where you can ride in 3rd,4th and 5th gear. If all you riding is tight singletrack and woods I would sell the pig and go lighter. Your not going to have the torque and overall power but atleast you won't be lugging 300+ lbs all over.

I've also begun to ntice that a lot of pig riders are BIG guys. And those of us who are big don't really seem to mind the weight of the pig. Now if you are 6 ft tall and 160 lbs I would not want to have to deal with the weight of the beast. Being a big guy makes it easier to keep the bike under control and also allows me to have both feet on the ground when sitting on it and my knees are still bent!

Anyway enough babbling.. :thumbsup:

Even if you did buy a smaller lighter bike that doesn't mean you won't get tired. I have ridden with guys that have small bikes and they get worn out after a few miles. The most important thing is not to ride over your head to keep pace with someone that is faster. If you are getting tired you need to recognize it and slow down some. As far as getting into shape to ride the woods I like to ride on a mx track until I can't hardly hold onto the bike. Another thing is to relax on the bike. It is big and to a certain point you kinda just have to let it go where it wants. :thumbsup:

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now