What type of oil do you use??

I have run Amsoil for the last year and a half. Oil changed every 3 rides, filter every 6. I checked the valves last month and there is zero wear on them. :thumbsup:

:devil:

You have some good points, but let me say a few things.

When I change my oil and pull those 5 or so different plugs I notice that some of it looks worse than the rest of the oil and some oil looks fairly new compared to the oil from the plugs on the bottom. Why is this? Because the clutch and gear box oil doesn't mix with the oil the piston uses. The piston oil is most critical, and thanks to yamaha's engine's serperate oil compartments the piston oil stays cleaner longer.

Do me a favor and add up how much money you are spending by changing your oil every other time you ride. I'm also interested in how often you ride. If you ride every day for about an hour and a half like I do, there is no f..ing way I could aford to spend, not just the money, but time to change the oil every other time I ride. I'm not saying your wrong or doing something stupid for changing oil that often. If I had a million dollars and a mech working for me I would have him change oil and filter and air filter every time I rode it! :awww:

You make good points about yamaha selling the oil and all :lol: Mobile is a great oil maker too. Is the oil your using non-friction modified? Does it say it for "Motorcyles"? Not tring to be a wise A$$, seriously asking. Because if it is I would like to take a look at it. :thumbsup:

And no I don't trail ride, the YZ450 is not a trail bike. I've had a motocross style track ( about 3.5 acres ) since I was a kid. My dad loves building jumps and banking up corners ect. It looks really good, if any of yall live near Memphis TN let me know and you can come ride :D

I hate for this to be a pissing match and I don't want to sound like a know-it-all but sadly you are misinformed. Yamaha DOES NOT use seperate oil compartments for the tranny and the top end. The Honda CRF does though.

YOUR Yz450 uses the same oil for the tranny and the top end. THAT is why you must change it. If you don't want to that is fine....it's not my bike. Just trying to help. Also, If your oil is clean after 20hrs....your not racing your bike.

As far as Mobil one Red Cap, if you would read the previous replys here or did a little research you would know that Mobil 1 15-50 Red Cap has no friction modifiers. Any oil with modifiers would make the clutch clip and of course we would not be using it...........

Do what you want, just trying to make your life easier in the long run...

Lata

Hey, what is wrong with Yamahalube????? Yamaha tests their bikes with it and recommends it!

Yamaha was one of the Japanese high performance motorcycle manufacturers whose dissatisfaction with API (American Petroleum Institute) oils lead to the founding of JASO. JASO (I'm not certain of the how the acronym translates) is the Japanese equivalent, but is not beholding in any way to the Quixotic whims of the EPA.

Yamaha originally recommended API grade SG oils for the 03 YZ450F and YZ250F, and I believe this was what they specified for 04 as well. The EPA mandated a move away from SG to the newer SJ grade because SG had were reducing additives that the EPA and very few others considered harmful. No SG oil is the equivalent of an SG in the opinion of JASO, whose MA grade is the same as the old SG.

Since Yamaha specified an SG, and YamaLube 4R is an SJ, I use Golden Spectra 10w-40 year-round in SoCal. If Mobil 1 red were an SG, I wouldn't use it anyway. 20-50s are too heavy to circulate and drain back fast enough at 11,000 rpm, IMHO and that of others.

Avoid JASO MB oils in any unit where it would contact a clutch. CRFs can use them, and they have more friction reducers than MAs with the same wear qualities.

That's my nickel

Mobil 1 15w-50 is a 15w oil.

Not so fate there eh Gray Ghost.... I have been using Golden Spectro 20w/50 for 4 years and have never seen a problem with oil return problems, even in the dead of winter when racing harescrambles at 28-50 degrees. There is not an oil starvation problem with the weight of this oil.

Bonzai :thumbsup:

You guys need to visit www.bobistheoilguy.com and do more research on your motor oils. I personally have the red cap in mine right now but this oil does have moly in it(friction modifier). Don't ask me why it doesn't make most of our clutches slip. Valvoline vr1 20w50 doesnt have "energy conserving" on the bottom of the circle but valvoline says it will make your clutch slip. :thumbsup::devil:

That is wierd.

How about "real world" testing? I have been using Mobil 1 15-50 red cap for 2 years and I ride MX almost every weekend. My 02 YZ426F still has the stock clutch and I have not had to split the cases for any tranny problem. I have replaced the piston and rings but it was a preventative measure and the one I took out was just fine and the engine was spotless inside......same with the cam journals.....no unusual wear at all and the valves are perfectly shimmed and have not been reshimmed since June of 2003.

That I believe is called a testimonial.

To put this to bed once and for all, we need a few people to send their oil samples to http://www.blackstone-labs.com/ for analysis. I've used these guys for my boat and they give you lots of detailed info. Then post the results, along with how many hours are on the oil, the kind and weight of the oil and how many hours between changes. Then we will have some real data to look at. These guys tell you all kinds of cool stuff, such as how much of what kind of metal is in the oil, etc.. Also there are some interesting articles on that web site. For example, by the types of metal that they find in your oil they can tell you where the wear is occurring (rod bearing, cylinder, etc..). Good discussion on viscosity too. Good stuff.

I run Wesson, but I hear that a good peanut oil is just as good. :thumbsup:

Not so fate there eh Gray Ghost.... I have been using Golden Spectro 20w/50 for 4 years and have never seen a problem with oil return problems, even in the dead of winter when racing harescrambles at 28-50 degrees. There is not an oil starvation problem with the weight of this oil.

That may be your experience. Yamaha recommends 10w-40 for temperature ranges between 14 to 110 (F), which covers the ambient everywhere I ride. They recommend some form of multi-viscosity 40 weight 3 to 1 over a 20w-50. Chevrolet's Racing Division (yes I know they don't make motorcycles) has stated that there is no practical benefit to using any more than a 30 weight oil in any of their engines except where the temperatures are expected to be above 100 during a race.

There's no need to run a 50 weight, there's no benefit from better lubrication, and there is a higher load placed on the oil pump (which is a power loss) and lower circulation and return rates with the heavier oil.

Oil return problems don't happen to every engine. Once, while running a Ford 460 I helped a friend build for jet boat racing on a dyno, I had a chance to see it happening. The pan we used had a sight tube on it. At 7000 rpm running 40 weight, the engine had barely enough oil in the pan out of 6 quarts to cover the pump pickup. We changed to a straight 30 weight and there was three times that amount in the pan at the same speed. How exactly that compares to a YZ450F at 11,000 is as much a mystery to me as it is to you, but think what would have happened that boat engine one day if it had been a quart low, and remember that would be the same as your 450 losing 6 ounces.

Feel free to continue using what you are getting good results from. At the least GS 20w-50 is probably an MA oil, so that alone makes a better choice than Mobil 1. Like I said, it's my nickel, take it for what it's worth :thumbsup:

I run Wesson, but I hear that a good peanut oil is just as good. :thumbsup:

Don't laugh! Some years ago the Brazilian Government was using peanut to fuel their diesels in order to save money!

There's no need to run a 50 weight, there's no benefit from better lubrication, and there is a higher load placed on the oil pump (which is a power loss) and lower circulation and return rates with the heavier oil.

Don't get too caught up in all this. 20-50 is not 50 wt oil....it's 20wt oil. Also, Yamaha sells you a $6000 motorcycle with fish oil in the forks and generic (not Yamalube) oil in the engine........go figure.

Like I said before , real world testimonials take precedence over "theory" every time.

20-50 is not 50 wt oil....it's 20wt oil.

Actually, it's the other way around, sort of. 20w-50 is a 50 weight oil. That is, at "normal" operating oil temperatures of 175 degrees (F) or so, a 50 and a 20w-50 are the same viscosity and their fluid behavior is the same. The difference is at low temperatures.

The "w" in a multi-grade designation such as 20w-50 stands for "winter". A 20w-50 oil will be the same viscosity at 10 degrees (F) as a straight 20 weight, and the same as a 50 weight at 200. The difference is that multi-grades don't thicken as much when the temperature drops, and you get better circulation during cold starts in cold climates.

I hope your answer was suppose to be funny. W = "Winter"???

Multi viscosity oils work like this: Polymers are added to a light base (5W, 10W, 20W), which prevent the oil from thinning as much as it warms up. At cold temperatures the polymers are coiled up and allow the oil to flow as their low numbers indicate. As the oil warms up the polymers begin to unwind into long chains that prevent the oil from thinning as much as it normally would. The result is that at 100 degrees C the oil has thinned only as much as the higher viscosity number indicates. Another way of looking at multi-vis oils is to think of a 20W-50 as a 20 weight oil that will not thin more than a 50 weight would when hot.

Read this ....

http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-overview.html

Mobil One Red Cap 15w-50

for the thousanth time...the only way to go.... :thumbsup:

im not touching this pissing match with someone else's 10 foot stick.

in the 426 i use mobli 1 15-50 red cap it was what was recomened by the guy i bought it from, and i know how much exsperience he has with the bike. now on my street bikes i have had (and roadraced) and still have i use golden spectrum full syn 20-50 unless im breaking in the motor then i use a non synthectic oil. its worked great for years on the same road race motor never torn down, and always every time i rode it at the track whinding 7 to 8000rpm and above no problems ever anytime or place this was on a cbr f3 600, now my gsxr 1100 i use the same oil nothing else, and its putting out some realy good naturaly aspriated hp. have fun with the technical disscusions im using what i know works. :awww::thumbsup::devil:

A pissing match is what's going on in the thread on "finding the loudest pipe". We're just talking motor oil.

A pissing match is what's going on in the thread on "finding the loudest pipe". We're just talking motor oil.

:devil::awww::lol::D:thumbsup:

hehehe no shiznit there hehe man are they getting pissed in that thread.

Not to be different from the norm, but Shell Rotella T 5W40 Synthetic diesel oil here. Why?

Mobil 1 15w40 red cap made the clutch noise and grabbiness in my 00 worse. Plus it's around $5/quart.

The Rotella T is a diesel heavy duty oil. Is $12/gallon. Is rated for turbochargers and catepillar clutches, which helps it resist shearing due to gears unlike normal car oils. Since it is multigrade, the 5w helps it pour nice and easy, plus the 40 highrange is right in line.

Main reason - I run it in every vehicle I own - boat with Chevy 350, Tahoe with 350, Silverado with 5.3, and the bike. I first heard of it with LS1 Camaro guys using it, and haven't had an issue. There are also some interesting positive threads on the bobistheoilguy site concerning this oil.

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