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colerlone

Is blue coolant like engine ice?

22 posts in this topic

I bought a 13 yz450f 2 weeks ago, and the coolant looks blue. Is that similar to engine ice? It does get hot when im hill climbing sometimes, i put one of those thermometer stickers on the left radiator

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Engine Ice is not much more than premixed propylene glycol coolant.  Under a 16 pound cap (1.1 bar), it will boil at about 270-275 ℉.  Anything lower than 255 ℉ is safe operating temperature. 

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My 16' WR450 came new with blue colored coolant. So I think Yamaha has some blue coolant instead of green from the factory.


Just curious what temp are they supposed to run at? What temp is hot?

 

Boil over is too hot.

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Boil over is too hot.

Can't boil over be because there is too much coolant also? My 426 boils over pretty often, even while riding. It has engine ice , and a boyesen high flow water pump, but it still boils over sometimes. It did yesterday when I got home from a pretty hard ride, not sure if it had been boiling over the whole time or just when I got home and let it idle for a second while I opened my gate.

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If you fill it to the top, just warming up to 255 will force some coolant out due to expansion, but the coolant level should settle out right about where the cold coolant is just at the tops of the radiator core tubes.  If it drops lower than that, or ejects coolant when set at that level, it's either overheating or your cap is weak.

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If you fill it to the top, just warming up to 255 will force some coolant out due to expansion, but the coolant level should settle out right about where the cold coolant is just at the tops of the radiator core tubes. If it drops lower than that, or ejects coolant when set at that level, it's either overheating or your cap is weak.

I also just replaced the rad cap with a 2.0 bar cap I think it is. So I know the cap isn't weak. Will check the cold coolant level and see where it's at when I get home. If it's down to the proper level when cold, why would it still be boiling over?

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I also just replaced the rad cap with a 2.0 bar cap I think it is. So I know the cap isn't weak. Will check the cold coolant level and see where it's at when I get home. If it's down to the proper level when cold, why would it still be boiling over?

Check to make sure you have at least 50% coolant or more if it boils.  I'm not sure about Engine Ice or it's boiling point?

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If it's down to the proper level when cold, why would it still be boiling over?

 

You may have a clogged or calcium coated radiator impeding cooling, poor circulation, or you could have a combustion leak (most always from a head gasket).  Any of those may cause it to overheat.  In the case of a head gasket, it doesn't have to overheat to expel coolant, as it pumps the cooling system full of over the limit pressure.

 

It could also be just a matter of not moving fast enough if this is happening in tighter trail sections where your speed is down to under ten MPH for any length of time.  The radiators need air flow.

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You may have a clogged or calcium coated radiator impeding cooling, poor circulation, or you could have a combustion leak (most always from a head gasket). Any of those may cause it to overheat. In the case of a head gasket, it doesn't have to overheat to expel coolant, as it pumps the cooling system full of over the limit pressure.

It could also be just a matter of not moving fast enough if this is happening in tighter trail sections where your speed is down to under ten MPH for any length of time. The radiators need air flow.

Alright, so would sitting at idle for about 30 seconds after a hard ride build enough heat to boil over? I think that's probably all it was, next time I ride ill try to watch it and see if it's boiling while riding.

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Depending on how hot it was right before you pulled up ans sat at idle, 30 seconds could be plenty of time for that on a 426.  They'll blow coolant in right around a minute from a cold start sometimes if they just sit.

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I will change it out to engine ice before I ride it again. I thought maybe another brand offered the same benefits but with blue instead of purple. mine spit up a little the other day, but I also just dropped the bike on the side. maybe that did it. But my sticker being on the left radiator, I don't think it gets the flow of the right. But there wasn't a good visible spot on the right one to put the thermometer sticker

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They'll seriously blow coolant in a minute flat from a cold start? I don't know mine well enough to be sure, but I would've sworn it took a few minutes to even get the radiators warm enough I can't reasonably hold my hand on them, let alone boil over.

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But just to be clear engine ice will make mine run cooler correct? Im guessing it is better than stock coolant

Yes. It definitely will, my bike runs quite a bit cool with the engine ice and high flow water pump. With regular coolant in it, it would boil over after about 10-30 seconds in cold start up. Now it usually won't boil over at all. It can sit and idle for as long as you want it seems like, and won't boil over, once the coolant level is down to where it doesn't expand and cause so much pressure that it bleeds out. Which is my problem still, coolant level is a little high still, so mine will boil over a little bit until it gets to the right level. Edited by 0bigsilver6

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Is it not an issue of being too lean if it gets hot that fast? I had an 08 before my 13, it would make the header glow after a couple minutes of idling with the choke on, but for the engine to actually warm up took at least 10 min of riding

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Engine Ice will not cool the engine better than any other kind of coolant.  It does have a slightly higher (~5-7 degrees) boil point than the green ethylene glycol coolants, but that's it.  Straight water actually cools better than any coolant mix, but it will boil at around 230-240 under a pressure cap. 

 

Coolant has nothing to do with whether the header glows or not.  That's mostly normal.  If it glows quicker than normal, it's usually because of a too fast idle.  Since it can be aggravated by leaving the choke on as the bike warms up, blaming it on being lean at idle doesn't really hold up.

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Engine Ice will not cool the engine better than any other kind of coolant. It does have a slightly higher (~5-7 degrees) boil point than the green ethylene glycol coolants, but that's it. Staright water actually cools better than any coolant mix, but it will boil at around 230-240 under a pressure cap.

Coolant has nothing to do with whether the header glows or not. That's mostly normal. aif it glows quicker than normal, it's usually because of a too fast idle. Since it can be aggravated by leaving the choke on as the bike warms up, blaming it on being lean at idle doesn't really hold up.

I guess user experience depends with the engine ice. It solved my problem with boiling over before I put the high flow water pump on. I don't know if it made it drop the advertised 30* running temp, but it seemed to help quite a bit.

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Yes. It definitely will, my bike runs quite a bit cool with the engine ice and high flow water pump. With regular coolant in it, it would boil over after about 10-30 seconds in cold start up. Now it usually won't boil over at all. It can sit and idle for as long as you want it seems like, and won't boil over, once the coolant level is down to where it doesn't expand and cause so much pressure that it bleeds out. Which is my problem still, coolant level is a little high still, so mine will boil over a little bit until it gets to the right level.

I'm amazed that people get boil-over in 30 seconds. I would've expected at least 5 minutes from a cold start (unless cold start means sitting in the sun in 110F weather or something like that, but still wouldn't expect 30s). 

 

Engine Ice may well prevent boil-over, but as straight water has a higher heat capacity than anything else it'll run cooler on straight water (unless you're boiling over). The water moves the heat from the engine to the radiators more efficiently, it just boils at a lower temp too.

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