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Wr822

Best mods for woods riding a yz?

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Hey guys just picked a 09 yz450, Im coming off my trusty WR and was basically lookin to drop the weight of the heavy girl. Sooo I need to know what the best modifications I can do to make it more friendly in the woods, I race harescrambles and don't do much track but I might do a little more now that I have a bike that has the ability to do so. Thanks!

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Protection items (skid plate, radiator braces, hand guards at a minimum), oversized tank, and suspension that's revalved for woods.

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I just bought the same bike.  From what I have read a 10oz flywheel weight helps too.  Going up 1 or 2 teeth on the rear sprocket

Edited by eruption

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Protection items (skid plate, radiator braces, hand guards at a minimum), oversized tank, and suspension that's revalved for woods.

 

I've only been riding 1.5 years on my 2008 YZ450, so yea i'm still wet behind the ears. But i ride in rocky desert and primarily in woods, no racing. (I love the woods, but no cliffs please!) But like cowboy stated i have all that and it's saved me a lot on replacing parts and breaking down miles from my truck. I would recommend the the ricochet skid plate only for one reason and thats to protect the front sides, i don't know how many times I've clipped something and if it wasn't for that id have holes in my engine. another thing i did was  i went up on teeth to a 51 due to the steep hills and such i ride in. 

Edited by Counter-Seal

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Yea I'm getting the GYTR 9.7 ounce over stock flywheel and a DEVOL skid plate and bark busters for starters. Just trying to figure out my jetting and she should be ready to go till I decide to do recluse, also gonna to do my forks soon, seals are leaking a little so I'll have them revalved then

Edited by Wr822

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I agree with all the suggestions and I would add a g2 throttle tube I have an 08 just for single track and very technical and with these mods works well but will pull hills whenever u need. The flywheel weight will make the most noticeable difference but can always go to a 12 tooth front if doesn't slow it enough

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Yea with my gearing(13/49) 2nd seems to be a little high for tight technical stuff because I keep stalling it but that could be jetting. And I assume the flywheel weight will help with that. Is the flywheel pretty easy to swap out?

Edited by Wr822

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Yea with my gearing(13/49) 2nd seems to be a little high for tight technical stuff because I keep stalling it but that could be jetting. And I assume the flywheel weight will help with that. Is the flywheel pretty easy to swap out?

Flywheel is easy with a puller. I was able to reuse the gasket. It will help tremendously with stalling and makes it a little easier to start.

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I just bought the gytr 9 oz from Rocky Mountain. It came with the gasket and it was only about $90. You have to have the puller though. I went one tooth up on the rear but I'm stock on front. Way too high geared.

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What coyboyona said. Don't consider a rekluse until you have mastered the clutch. Took me a long time but now I rarely stall, and after trying a rekluse I pulled it and won't run one again. I run stock jetting and that seems to work best around here

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What coyboyona said. Don't consider a rekluse until you have mastered the clutch. Took me a long time but now I rarely stall, and after trying a rekluse I pulled it and won't run one again.

 

I would suggest otherwise.  I was pretty comfortable for a long time with a manual clutch on 4 different YZF's.  But, and it may be partly because I'm a bit older, the Rekluse has seriously improved the bike's ability to negotiate low speed, rocky, nasty tight stuff in low gear without having to lower the overall gearing at all, and without absorbing any mental energy or concentration on anything but throttle control, steering, and balance.  That's important to me, because I need both that capability as well as that of being able to run at 70+ mph for extended periods in other sections without giving the engine a hernia. 

 

The Rekluse isn't for everyone, and many of the people who try one don't take the time or put in the effort to set it up right for their circumstances and to re-learn how to ride with it.  The best performance at low speed comes when you ignore the lever and let the clutch do all the work, but some guys just can't keep their hands off it.   If you're not sure you'll like it, you should look for one to try out.  It's undeniably cool to be able to go for a 40 minute trail ride and only start the bike once at the beginning of it.

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Aside from the bolt-on protective items I would say the best mods you can make for woods riding are:

#1 Get your suspension valved & sprung for your weight and riding terrain.

#2 Install a Rekluse clutch. I have been riding/racing dirtbikes since 1974. Using a manual clutch is second nature to me...but why would I when Rekluse makes such a great product?

Avoid gearing your bike lower if at all possible. It makes the bike jerkier and limits the range of each gear.

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I would suggest otherwise.  I was pretty comfortable for a long time with a manual clutch on 4 different YZF's.  But, and it may be partly because I'm a bit older, the Rekluse has seriously improved the bike's ability to negotiate low speed, rocky, nasty tight stuff in low gear without having to lower the overall gearing at all, and without absorbing any mental energy or concentration on anything but throttle control, steering, and balance.  That's important to me, because I need both that capability as well as that of being able to run at 70+ mph for extended periods in other sections without giving the engine a hernia. 

 

The Rekluse isn't for everyone, and many of the people who try one don't take the time or put in the effort to set it up right for their circumstances and to re-learn how to ride with it.  The best performance at low speed comes when you ignore the lever and let the clutch do all the work, but some guys just can't keep their hands off it.   If you're not sure you'll like it, you should look for one to try out.  It's undeniably cool to be able to go for a 40 minute trail ride and only start the bike once at the beginning of it.

 

 

I tried a Z Start Pro for a whole year on my Yamaha , playing with it constantly. On my Husaberg it came with a Core EXP 3.0. Both cases I ended up going without them and I have improved my riding dramatically as a result. If you ever ride up north I want to see how you have yours set up. I ride tech st and tend to ride the clutch hard.

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I tried a Z Start Pro for a whole year on my Yamaha , playing with it constantly. On my Husaberg it came with a Core EXP 3.0. Both cases I ended up going without them and I have improved my riding dramatically as a result. If you ever ride up north I want to see how you have yours set up. I ride tech st and tend to ride the clutch hard.

I had the Pro on my 09 and never touched it. This is the norm.

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My first experience with a Rekluse was on a friends 2007 CRF450. I rode maybe a mile into the woods and had stalled it several times to my disappointment. I turn around and headed back to camp and never rode it again as I thought what a waste. BUT, I bought a friends 2009 KTM 300XCW with a Rekluse that I was told that I could still use the manual clutch if I wanted. Oh, did I forget to mention that the Honda I rode did not have any manual clutch action so that was when I found out there was two models of this Rekluse. I ended up racing three full years of the local Harescramble series along with all my annull rides in Colorado and NOT ONCE had I ever adjusted ANYTHING nor to this day never had to replace any plates. Now I know there is an even better model called the Core 3.0 and I have it in my 2012 WR450 and am now waiting patiently for my Core3.0 to come in for my newest ride, the YZ250FX. I always use the manual clutch and usually 75% into a 60 plus mile Enduro I end up relying on the Rekluse which help concentrating on other things tremendously.

CONCLUSIONS:

If you had a bad experience with a Rekluse it is probably because you have the cheaper end model and it does take more set up and maintenance. BUT, the Core3.0 is the easiest one to install and IF/WHEN you need to make an adjustment it LITERALLY takes minutes and it is like turning your suspension clicker if you will. I will NEVER race or ride a bike with anything BUT the Core3.0. There is no more ball bearings to mess with. I can't express how simple it really is to use and set up.

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The EXP series doesn't use balls, but it does have weights "to mess with" all the same, and it's tinkering with springs and weights that allows you to tune and dial in either design.  People who do not take the time to fiddle with this, see the effect of each change, and select the setup that best suits their style who are most often dissatisfied with the clutch.

 

Once again, though, not for everyone. 

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I recently put a Core EXP 3.0 in my '09 YZ450.  I use it mainly for it's anti-stall benefit.  It comes in real handy when you have arm pump and when doing trail maintenance.  I still use the clutch lever 90% of the time when I'm riding aggressively because I want the rear to freewheel instantly at higher rpm sometimes and the Rekluse doesn't react fast enough if you simply let off the gas.  I also like to modulate the torque with the clutch lever in the corners/tight turns to get a more instant hit.

 

 

I love the Rekluse for covering up my mistakes.  Even with a heavy flywheel weight and a 51T rear sprocket, the YZ stalls too easily without the Rekluse and kickstarting on hot YZ is sometimes aggravating.

 

I had made the mistake of getting the cheaper EXP 2.0 a couple of years ago and was disappointed.

Edited by Navaho6

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I still use the clutch lever 90% of the time when I'm riding aggressively because I want the rear to freewheel instantly at higher rpm sometimes and the Rekluse doesn't react fast enough if you simply let off the gas.

None of the Rekluse clutches freewheel or release on deceleration.  They are engaged or disengaged only by engine speed, and will only release when the engine has slowed enough to allow it.  If you wanted a clutch that freewheels on decel, you bought the wrong product. 

 

Engine braking is far more beneficial than detrimental in any case. 

 

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