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lightweight people

4 posts in this topic

I am 150 lbs after I eat a big dinner. To the best of my knowledge I still have the stock springs and oil, and oil level as well as valving. I have both compression and rebound set really soft, and have found it the only comfortable way to avoid feeling like im riding a tunning fork. most of the riding i do is open dessert, lots of rocks and small chop, with occasional big dips. Should i revalve and or drop spring rates. I can not get bike to bottom shock or forks.

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Take a look at the Race Tech site (www.racetech.com). A lot of folks use their spring calculator to determine the correct spring/valve rates, based on weight and riding type.

It would also be a good idea for you to contact Race Tech directly, I have heard that on occasion the spring calculator is off a little. I'm not sure which models or years.

By the way, the owners manual and the Race Tech site say that the 1998 WR is setup for a 160 pound rider. Soemthing to consider.

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I would suggest that you talk to a few suspension tuners before spending money on new springs.

The race tech spring guide is a start but it really is no substitute for a good suspension tuner.

I would start by calling a few desert suspension experts. I race dez here in So. Cal and out here ESP, ACME, ESR, and a couple of others really know there dez stuff as well as what it takes to get different types of bikes to work for your weight, bike, skill level, and just general bike set up. I am sure you have some guys up in your area that are knowledgeable about your area. Start by calling each of them and see what they would do to your bike to get it to work for you. Then make your choice as to what to do.

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