2015 Yamaha 450 Shifting Problems

Hi, My 2015 Yamaha 450, has a really tough shift throughout its gear, and periodically goes into a false neutral when i try and shift gears, bike is brand new with 2.0 hours, and I ran Yamalube oil then switched to Bel-Ray and still have the same problem... 

 

If anyone has any help please feel free to comment! 

I would contact the dealer.

I had a similar problem. Every so often I would hit neutral. After about 10hrs things ran perfect...

Take it back

Is this the first new YZ you've had?

I rode brand new YZ last year, and my Dad is the dealer and none of our mechanics can figure it out either..

Give it a few more hours and see what shakes.

My 2014 YZ450 does the same thing from 3rd to 4th. 35 hours on it and seems worse than when it was new. I just concentrate on giving the shifter a positive push up.

Adjust the shifter down a bit so you click it up easier that may solve it. My 14 seems to shift fine. I hit neutral from time to time but it's my fault when I do lol

I did lower the shift lever 1notch and it did help. Thanks

Go for the isotropic tumbling. Pro Circuit does it as well as some other shops. They basically take your gears and tumble them. It's about $350, but you're bike will shift much smoother. All factory bikes have it done. Even the new KTM factory edition has them tumbled and coated.

You should be aware that "isotropic tumbling" is state of condition/motion in molecular chemistry, and not a mechanical process that can be applied to a gear of other parts?  The polishing process, "tumbling", will also not induce such molecular activity in parts so treated, either.

 

In any event, tumbling or otherwise polishing only the gears won't do much to improve shifting, since the gears themselves are seldom the main source of the friction that impedes it.  Only the splined centers of the "sliders", the gears that are moved along the trans shafts to accomplish the shift, and the splines of the shaft on which they move, can improve that motion by being polished.  It does help some, but unless the shift fork follower pins and the interior sides of the shift cam are also polished, the major source of resistance would be overlooked.

You should be aware that "isotropic tumbling" is state of condition/motion in molecular chemistry, and not a mechanical process that can be applied to a gear of other parts? The polishing process, "tumbling", will also not induce such molecular activity in parts so treated, either.

In any event, tumbling or otherwise polishing only the gears won't do much to improve shifting, since the gears themselves are seldom the main source of the friction that impedes it. Only the splined centers of the "sliders", the gears that are moved along the trans shafts to accomplish the shift, and the splines of the shaft on which they move, can improve that motion by being polished. It does help some, but unless the shift fork follower pins and the interior sides of the shift cam are also polished, the major source of resistance would be overlooked.

So just out of curiosity why is the process done on every factory bike and mostly all pro riders bikes. It seems you have a little knowledge in the field but if I'm reading right you're saying that the process is a waste of money & further will damage your bike. Without sounding condescending (which email can come across without tone to it) why do they do this then?

"Further damage"?  Where do you see that?  I think you need to reread my second paragraph.  Tumbling or other polishing of these parts is beneficial, it's just not going to make as big a difference as $3-400 might be expected to make.  The factories can afford to do that kind of mechanical hair-splitting, so they do.

 

My point in the first place is that attaching the name "isotropic" to the polishing process called tumbling is just pure BS to make it sound more special than having a rock store do the same thing.

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