Changing a tire...what am I doing wrong??

I ended up getting a stick through my rear tire, so I decided to try to change it myself.  I watched a few youtube videos....and they all made it look like a piece of cake.  Well, after wrestling around with the old tire trying to get it off....I finally managed to break it loose from the wheel after about 45min of torquing on it with the tire spoons....what a pain.  I went ahead and put the new tube in the new tire, and carefully tried to get it onto the new wheel.  I used lots of soap spray just like the guys said to do online........holy crap, it took me another 45min to get the new tire one, and when it was all said and done I ended up with a pitched tube that I'm now going to have to pull back out and patch.....a scratched up wheel, and a few bloody knuckles. 

What am I doing wrong? Do most people change their own tires, or do they just take them to the shop to have them done?  For almost 2 hours of my time wrestling around with the damn thing, and a pinched tube....I'd gladly pay a shop a decent amount of money to do it for me next time.

Is there a faster, easier, better way to change a tire instead of screwing around with all of those tire spoons?? 

 

Oh my. I think everyone has been in your shoes at some point :blink:

Slather it up with baby powder instead of soapy water and inflate new the tube after u get one side of the tire on to get wrinkles out then deflate and get the other side on. When the beads tight at the end you can hammer it on with a rubber mallet... 

Edited by Casing-daily

Take it to the tyre shop much simpler much easier much quicker

What do most bike shops charge to change a tire?

If you think that's tough,try mounting a studded tire with 1300 screws in it and a liner to prevent the screws from puncturing the tube.
When you do get one side on the rim,make sure you have the bead as deep into the rim as possible to allow enough slack to get the second side around the edge of the wheel.
Good luck, and practice makes it easier.

Its a good skill set to learn if your in the field and have a spare tube ready . but if you brought  the bike home in that shape I think its worth spending 20-30 bucks replacing the tube from a shop . no bloody knuckles ,scratching rims and more pinched tubes . Shops invested in bead popping smooth and fast machines  that take the sweat out of the equation .

18 minutes ago, Casing-daily said:

Oh my. I think everyone has been in your shoes at some point :blink:

Slather it up with baby powder instead of soapy water and inflate new the tube after u get one side of the tire on to get wrinkles out then deflate and get the other side on. When the beads tight at the end you can hammer it on with a rubber mallet... 

Don't deflate it completely. If you leave enough air in it so its not wrinkled you will never pinch a tube.

3 minutes ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Don't deflate it completely. If you leave enough air in it so its not wrinkled you will never pinch a tube.

Since I've been doing this i never pinched a tube.  My first tire i did took me over an hour , 2 pinched tubes and lots of swearing. Now 15 minutes if im not going fast and swear free. Practice.  Also warm the tire up first put it under a warm car hood for 15 minutes this helps.

I use these tools and ya there are lots vids but I used this.

20160615_173955.jpg

You can change a tire yourself. The difference between you experience and a 20 min job is, well, experience.

Use a 5 gallon bucket to put the wheel on. Break the bead on the old one by pushing down hard, use your knees, palms, and/or a rubber mallet. Get the bead down in the middle of the rim and work start at the other side--it gives you more room to get it off the rim. Use plenty of soap and water and make sure it is down in the bead. push the rim lock all the way in. I like to place two irons in to start, crank the first over and tuck it under the rotor or sprocket. The second is the hard one. Make sure you are not in too far to avoid the tube. Also keep the rim lock and valve stem away from where the bead is sunk in the rim and where you are starting. If you start opposite the valve stem you risk ripping the rubber around it as the bead and stem fight for the lower ground.

To put the new one on, follow the directions above re: the tube. Spread the tire and put the rim in the middle to start--don't try putting the bead over the rim twice from the same side! Use the same tricks listed.

Replacing or repairing your tube will be easy. Just get one side off and work the tube out and then back in, then put that side back in place.

If you are new to the process having a second person to hold/place/turn a tire iron can be helpful. Also good tire irons help a lot. I like the longer two sided ones with a thin shaped side (the two shown by Filter above). Spoons are also nice. I have an aluminum one that might be from motion pro that has a small lip to hook on the rim that I like--it helps keep from pinching the tube. Don't be trying to do this with screw drivers or pry bars.

 

Edited by mikea 2

like ppl have been saying it just takes practice and learning small little tricks. Took me over 2 hours first time now if i try to go fast can have it off and on in less than 10 min. I had used a studded tire this winter and had a yoga mat liner in there on a 19inch, well after getting a few flats from the bolts near the end of the season i got some good tire changing practice in and my times on regular tires were drastically better. I also made a simple tire changing machine to hold it at waist lvl, this made a huge difference as well, because half the battle when doing it on the ground is keeping the tire still.

10 hours ago, IQRaceworks said:

I ended up getting a stick through my rear tire, so I decided to try to change it myself.  I watched a few youtube videos....and they all made it look like a piece of cake.  Well, after wrestling around with the old tire trying to get it off....I finally managed to break it loose from the wheel after about 45min of torquing on it with the tire spoons....what a pain.  I went ahead and put the new tube in the new tire, and carefully tried to get it onto the new wheel.  I used lots of soap spray just like the guys said to do online........holy crap, it took me another 45min to get the new tire one, and when it was all said and done I ended up with a pitched tube that I'm now going to have to pull back out and patch.....a scratched up wheel, and a few bloody knuckles. 

What am I doing wrong? Do most people change their own tires, or do they just take them to the shop to have them done?  For almost 2 hours of my time wrestling around with the damn thing, and a pinched tube....I'd gladly pay a shop a decent amount of money to do it for me next time.

Is there a faster, easier, better way to change a tire instead of screwing around with all of those tire spoons?? 

 

The big thing with changing a tire that most people miss in their first few, is the importance of keeping the opposite side of the bead in the middle, "drop center" part of the rim. If the far side is still anywhere up on the bead area of the rim, it ain't going to happen. Talcum powder on the tube, enough air in the tube to give it a little bit of shape, some sort of bead lube for the tire (I use RuGlyde from the NAPA auto parts store), and rounded end spoons (Motion Pro), all make the job much easier. One other thing that I consider a "necessary luxury" is a tire changing stand. I got a cheapy Tusk (RMATV house brand)stand that makes life sooo much easier. Local shop charges $25 ea to change them, if you go through 2 sets of tires in a season, that $100 will pretty much cover your stand and levers. Then all is free from that point on.. :thumbsup:

I feel your pain, I had to replace a tube on my sons klx110 last fall. I wound up buying 5 tire irons because the first two would pinch the tubes. (Wooden tire buddy) bought 3 real tire spoons and used powder instead of soapy water. Got it on in a hour. I will envtually by a tire press off eBay just to make it easier. (Personal choice)

Yep...good on ya for trying to do it yourself. If you are a trail rider, IMHO, you must be able to change your own tire.  Its really not hard if you do it right.

I tried Dunlop's way (per their vids) always struggled. The toughest part is the first bead. With the tube in, that 1st bead can be a royal pain. Then I found Doug Schopinsky's videos. I've now pretty much mastered his method. Its super easy.  To get good at it, I spent some quality time with a DOT tire and a silver wheel and on and off the tire went.

http://motocross.transworld.net/features/tuesday-tip-tire-changing-part-2/#LRIuDYOmsvs4jBG0.97

And here is me showing that it works (its now a how to demo....see Doug's vid for that).  And just fyi...I'm actually better at this now than I was when I filmed the vid...all it takes is practice!

NOTE- getting the tire off the wheel is simple....angle the wheel/tire such that the sprocket isn't laying in the dirt and use the heel of your boot to break the bead. Flip it over and repeat.  There are additional vids from Doug on the other steps of tire changing...the one above is the only part I ever found hard.

Dave

Edited by dmac1

Practice is all.

I totally disagree about the 5 gallon bucket idea.  You need a STABLE surface to work on, not a bucket that will tip over.

Baja No Pinch tool makes it so much easier.

28 minutes ago, dmac1 said:

Yep...good on ya for trying to do it yourself. If you are a trail rider, IMHO, you must be able to change your own tire.  Its really not hard if you do it right.

I tried Dunlop 's way (per their vids) always struggled. The toughest part is the first bead. With the tube in, that 1st bead can be a royal pain. Then I found Doug Schopinsky's videos. I've now pretty much mastered his method. Its super easy.  To get good at it, I spent some quality time with a DOT tire and a silver wheel and on and off the tire went.

http://motocross.transworld.net/features/tuesday-tip-tire-changing-part-2/#LRIuDYOmsvs4jBG0.97

And here is me showing that it works (its now a how to demo....see Doug's vid for that).  And just fyi...I'm actually better at this now than I was when I filmed the vid...all it takes is practice!

NOTE- getting the tire off the wheel is simple....angle the wheel/tire such that the sprocket isn't laying in the dirt and use the heel of your boot to break the bead. Flip it over and repeat.  There are additional vids from Doug on the other steps of tire changing...the one above is the only part I ever found hard.

Dave

Nice video Dave, you picked a windstorm to do it in, lol.

2 hours ago, Still Bill said:

Practice is all.

I totally disagree about the 5 gallon bucket idea.  You need a STABLE surface to work on, not a bucket that will tip over.

Anti fatigue foam or yoga mat is the safest. 

I think whoever told me the 5 gallon bucket idea had it out for me. 

If the bucket is used, you pretty much guarantee damage to your scrotum. 

Edited by Casing-daily
4 minutes ago, Casing-daily said:

Anti fatigue foam or yoga mat is the safest. 

I think whoever told me the 5 gallon bucket idea had it out for me. 

If the bucket is used, you pretty much guarantee damage to your scrotum. 

So far I haven't had a problem with a scrotum when using a bucket (which I have done for a good 40 years).  Don't post a picture,  but you guys that have that problem,  please describe how you hold the tools? 

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