Left vs Right Corners

I'm watching all these expert vids and on left corners the left leg is out and they are still on the rear brake. Obviously right corners are different.

 

The few explanations I've found are very vague. Anybody want to chime in?

I find right turn vs left turn difference more due to the fact that my power leg is on the outside peg on a left turn. Funny, now that I think about it, while my left turn is more aggressive/faster my right turn is smother and more consistent but slower. I notice this same effect when I snow ski.

I've always been comfortable staying on the rear brake as deeply as I need going into right hand corners. It only takes a split second to put the right foot down if needed for a correction, or to extend it during acceleration. I practice brake slides to power slides without any coasting both directions, which probably helps. Since I'm either braking with the rear or accelerating, my front tire isn't prone to washing out. Being able to delay braking and go deeper into right hand corners really provides great passing opportunities.

Edited by motrock93b

I'm so much more comfortable turning left at speed. Part of that is the ability to keep foot on rear brake pedal, part of it is from all my years of street riding/racing, left hand corners always have bigger radii because you're in the outside lane and is unlikely oncoming traffic will cross the yellow to the outside of the turn. Another reason is I'm left eye dominant so I see better to the left in attack position, also countersteering with the throttle hand into RH turns means I'm slightly less exact with throttle inputs, especially while rev matching downshifts and trail-braking. I blow way more right hand corners on dirt than lefts.

Edited by HeavyRotation

Call me crazy but the fast I got the less I thought about this. It became more of get to that corner in a big hurry and smash the binders.....bet yourself slowed down (but by all means not slowed down......just shave a tad bit of speed so you won't blow it) and rail. Concentrating on weighting the outside peg and getting the throttle on smoothly.

I also found that really feeling that inner knee pressing against the shroud kinda let's your foot do what it wants or not do anything depending on the foot haha

...  and smash the binders.....

 

By "binders" do you mean ruts, berms etc.  Anything that holds the bike in the corner?

Binders=brakes

The only difference I can think of is that a lot of times i stay standing later into right hand corners. If i need to be on my rear brake and can't have my foot out, id rather be standing, i can balance more precisely and have less chance of low siding because i can't have my foot out to dab. Everything after that seems the same.

I'm watching all these expert vids and on left corners the left leg is out and they are still on the rear brake. Obviously right corners are different.

 

The few explanations I've found are very vague. Anybody want to chime in?

 

It is why the smartest racers I know practice using short figure 8's.   It is about the only way to make yourself do right hand corners that you can compare to your left hand corners immediately.   Do 5 minutes of them hard enough to break a sweat each time you go out to practice.   You might be REALLY surprised at what happens to your confidence when you aren't thinking so much about setting up for a righthand turn.  

The only recommandation I can tell if you worrie about not having the right foot brake while turn right, always keep your finger on the brake brake and if it happens something, use it. I already have this issues because I am a big rear wheel braker, but I concentrate on this technic and now I found my right turn sometime faster than my left because when I turn left, my foot is not always present to shift my gear when exit

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