Clutch Control

Hey, i always try to see how the pro's work with their clutch..

 

I think the most don't use the clutch when they are breaking right?

But when they come out from the turn and hit the throttle again i think i saw the most used it.. ?

 

I watched the Monster Energy Supercross. There are very much 180° turns,

would be interesting to know if they mostly use there the second or third gear?

 

Hope someone can give me some tips. Thank you

One finger. Keep it covered and use it all the time. Engine bogs, slip it. tire looses traction, slip it.  throttle hand tries to whiskey, slip it.

 

I would think Supercross berms would be dependant on what's right after.  I was watching Toronto 2016 on you tube and then had a sharp nasty deep rut left turn they said people were coming out of in first gear.

No clutch while shifting or breaking and slip the clutch of the bike bogs or you lose traction.

Clutch in, rev the rpms up, = more power to the ground. Ease it out to gain traction.

One or two fingers on the clutch all the time, same with the front brake.

No clutch when shifting up or down, don't need it if you do it right, down shif is a no brainier, you just click down a gear, but you need to be carful when u up shift with no clutch by making sure you let off the gas.

I learned how to drive on a 5spd and have owned many stick vehicles so I just used the clutch like I would on a car. The biggest thing for me was learning that you can slip the living shit out of a dirt bike clutch and its totally fine and how its meant to be used. In some situations its easier to keep the RPMs way up and use the clutch to modulate the power delivery. You can hear all the guys with trials background doing this when hitting big obstacles.

To answer your questions, no clutch on braking and always one finger covering the clutch and always one finger operation. If you have a hydro clutch, you're in luck. If cable, make sure that cable and all other moving parts from lever down to the bearings on the clutch arm at the case are lubed well. Make sure your perch isn't too worn. All of this will give you the easiest pull you can get out of it. You can slip the clutch coming out of a corner to really rip out of it if the traction is available. Or you can slip the clutch coming out of corner if youre in too high of a gear or end up lower in the RPMs on exit than you want to be.  

Learning to feather the clutch on hill climbs has transformed them for me. 

Depends on how and what you ride. I ride a kinda old school way which includes stomping on the rear brake and sliding (sorta like what the road guys call backing in), so I have to pull the clutch or it stalls. I also tend to use the old gear higher and slip the clutch method a lot. I also found the hard way that four strokes don't like the rear stomped on over jumps without the clutch pulled. Not that I'm a pro or anything :lol:

Hey, i always try to see how the pro's work with their clutch..

 

I think the most don't use the clutch when they are breaking right?

But when they come out from the turn and hit the throttle again i think i saw the most used it.. ?

 

I watched the Monster Energy Supercross. There are very much 180° turns,

would be interesting to know if they mostly use there the second or third gear?

 

Hope someone can give me some tips. Thank you

 

Below is an article I wrote a while ago.  It will answer your question and more.  I would say the pros are in 2nd gear through a 180 corner. Hope this helps. 

 

Understanding the secrets below will enable you to have a lot more speed and control into and through the corners. Most times what you think you know isn't enough. Many times the rest of what you need to know has been right there the entire time...you just didn't recognize it.

 

The most critical part of the corner is at the transition. What is the transition? It's where you go from controlling the bike with the brakes to controlling it with the clutch and throttle, there can't be any coasting between. You go from braking to accelerating. How simple is that?  Now that you know it you will need to consistently be doing it correctly at a slow pace, then you can start adding speed to it. Once you have it down you will be amazed how much faster your corners will be.

 

Here's an example to help you understand just how easy this secret is applied. When entering a corner if you coast between braking and accelerating you give up a lot of your control because the brakes give you over 50% of your control. The way you must compensate for this, lose of control, is to slow down. But at the same time if you don't enter the corner fast enough you don't need to ride the brakes longer and harder.  In another example lets say you enter the corner faster but then brake too hard.  If you hit the front brake too hard you may knife the front wheel and/or slide it out.  If you rear brake to hard...kill the engine...slide out and so on.  Not braking hard enough isn't going to work either as you will over shoot the corner. This is why it's vital to get very skilled at controlling the brakes while you are feeling what's needed. Riding with more control is way more fun.

 

As you're within several feet of the transition this braking control could be maintaining a light touch of both the front and rear brakes as you begin to transfer to the clutch and throttle. In other conditions it maybe a lot more aggressive braking before more aggressive clutch and throttle control is applied. Then there is the entire range between feathering the brakes and locking them up. Again, you have to control the brakes as you are feeling what is needed not only to slow down but to control the bike...making it do exactly what you want it to do...hold the same angle, cut shorter, go wider, steer with the rear wheel, with the front wheel. It's all done with the brakes and your body movements. Improving as you're practicing is an awesome feeling.

 

Just knowing and understanding this is good but it's only the first step. You have to know how to practice it in order to eventually do it automatically at full speed. It has to be programmed into your subconscious mind...into your automatic reflex reactions.  The only way for this to happen is to repeat the process correctly through repetition and to repeat it frequently. Every time you ride be mindful of it and feel the improvements.

 

If you want to feel massive improvements riding your dirt bike purchasing my "Motocross Braking Techniques DVD or Stream" is a very small investment that will bring priceless results:  

 

Gary; thanks for your personal help throughout my career. Your methods and strategies made my practice and training time much more effective. (Jeremy McGrath)

 

"Motocross Corner Speed - Beyond the Basics" 

 

Ride Hard, Ride Smart,

Gary Semics

Gary, you emphasize going from braking to accelerating with NO COASTING.  Doug Dubach stresses to finish braking early then coast into a corners.

 

I realize there are always 2 ways to skin a cat but which one of you has the mainstream approach? Meaning, if we polled 100 A level riders on this, how many would be doing it your way and how many Dougs?

Understand that 'coasting' isn't coasting. Dubach is in a rutted corner,  his coasting is still on throttle with the clutch disengaged enough that it isn't pulling you wildly. Slipping the clutch is a way to get the precision to maintain balance and exit smoothly, especially when you get into ruts that are higher then 2nd gear.

Edited by temporarily_locked

I agree with Gary there should not be a pause between breaking and rolling on the throttle and releasing the clutch. Coasting is time wasted. There should be a smooth transition from breaking to throttle.

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