What Track Features Create the Most Injuries?

I think anyone in their right mind knows their limits of what they can do and I don't really think it's the doubles that's ruining mx, I think it's more of the triples. I go to the track and I hit one jump that's 110 ft and it's a triple but more of a flat table to a fsr single. I think when people start pushing and pushing and going bigger to go faster the injuries add up. I love mx but I'm not going to hit a jump I'm not comfortable with because I'd like to ride rhe following weekend and be able to work the week. Another thing that's dangerous about mx is the infamous C class. Those kids try to go so fast with zero skill to back it up. I'm a c rider myself but I can ride with skill and not over my head. Those guys can't hold their lines to save their lives. I'm about over getting ran into. They come out of the gate sideways hit the Rev limiter and pop the clutch and are just flat out of control. But it's funny to watch I guess....

Another thing that's dangerous about mx is the infamous C class. Those kids try to go so fast with zero skill to back it up. I'm a c rider myself but I can ride with skill and not over my head. Those guys can't hold their lines to save their lives. I'm about over getting ran into. They come out of the gate sideways hit the Rev limiter and pop the clutch and are just flat out of control. But it's funny to watch I guess....

I watched gopro video on YouTube of "D" class MX a few weeks ago. I'm guessing it was first time ever racers. Popped up automatically after watching some other stuff.

The dude crashed his kx125 on every single lap in a 10 minute moto, even went over the berm once. All minor solo crashes. Rolled 90% of the jumps. I think he went top 3 both motos. Huge entertainment factor.

I was pretty stoked for him.

Edited by clappedoutkx

...except 'Hound and Hare' was also different. Today that would be called an 'Enduro'.

MX was around, then SX came on the scene. Then FMX 'Monster shows' came into the picture. Over time, MX evolved into a version of SX and SX became a free for all version of FMX. It is all about the entertainment dollar. Make each event bigger and more spectacular than the last. A sad reality.

I was lucky, I raced mx 'back in the day' of two guys and a van. Then I got into road racing. Still two guys in a van. Then the giant transporters came and the fun (read camaraderie) left. Some aspects (emergency services and general track safety) got better. Way more spectators. But the days of a buddy loaning you a bike (let alone a part) for a race are long gone.

I've ridden several buddy's bikes in road races in the last ten years. Couple of sprint races where I had mechanical failures during practice and a couple of endurance races where I always ride the other guys bikes because I'm less sensitive to set up. SX style jumps scare me, I stick to old style MX course near my house, more of a premium on corner speed and braking which suits my background anyway.

 I stick to old style MX course near my house, more of a premium on corner speed and braking which suits my background anyway.

That describes me too, to a "T". When I used to race MX, of course there was an ambulance on duty but I would say maybe 1 out of 5 races, they would have to transport anyone to the hospital.  We obviously knew what was going on since there was only ONE ambulance on duty, we would have to sit around and wait until it got back!  NOW, at MX events, I'd have to ask the current MX'ers - How often does the ambulance have to transport?  Every race or every other race or?  Or maybe you aren't even aware if more than 1 ambulance is on duty, the event doesn't have to wait for the return.

I remember sitting on the starting line in the vet class waiting for the ambulances to come back.  Both were make deliveries to the local hospital.

 

The vet class always followed a C class and it seemed to happen every weekend.  More than 1 track had shrines to riders that were killed there which was unheard of earlier.

 

A buddy owns a track in penciltucky and has very few injuries at his place.  He's ridden since the early 70's and knows how to make safe obstacles.

 

It is possible to do.

That describes me too, to a "T". When I used to race MX, of course there was an ambulance on duty but I would say maybe 1 out of 5 races, they would have to transport anyone to the hospital. We obviously knew what was going on since there was only ONE ambulance on duty, we would have to sit around and wait until it got back! NOW, at MX events, I'd have to ask the current MX'ers - How often does the ambulance have to transport? Every race or every other race or? Or maybe you aren't even aware if more than 1 ambulance is on duty, the event doesn't have to wait for the return.

at the track I go to it's rare that someone gets taken to the hospital. A few crashes but rarely does someone need to be carried away. Must be because we know our limits.

Jumps and not enough track workers on practice days.  Whoops at the local level are also a problem.  If every jump was a table top it would help but not eliminate injuries.  If there were enough track workers to flag for a downed rider in a blind spot that would help a lot.  My 3 big injuries were 1. huge whoops only suitable for a professional SX race, 2. A big double that I shorted (my fault but if it was a table top it would have been fine) and 3. a blind jump where I landed only to run over a downed riders motorcycle laying right where I landed. If there had been a flagger working that jump I would have known.

Flaggers? Grooming? What's that? During the week I can't tell if I'm on the track or wandered onto a trail.

Flaggers? Grooming? What's that? During the week I can't tell if I'm on the track or wandered onto a trail.

Even on weekends, MX tracks are minimally manned, maintained, and funded in the Carolinas.

I was riding and cased a double. Flipped over the handlebars and the bike landed on me. Tore a muscle in my shoulder. Luckily it was my last day of my week long trail ride out in Utah.

"blind" doubles are always sketchy for me the first handful of times around. Even after that I usually don't feel comfortable on them for awhile. I like to see the top of the landing before I hit the face of the takeoff.

me being 44 and just getting back into the sport after many years.  It is very scary to see the tracks around me.    I ride smart , I know I have to go to work every day and I have responsibilities.  When I was younger I didn't think like that , but also the track scene wasn't what it is now.  We rode trails and fields and small tracks we made.   Doubles, Triples, ya I don't think so.

Id love to see more tracks for beginners, Im not saying take away all the other stuff as I know there are people that are people that can handle it.    

We don't get many doubles down here, our governing body is pretty tough on safety (too much often) but, a double/triple/quad is very unforgiving when you get 'em wrong. I think if the question is what obstacle creates the most serious injuries that would be it. I personally love big jumps, and it is possible to make 'em without making them doubles. Tabletops as mentioned, and nothing beats the thrill of launching over the top of a blind hill. We're out there to go fast, not put on a stuntshow.

Oh, and the 'don't jump them' thing doesn't work when you're trying to win a race....

Edited by DEATH_INC.

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