Can you Heli-coil a oil drain plug?

Welp, change my oil over the weekend and had an oil at the drain plug. Threads are pretty worn out. Wondering if it is a good idea to heli-coil the drain plug to get a better fitment?

Time-sert might work better

Can you explain what exactly that is and how it can be implemented?

Can you explain what exactly that is and how it can be implemented?

 

http://www.timesert.com/

 

Time-Serts work better for things like drain plugs because:

 

  1. They have no "pigtail" to worry about breaking off and retrieving
  2. They do not tend to pull the top thread free of the bore when the bolt is removed multiple times
  3. The tooling includes a spot facing cutter that ensures that the top of the hole where the washer sits is square with the hole itself, which allows more certain sealing

Is it also a good idea to use Yamaseal or some kind of sealant to stop any and all leaks on the outside of the time-sert?

Now all I got to do is find a kit and someone more steady in the hand and proficient at this than me. Thanks!

Is it also a good idea to use Yamaseal or some kind of sealant to stop any and all leaks on the outside of the time-sert?

 

 

Yes, but I'd use Loc-Tite instead:

 

http://www.timesert.com/html/faq.html#26

Does anyone know the size I need for the 2002 WR426 drain plug time-sert bolt?

The drain below the stator/flywheel housing on the crankcase is in fact an M12x1.5

Thank you and I appreciate it. Looks like they do have that size for the kit.

ive had my drain heli coiled for a couple years now with no problems.

It is quite possible to get a Heli-Coil into place as a drain plug repair and have it work perfectly.  It's also easier than you'd hope it would be to have it fail on any of the three counts I offered, all of which a Time-Sert addresses.  Heli-Coils are great, and I use them all them time, but Time-Serts do make a more certain drain plug repair that has less potential to leak or fail with repeated use.

Possibly a statement of the obvious, but this is one tapped hole where you dont want to leave many, if any, metal chips behind when you drill or whatever

I plan on using a air hose at 15psi from the oil line and rowter adaptor with a shop vac near the drill to collect all shavings. Then afterwards use some cheap oil and kerosene to run it for a few minutes and flush it out. Well, that is what my thought is to get all the shavings out and away from disaster..

One nice thing about the way the drain is located on this particular engine is that if you take the simple and fairly easy step of removing the generator cover, you can get right at the inside of the drain hole. 

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