2012 WR450f suspension is a little squishy...

Hey everyone. So before i got this bike ('12 WR450) my dad and I were oohing and aahing over the supposed "new YZ suspension" for the 2012 model year. Now I will admit that this thing is far and above any older WR I've ridden, and shit it handles like a dream for it's weight, but it's still got that classic WR softness in there. The thing is, I'm a desert/trail guy, and I have taken this thing on the MX track before (because I can, that's why). Essentially, the suspension is feeling just a bit too squishy for me. It's plush and beautiful and it handles oh-so-good, but I need some more bottoming resistance for big hits i take on the trail and for the occasional jumps. Should i  just re-spring it to compensate for the extra weight of the bike compared to the YZ 450, or just turn my compression clickers way harder? Just looking for what others have done or what you suggest.

I think people are going to want to know your weight and your sag numbers to help you out.

 

The good thing about the WR suspension is that its all based on YZ parts.  You can make it do just about anything with some tuning, ie respring and revalve.

 

However, the compression adjuster assembly on the 2012+ WRs is unique to it and the piston in it has 2.4 mm ports, versus 2.8mm for older KYB shocks and 3.0mm for newer ones.  This will create some harshness on high speed hits unless its addressed.

Send it off to Factory Connection.  You will not regret it.

Ride it awhile. That SSS suspension (speed sensitive) gets stiff on hard hits. Yes it's soft while cruising but when I crush big square edges and think in gonna get thrown or am coming short on jumps it stiffens up nice, does not bottom out.Front still remains soft in turns though, making it wash.

FC (among others) will definitely get you set up and make a night/day difference in the feel and "rideability" of your bike, guaranteed. If you don't want to drop the roughly $600-800 for a revalve, you might be able to try different springs and fluid levels for around $200 front and rear and achieve an acceptable set up. But nothing beats a suspension valved/built for your weight, ability, and terrain.

Its way squishy and can only be pushed so hard in stock form. I would suggest springs as a starting point as the

current ones are close to a stock yz and the wr already has approx 30lbs of weight gain.

Its way squishy and can only be pushed so hard in stock form. I would suggest springs as a starting point as the

current ones are close to a stock yz and the wr already has approx 30lbs of weight gain.

Yeah thats what I was thinking. Just respring to compensate for the extra weight of the bike. I guess I'll try that first, I really don't have the money for a respring/valve, though I really would like that. 

At 250 lbs, I got by with the stock springs for a while, but I did bottom it out pretty hard here and there.  I put stiffer springs and that pretty much took care of my issues, though I still bottom from time to time, but it is expected when I do.

Yeah thats what I was thinking. Just respring to compensate for the extra weight of the bike. I guess I'll try that first, I really don't have the money for a respring/valve, though I really would like that. 

 

You don't spring for the weight of the bike, you spring for the weight of the rider. If you're more an about 180-190ish lbs you're definitely going to need new springs. If you need to go up a few springs weights, you'll need to revalve while you're at it as well.

 

The new WR has some of the best suspension on the market, it just needs to be sprung and tuned for rider weight and riding style.

If you are undersprung there's no way to achieve the approximate 100mm of race sag. The stock spring has about a 170 pound limit for appropriate sag range setting. Having said that, yes, a WR is going to be "soft" ridden aggressively and not to mention on the MX track due to valving.

 

Sag is as sag does. The rest is fine tuning compression, rebound and valving.

You don't spring for the weight of the bike, you spring for the weight of the rider.

So its not the spring that keeps the forks in the correct part of the stroke, its the valving?

Springs and valving compliment each other.  If the spring is too soft or way too heavy, it's not going to matter much what you do with the valving.  The springs provide uniform compression and rebound while the valving cause more or less (variable) resistance during different parts of the stroke. 

Edited by mch

So its not the spring that keeps the forks in the correct part of the stroke, its the valving?

No the spring is what keeps the forks in the right part of the stroke. What I meant was, nobody says 'this bike weighs X, so it needs Y spring rate'. More like 'this rider weighs X, so needs a Y spring rate in that bike'. The bike's weight does obviously play a part there as it's sprung weight (minus the wheels etc) but when talking about getting correct spring rates, it's the rider's weight that matters.

No the spring is what keeps the forks in the right part of the stroke. What I meant was, nobody says 'this bike weighs X, so it needs Y spring rate'. More like 'this rider weighs X, so needs a Y spring rate in that bike'. The bike's weight does obviously play a part there as it's sprung weight (minus the wheels etc) but when talking about getting correct spring rates, it's the rider's weight that matters.

I know what your saying about spring rate/rider weight, correct; but the Wr is under-sprung in stock form. Its

fine for the average trail rider but for aggressive riding or racing the bike rides to low in the stroke and needs heavier springs 1st, then valving adjustments "if needed". StandardFish450 wants a cost effective fix for his

suspension issue's and the heavier springs will give him that as well provide a base for any valving tweaks he

might want to do down the road.

Just searching the forums here again.  I have a 2012 WR450F and am considering having Pro-Action rebuild/revalve my suspension.  Its approx $500 to do.  I weigh about 230lbs, and ride single track and other trails...  no MX or racing.  I feel like my bike handles OK, but I have never ridden a bike that is "set up" for me personally.  I have been told by several that dialing up a suspension is crucial to getting the most out of a bike.   I love riding, but I am a mechanical idiot, meaning I cannot do this work myself.  Anyone here have this done and is it WORTH money spent?  Certainly its all personal preference, but any advice would be helpful.  Thanks All!

Yes, and it is absolutely worth every penny. At your weight, you are blowing through the initial part of the stroke just sitting on the bike, losing that plushness and if you push it at all you'll be wallowing all over the plade.

Do it, best money you can spend on your bike for sure. You've never had a bike set up for you, you'll be blown away by the difference.

If you take riding seriously, it's really not an option. 

You have no idea what your bike can do until you set it up for your weight and skill level.

 

It's pretty much like the difference between junk tires and good tires.

Thanks for the information!  I am going to call and have this done to the bike before we can ride again here up north!!

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