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Ridein

What front Sprocket to run with Ironman rear and vt2?

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Time for a new chain ring setup. I already bought an Ironman rear, D.I.Dvt2, but I'm on the fence about what counter sprocket to run? With so many front options, I have no clue? The only two that really stick out at me is ether the Supersprox or Talon, but really I'm open to any brand. My major concern is the F/R alignment, I vaguely remember this being an issue on 06 YZ450 with Renthals fronts.         

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I've run several different brand front sprockets with the Ironman rear, and an oring chain, and none of them out lasted the Ironman and o-ring chain.

 

Is the D.I.D. vt2 an oring chain?

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Well, I found a great deal on ebay for a new DIRT TRICKS IRONMAN FRONT SPROCKET - 13 T for $18! So, I pulled the trigger. From all the reviews I've read, I'd like to think using an Ironman f/r and D.I.Dvt2 setup, I won't be needing a new chainring setup for awhile.  

Edited by Ridein
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Well, I found a great deal on ebay for a new DIRT TRICKS IRONMAN FRONT SPROCKET - 13 T for $18! So, I pulled the trigger. From all the reviews I've read, I'd like to think using an Ironman f/r and D.I.Dvt2 setup, I won't be needing a new chainring setup for awhile.  

 

That combo will give you good service, but be careful you don't over tighten your chain.  It will kill all three, and possibly damage the transmission output shaft.  Too loose is better than too tight.

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That combo will give you good service, but be careful you don't over tighten your chain.  It will kill all three, and possibly damage the transmission output shaft.  Too loose is better than too tight.

 

With the Ironman sprocket, that mistake can also take out your rear hub.

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/753999-renthal-twinring-wear/page-2#entry7755212

 

hubbreak.jpg

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Chain too tight to allow the swing arm to pass through center swing.  Something has to give, and in this case, the chain folded the sprocket over and tore the flange off the hub.  This can happen regardless of which sprocket one uses if the chain's tight enough. 

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That combo will give you good service, but be careful you don't over tighten your chain.  It will kill all three, and possibly damage the transmission output shaft.  Too loose is better than too tight.

Big 10/4 on that!

 

With the Ironman sprocket, that mistake can also take out your rear hub.

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/753999-renthal-twinring-wear/page-2#entry7755212

 

hubbreak.jpg

That’s expense mistake!

 

Let me ask a related question. I understand setting the proper chain slack/tension, but in regards to the rear axle position where should it be, front, center, back? Also, how does adjusting the rear axle forward or backwards affect the handling of the bike?    

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The axle position will be relevant to the chains proper tension.  There is no set place for it to be unless you are trying to produce a certain handling condition.

 

The farther the axle sets back in the swing arm, (longer wheel base), it's generally stabile at higher speeds.

 

Move the axle forward, (shorter wheel base) and it generally turns better in tight turns.

Edited by WALKINGWOUNDED
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The axle position will be relevant to the chains proper tension.  There is no set place for it to be unless you are trying to produce a certain handling condition.

 

The farther the axle sets back in the swing arm, (longer wheel base), it's generally stabile at higher speeds.

 

Move the axle forward, (shorter wheel base) and it generally turns better in tight turns.

Thank you, that's what I was looking for!

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