Lowering 2016 WR450

Well I am pretty sure no one has lowered one since they are barley out. But I was at the Anaheim Supercross this last Saturday and noticed the supercross bikes seem to be lower suspended than the ones we buy.

I have read where some people on the late model YZ450's use a lowering link in the rear to get a bit better handling. I understand the better way is to internally lower the shock and not mess with the geometry of the link.

Here is a picture I took of Cooper Webb's winning YZ250f bike notice the travel of the forks and shock. All of the bikes look lowered by the way and I understand most of the riders are not giants.  Supercross_zpszzwykpxy.jpg

 

Compare it to a new WR/YZ suspended bike. Especially in the rear.  New%20bike_zpsbfjzury3.jpg

Nice looking bike.  Unless you are super short, I would not lower it.  If you absolutely need to, then I am sure someone will come out with a lower link for the rear.  Never have the front tubes cut.  You will regret it every time you blow the seals out on a full compression hit.

Lower it internally and your done... It's no secret...

Those guys also use other tricks like modded subframes and internal shock mods. Hard to tell what they did just by looking at it on the stand. If it were my bike I'd spring it for me, set the sag, and go ride the hell out of it (and then come back here and tell everybody how it was). And I wouldn't make the decision to lower it based on a bike set up for SX, but I might call Ride Engineering to hear their take on the idea for that bike/chassis for offroad.

Those guys also use other tricks like modded subframes and internal shock mods. Hard to tell what they did just by looking at it on the stand. If it were my bike I'd spring it for me, set the sag, and go ride the hell out of it (and then come back here and tell everybody how it was). And I wouldn't make the decision to lower it based on a bike set up for SX, but I might call Ride Engineering to hear their take on the idea for that bike/chassis for offroad.

Curious to know what you would recommend Ride Engineering? They don't build bikes for offroad, they make triple clamps and a bit of bolt on bling. Nothing more then that...

I've talked with the NFAB offroad regarding setup and if anyone knows better it would be them...

Curious to know what you would recommend Ride Engineering? They don't build bikes for offroad, they make triple clamps and a bit of bolt on bling. Nothing more then that...

I've talked with the NFAB offroad regarding setup and if anyone knows better it would be them...

Nah, Ride Engineering makes all kinds of stuff beyond triples and bling. I do not have experience with them yet, but have been looking into their lowering link for my YZ250. I've read plenty about it and the benefits extend beyond its MX application into offroad. Ride Eng, Pro Circuit, NFAB, Devol, YamaLink, Mountain Engineering and probably others all make them - I just used Ride Eng as an example since that's the one in particular I was looking at.

http://www.btosports.com/p/RIDELINK

Nah, Ride Engineering makes all kinds of stuff beyond triples and bling. I do not have experience with them yet, but have been looking into their lowering link for my YZ250. I've read plenty about it and the benefits extend beyond its MX application into offroad. Ride Eng, Pro Circuit, NFAB, Devol, YamaLink, Mountain Engineering and probably others all make them - I just used Ride Eng as an example since that's the one in particular I was looking at.http://www.btosports.com/p/RIDELINK

Interesting lots of sources for the lowering link and even a bit of tuning advice as the links do change the geometry. However my suspicion is the better way is as Monk suggest's to lower it internally and not change the geometry of the link. I have done it in the past with Racetech lowering spacers in the rear. The front gets more overlap of the fork tubes so there is no cutting involved.

JGR also sells their service to cut the sub frame and lower it a bit as well. However I need to install my 140/80 IRC M5B tire of choice and see how close it comes to the fender when bottomed.

Interesting lots of sources for the lowering link and even a bit of tuning advice as the links do change the geometry. However my suspicion is the better way is as Monk suggest's to lower it internally and not change the geometry of the link. I have done it in the past with Racetech lowering spacers in the rear. The front gets more overlap of the fork tubes so there is no cutting involved.

JGR also sells their service to cut the sub frame and lower it a bit as well. However I need to install my 140/80 IRC M5B tire of choice and see how close it comes to the fender when bottomed.

Just curious, are you lowering the bike to modify the handling or because you need it lower physically?

Just curious, are you lowering the bike to modify the handling or because you need it lower physically?

 

I'm a 5'7" midget that rides some extremely technical stuff. So I'm not trying to mess with the handling.  

Ah, ok. I didn't catch that. Well, lots of options between shock, subframe, and shaving the seat. Does shortening the shock stroke reduce the suspension travel? I'd hate to give that up, but I know it just depends on what works best for the overall package.

Ah, ok. I didn't catch that. Well, lots of options between shock, subframe, and shaving the seat. Does shortening the shock stroke reduce the suspension travel? I'd hate to give that up, but I know it just depends on what works best for the overall package.

Yes shortening the shock directly reduces travel. There isn't much to shave on the seat as it's pretty thin. I just ordered soft seat foam and a ribbed cover from Guts seats. The soft foam should bring me a little closer to the ground as you settle into the seat more. It's the same seat as the YZ450f

Edited by stevethe

Steve your new bike looking good.Off topic,but you also told me.New bike can idle super low,good for hard single track.My 11 Wr lowered 1 inch spacers in shock.Works Ok,but you can tell its lowered.Rode Customers 12 wr with revalved susp.Lowering link in rear(I know you guys hate them).It worked perfect,no tire rub in rear.Handled great Single track(No woops).I was amazed that,it worked better then mine. 

I'm a 5'7" midget that rides some extremely technical stuff. So I'm not trying to mess with the handling.  

I am shorter than you, I had my seat done by Fisher http://www.fishersaddlebags.com/seats.htmlon my 2014wr, they were able to get more than an inch and they widened it slightly for better comfort. Helped me a lot. Those guys are great, little pricey but worth it IMO.

 

Lowering links have not worked out well for me, they always change the handling in my experience. Maybe suspension pros can do a better job but messing with the geometry has its limits IMHO.

 

A good training program aerobics, weights, and stretches oriented toward riding difficulties helped me a ton. Plus, lot of slow and static practice in my garage in the off season which was boring but helpful (was a tip I think I got from syncro over in the trials or off road riding forum). :ride:

The big mini bike. I decided to try a Devol lowering link partly because the bike is relativity stiff for my 160 lbs. and lowering links soften the suspension. I also don't want the suspension at the shop just yet. I wanna ride.  :ride:  I used the 1.25" Devol lowering link they also sell the 3/4" one. Pro Circuit and many others also sell a 3/4" lowering link for better handling. I was only able to raise the forks 20mm toward the bars. This may equate to approximately using the 3/4" link and not pushing up the forks. Time will tell if it's a poor handler or not. Low_zpsslxrmdln.jpg

The big mini bike. I decided to try a Devol lowering link partly because the bike is relativity stiff for my 160 lbs. and lowering links soften the suspension. I also don't want the suspension at the shop just yet. I wanna ride. :ride: I used the 1.25" Devol lowering link they also sell the 3/4" one. Pro Circuit and many others also sell a 3/4" lowering link for better handling. I was only able to raise the forks 20mm toward the bars. This may equate to approximately using the 3/4" link and not pushing up the forks. Time will tell if it's a poor handler or not. Low_zpsslxrmdln.jpg

Lowering link makes the rear stiffer...

MXA would say otherwise...

"The longer arm achieves three things: First, it stiffens up the initial part of the linkage’s rising rate curve (longer arms don’t change the bell crank-derived curve; they only change the starting point). Second, a longer link arm lowers the rear of the bike, which in turn kicks out the head angle to allow for more setup possibilities. Third, with the rear of the bike lower, the rider can slide his forks up and down in the triple clamps to tune the handling and eliminate the wiggle"

http://motocrossactionmag.com/bike-tests/yamaha-tests/mxa-team-tested-pro-circuit-yamaha-yz450f-shock-linkage

Edited by Monk

MXA would say otherwise...

"The longer arm achieves three things: First, it stiffens up the initial part of the linkage’s rising rate curve (longer arms don’t change the bell crank-derived curve; they only change the starting point). Second, a longer link arm lowers the rear of the bike, which in turn kicks out the head angle to allow for more setup possibilities. Third, with the rear of the bike lower, the rider can slide his forks up and down in the triple clamps to tune the handling and eliminate the wiggle"

http://motocrossactionmag.com/bike-tests/yamaha-tests/mxa-team-tested-pro-circuit-yamaha-yz450f-shock-linkage

 

:facepalm: Not sure. I was always under the impression that longer links made more leverage on the spring. This seems to describe needing a stiffer spring (more leverage) also says the link is softer on square edge bumps. http://www.motorcycleloweringlinks.com/index.php?content=wr_lowering_yz_lowering_faqs

 

MXA would say otherwise...

"The longer arm achieves three things: First, it stiffens up the initial part of the linkage’s rising rate curve (longer arms don’t change the bell crank-derived curve; they only change the starting point). Second, a longer link arm lowers the rear of the bike, which in turn kicks out the head angle to allow for more setup possibilities. Third, with the rear of the bike lower, the rider can slide his forks up and down in the triple clamps to tune the handling and eliminate the wiggle"

http://motocrossactionmag.com/bike-tests/yamaha-tests/mxa-team-tested-pro-circuit-yamaha-yz450f-shock-linkage

 

:facepalm: Not sure. I was always under the impression that longer links made more leverage on the spring. This seems to describe needing a stiffer spring (more leverage) also says the link is softer on square edge bumps. http://www.motorcycleloweringlinks.com/index.php?content=wr_lowering_yz_lowering_faqs

 

You can only tell by riding and testing yourself IMHO.  I think I tried devol on my honda and for sure yamalink on my yam. Didn't end up using them though.

You can only tell by riding and testing yourself IMHO. I think I tried devol on my honda and for sure yamalink on my yam. Didn't end up using them though.

Well there is only one answer, so someone is wrong and someone is right...

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