2013 YZ470F Nitrous Install (pics)

So maybe 8-10min of 30hp boost? That would work for me :) How much was the whole ordeal?

I would say 5-10 minutes would be doable. With a snowbike setup you could look into a bigger bottle too... I did notice it uses fuel much faster while spraying. The whole kit cost $450. Call Cold Fusion 1-281-304-1515, tell them you want a single cylinder, efi, wet kit, for a fuel system with 45psi. T

You willing to give the 50hp a shot?

The bike rips my man!

Im going to stay with the 20hp shot his season. Mainly because I cant afford to lose a motor mid season. 20hp is crazy fast as is!! Over the winter I am going do a full rebuild with stronger components, stroke, bore, and all. Then I will try the 40hp jets.  My goal is to build a single cylinder bike that makes 100+ hp and is somewhat reliable.

Nice work buddy thumbs up. 100+ hp would be a pretty insane pwr

Im going to stay with the 20hp shot his season. Mainly because I cant afford to lose a motor mid season. 20hp is crazy fast as is!! Over the winter I am going do a full rebuild with stronger components, stroke, bore, and all. Then I will try the 40hp jets.  My goal is to build a single cylinder bike that makes 100+ hp and is somewhat reliable.

The turbo snowbikes are about 100hp with way way more load on the motor and all the time. I think you can build up a motor and be pretty reliable with a 40hp jet.

Any other hill climbers using nos?

The turbo snowbikes are about 100hp with way way more load on the motor and all the time.

 

Turbocharging does not subject the engine to any greater load than normal until and unless the manifold pressure (boost) rises above 0.  Because turbos are exhaust driven, they only boost when there is adequate exhaust volume to spin them fast enough to produce positive pressure in the intake, and that only happens when the throttle is opened far enough for the engine to produce that much exhaust.  The boost only produces an extra load while it's being used, same as nitrous. 

 

The load is also not any greater on the engine than the power being produced, so it isn't necessarily any more load, never mind "way more".

Turbocharging does not subject the engine to any greater load than normal until and unless the manifold pressure (boost) rises above 0. Because turbos are exhaust driven, they only boost when there is adequate exhaust volume to spin them fast enough to produce positive pressure in the intake, and that only happens when the throttle is opened far enough for the engine to produce that much exhaust. The boost only produces an extra load while it's being used, same as nitrous.

The load is also not any greater on the engine than the power being produced, so it isn't necessarily any more load, never mind "way more".

wat puts alot more load on the engine is not the turbo but the fact that its driving a track which has alot more drag than a wheel no?

Turbo vs. nitrous.  Nothing to do with whether it has a track kit or not.

O ic hes comparing the turbo to nos? My bad

He may have been comparing a turbo snow bike to a nitrous climber, but his statement created an impression that could have been taken to mean that turbo charging was more stressful than nitrous.  It isn't, and in fact, it's usually a lot less stressful, even when it produces more power.  I was simply clearing the misconception up.

No worries. I just took it as him saying the turbo snowbikes have 100 + hp and are still reliable even having much more load on the engine over a dirtbike

The problem with a turbo on a Snowbike is that there is less power off the line, and once the turbo spools up it spins the track and sends you straight to the rev limiter. Nitrous gives you more linear power that is easier to control and stay off the rev limiter. A lot of people with turbo Snowbikes blow them up from sitting at the rev limiter too much because it is the easy thing to do

Thanks for all you replies and discussion. I can't run a turbo, but nitrous is legal so that why I set the bike up this way. I previously built a CR500 that had a 20HP shot of "dry" NOS. Meaning NOS sprayed into the air boot and "blew" extra fuel, from the carb, into the cylinder. It worked... kinda. This setup is light years better because of the ability to spray pressurized fuel and NOS in a metered, adjustable, consistent manner.  Next week I will be in Billings, MT for the Big Sky Pro Challenge. Hopefully then I will have some vid of the bike in competition :thumbsup:

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