HEADS UP!!!

Site upgrade in progress... Core site functions are working, but some non-critical features/functions will be temporarily unavailable while we work to restore them over the next couple of weeks.

Please post any bugs you encounter, but before you do, check to see if it's already listed.

Thanks for your patience while we work to improve the community.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
MidlifeCrisisGuy

My WR450F tight woods "racer" build.

169 posts in this topic

Last summer (2013), after not riding since the late 1980s, I bought a 2012 WR450F to ride tight woods with my friend, an ex racer. 

 

Its been an incredible journey.  In the beginning I struggled on even the simplest trails.  I now competently handle intermediate and advanced trails and I'm improving with every ride. 

 

Part of my struggles were due to my bike selection.   The WR450F, as shipped from the factory, is NOT an ideal tight woods mount.  However, with some modifications it can be a very competitive mount.  I now find myself keeping up with conservative 300cc 2 stroke riders on tight trails, without expending any more energy than they are.  Part of this is due to vastly improved riding skills, but a great part of it is due to bike setup.

 

I bought a WR450F because 1) its not a motocross bike, 2) its very reliable 3) it has good suspension and 4) it has an outstanding engine.  Its also pretty inexpensive, especially if you find a good used one. 

 

I didn't buy a WR250F because in the long run it wouldn't have had enough power for me.

 

I think it was pure genius that Yamaha stuffed the 450 engine into the YZ250F chassis.  The WR450F has all the right parts to be an outstanding tight woods bike.  I'm not an expert or anything, but, here is what I have done (so far) to bring it up to its full potential. 

 

1) Weight

 

The fuel injected WR450F weighs 260 pounds without fuel from the factory.   This is way too heavy to be a good tight woods mount.  I removed about 22 pounds from my bike as described in my weight loss thread.   As far as I am concerned, the difference is night and day.

 

People argue for keeping the electric start.  I don't get it.  The EFI WR450F rarely stalls, especially once you get good at clutch modulation.  And when it does stall it fires back up quickly and easily.

 

The thing about the weight loss is that its pretty inexpensive and its easy to do.  And you can always add stuff back on the bike if you want to.

 

Two of the weight loss items have performance implications.  1) Exhaust.   2) Starter gear removal.   The latter lets the engine spin faster and gives it a more responsive, revvy feel.  It also reducing the spinning mass, making the bike feel lighter.  This makes riding tight woods much faster and more fun.

 

2) Gearing

 

A stock WR450F is geared way too high for true tight woods riding.  My bike is presently geared 12/51, which I find to be pretty good.  I do find I am revved out in 1st quite a bit lately.  I might drop to 12/54 to make second more usable. 

 

Gearing down obviously limits top end speed.  Where I ride and who I ride with makes this a non issue.  Its still way faster than the motocross based bikes.

 

3) Cooling

 

Stock WR450Fs run pretty hot when idling or slipping the clutch or in slow high load conditions, ie mud or climbing a lot.  They also run hot when lugging.

 

My WR450F was prone to boiling over last summer.  I replaced the 1.1 bar rad cap with a 2.1 bar rad cap and haven't had any further problems.   If I have further issues, I'll add an electric fan.

 

4) Tires

 

The stock MX51s leave a LOT to be desired in the woods.  I'm currently running an 140 IRC M5B in the back and an IRC "Vulcan Enduro" VE350F in the front.  I am not running a Tubliss.   I am running stock tubes.  I'm sure there are stickier tires, but the IRCs are reasonably priced, wear reasonably well and work in a variety of conditions. 

 

Having said all that, I was surprised at how much of the knobs were wore off my M5Bs after riding in hard rock for a few rides.

 

5) Clutch

 

The stock cable clutch pulls hard and is pretty vague. 

 

I replaced mine with a Magura hydraulic unit, with the small 9.5mm master piston.   It works great.  Clutch force is reduced and its much more precise.

 

Some people like Rekluse clutches.  I'm on the fence.  Once you develop good clutch modulation skills and learn to pull it in when you should, I question the need for a Rekluse.  I  especially like how much control I have of engine braking , etc with a manual clutch over a Rekluse. 

 

Aside: when I bought my WR450F, having never owned a 4 stroke, I was expecting never ending stump pulling torque that never stalled.   The truth is that modern 4 strokes flame out more frequently and easily than the 2 strokes.   This makes clutch management much more critical on a 4 stroke.

 

One big help in the flame out department is gearing.  The faster the engine is turning the less its going to stall.

 

It takes a bit of skill, but once you get on to proper clutch work on a 4 stroke, stalling becomes a virtual rarity. 

 

6) Suspension and geometry

 

The WR450F is a big bike and as such a lot of riders, like myself, are big.  I'm 6' 1" about 220 pounds.

 

The stock 2012+ WR450F is probably sprung for a 180 pound rider.  Soft suspension has 2 implications.  

 

1) riders tend to turn up the damping in the fork to counter bottoming.  This creates a harsh ride over rocks and roots.  

 

2) When you put your weight back (sitting or climbing) the rear suspension compresses too far and it throws the steering geometry out, creating what I like to call the "chopper effect".  The result is very vague and imprecise steering and the inability of the bike to follow rider input without constant, tiring, over correction.  In woods riding, where the only good line may be 4 inches wide, this is a death knell.

 

If your 450F isn't steering well, try cranking up the preload on the rear shock.  The difference was night and day on mine.

 

My bike is presently running a Racetech 6.0 Kg/mm in the back and 0.50 Kg/mm in the front with about 310 ccs of oil in the forks.  This setup is not perfect, but it is livable and as good or better than most stock tight woods bikes.

 

My rear suspension is still too stiff over sharp bumps like roots, small drops and rocks.   The front suspension is a bit too soft, though it is very compliant, especially over log crossings.  The front end also feels pretty planted, though this is probably due as much too having the rear suspension set up properly as the front settings.

 

For the record, I have 21mm of static sag and 52 to to 58 mm of race sag in the forks.  I have 12.5 mm of static sag and 98.5 mm of race sag in the shock.  I realize I could decrease the preload in the rear a bit, but I love the precise steering that the current setup yields.  I may drop the rear and raise the fork tubes in the triple clamps in the future.

 

The fork sag numbers tend to indicate the front is oversprung, and yet I say its soft.   The problem is bottoming resistance.  Racetech recommends 350ccs of oil for my setup to increase progression.   I'll be adding oil to my forks in the future.  If that doesn't give me enough, I'll update to 0.52 Kg/mm fork springs.  FYI, the difference between 0.5 and 0.52 Kg for springs at half travel (150mm) is 6Kg or 13.2 pounds of force.

 

As far as clicker settings go, I'm running +1 on rebound front and rear, -2 on compression on the fork and I've backed high and low speed compression off dramatically on the rear.

 

Aside: I purchased my bike used from a guy my size.  I checked the rear sag last summer and found it to be in the range of acceptable and thus rode it like that.  What I didn't check was how much preload the shock spring had.  When I removed the stock spring, I found it had about 40mm of preload !  Max allowable is 18mm.  The spring had collapsed, which probably contributed to my handling/steering problems.   FWIW, the Racetech spring is physically a much larger spring in diameter and overall length compared to the stock Yamaha spring.

 

One more thing about suspension: it makes a huge difference in woods riding.  A day in the woods is no fun on a bike that bounces off every rock, log and root.  A properly suspended woods bike is way, way faster than one that isn't, probably more so in the woods than on a motocross track.  If there is one thing that will dramatically improve your enjoyment, its suspension. 

 

The suspension on my bike is a work in progress.  I'll update this thread as I discover more.  I suspect the shock is going to need a Gold valve at some point.

 

7) Miscellaneous stuff

 

The stock seat on these bikes sucks as far as comfort goes.  I'll be going with a tall, soft seat at some point.

 

I'm running the stock CO and competition ECM map.  I'll be updating these as well.   Don't even bother trying to ride a WR450F without the competition ECM.

 

I (6'1", in socks) find the stock WR450F ergonomics to be quite cramped.  I reversed the foot peg mounts to drop the pegs about 3/4".  That made the transition from sitting to standing a little less like doing squats.  A taller seat would help too.  I moved my bars to the full forward position by reversing the bar mounts.  I wish these bikes had the top triple clamp from a YZ250F which has 2 holes in which to mount the bar mounts.

 

I cut my bars down to ~30 inches and added bush bars.   They have rubbed many trees and saved many crashes !

 

I softened the rear brake response by introducing a bit of air into the master cylinder.  Thanks for the tip, Krannie !   It works great.  Prior to that the rear brake was too binary, ie on or off, especially on steep downhills.   Now its much easier to drag it without skidding the rear wheel.   I find the stock front brake to be very good, though sometimes I'd like a bit more braking power.

 

My bike runs way better on 94 octane fuel versus 91 octane.  Its harder to stall and it has better throttle response.  YMMV.

 

I've always liked my WR450F, but now I am beginning to really love it.  The more I refine it the better it works.  I absolutely love the engine.  Power everywhere, totally controllable.  I also love that the entire bike is 100% reliable.

 

I hope this helps someone trying to use a WR450F in tight woods.

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

310 cc of oil is nowhere near enough. You have bottoming resistance issues - that's why. RT was pretty close at 350; I run 345 for my set up and at 12 clicks out just barely bottom on a flat landing or hitting a whoop hard. I'm 205 lb no gear and run the stock YZ .47 springs. Tried my RT .50s first, but they were too much in these forks (worked great in the stock open bath '11 forks). I tried 355 first and found it to be overly harsh then went to 340, then added 5. Now it's just like baby bear likes it - just right.

You should definitely try a baseline of about 350, back off those clickers a little and see what you think.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tip.   I'm hoping more oil makes a difference.

 

Question: is there a way to adjust oil levels without taking the forks out of the TC ?  What tool(s) are you using to adjust the level ? 

 

Thanks !

 

Edit: your 2011 WR uses different forks than my 2012.

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the 2011 did use the earlier style open bath forks, but I swapped over to a set of 2006 YZ450 SSS forks on this bike. So aside from a few valving differences, we pretty much have the same forks.

To adjust oil levels, you have to remove the forks from the bike. To get into the forks, you need a fork cap wrench, and it's easiest to loosen the top triple clamp (so only the lower is tight), loosen the fork cap a couple of turns, and then loosen the lower clamp and remove the fork. Unfortunately, you can't just pop open the vent screw and add oil - it'll just spill around the top because it's such a tiny orifice and you'll never be accurate. RMATV sells a cap wrench/compression valve removal tool combo for $20.

Also, it's easy to lose track of how much oil you've put in, so stay on top of the records. As you've probably read, even a 5 cc change does make a noticeable difference with these forks. The best way to do it is empty out what you've got and start fresh, but if you're sure you've got 310 a side, maybe add 35 or 40 each and go from there. I always try to be as accurate as possible with these oil volumes, but if it's off only a little, you'll get the effect of whatever the average is between left and right and it shouldn't feel weird.

Also, it's more of a pain to remove oil with this type of fork (with one of those syringe extended tube things), but it is possible - but don't read the syringe, because the volume of the tube will make it inaccurate. I'd just dump out the outer chamber and start over. And even then, I'd really rather take the forks apart to clean/blow out all the old oil and know exactly how much is in there.

There are some good YouTube videos out there on this, too (which I would link, but I'm on my phone).

Edit: I remembered the videos I was thinking of - search TBT Racing.

Edited by RockerWR450

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't there a syringe/needle type set up that allows you to add or remove oil from the forks n still measure it for height on the wr's!

Should've been a question mark, my bad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 335 in my '06 YZ SSS forks

It's a bit low, but the traction is better for single track.

I started with 375. Holy crap was that annoying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the 2011 did use the earlier style open bath forks, but I swapped over to a set of 2006 YZ450 SSS forks on this bike. So aside from a few valving differences, we pretty much have the same forks.

To adjust oil levels, you have to remove the forks from the bike. To get into the forks, you need a fork cap wrench, and it's easiest to loosen the top triple clamp (so only the lower is tight), loosen the fork cap a couple of turns, and then loosen the lower clamp and remove the fork. Unfortunately, you can't just pop open the vent screw and add oil - it'll just spill around the top because it's such a tiny orifice and you'll never be accurate. RMATV sells a cap wrench/compression valve removal tool combo for $20.

Also, it's easy to lose track of how much oil you've put in, so stay on top of the records. As you've probably read, even a 5 cc change does make a noticeable difference with these forks. The best way to do it is empty out what you've got and start fresh, but if you're sure you've got 310 a side, maybe add 35 or 40 each and go from there. I always try to be as accurate as possible with these oil volumes, but if it's off only a little, you'll get the effect of whatever the average is between left and right and it shouldn't feel weird.

Also, it's more of a pain to remove oil with this type of fork (with one of those syringe extended tube things), but it is possible - but don't read the syringe, because the volume of the tube will make it inaccurate. I'd just dump out the outer chamber and start over. And even then, I'd really rather take the forks apart to clean/blow out all the old oil and know exactly how much is in there.

There are some good YouTube videos out there on this, too (which I would link, but I'm on my phone).

Edit: I remembered the videos I was thinking of - search TBT Racing.

 

Thanks for the clarification on your forks and clearing up adding fork oil to these things.

 

FWIW, I did the spring swap in my forks, so I know the procedure for taking them apart.  I was hoping there was some trick that allowed the cap to be removed enough to add oil without taking the forks off. <-- big pain !

 

I'm a machinist.  Any reason why I couldn't drill the fork caps and add a fill port ?  Say 1/8" NPT ?  If 5ccs makes a big difference, its going to take a bit of trial and error to get the oil level right.   Or what if one drilled out the bleed port larger ?

 

The caps *almost* come up enough above the fork to allow the addition of oil.  If one cut a slot or drilled a hole in the cap below the threads and O Ring, one could add oil without taking the forks off.   Surely factory team suspension mechanics don't remove the forks every time they need to make an oil level change ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I don't have exact measurements, but off memory I would guess the compression valve assembly and the widest (uppermost) part of the inner chamber that the compression valve lives in takes up about the top 8" in the fork tube.  There's really no way you're going to drill there.  From there, the body of the inner chamber, which is only slightly narrower runs down about the next 16" of the fork tube before it gets down to the damper rod itself, which is surrounded by the spring when everything is put together.  Since you're obviously not going to drill through the chrome inner tube portion, you'd have to drill and tap a hole some place out of the way of the spring seat, as high as possible, and then machine a cap that both seals high pressures and doesn't protrude inside more than a couple of mm, mainly because of the inner tube that will get severely damaged as it attempts to shear off whatever's in its way when the fork does its thing.

 

Otherwise, I guess you could weld a little appendage on the outside of the fork tube to make a little fill port, but that would just be crazy.  Personally, I think it's just worth the trial and error pain - which is probably what the factory teams do (when they aren't just adding or letting out a little air these days) - yeah you may have to drop the forks a couple of times, but once you find the volume you like, it's really set it and forget it for the 99.9% of us regular dudes.  And that volume really shouldn't change unless you gain or lose a bunch of weight (like maybe 22 lbs off the bike or something).  Daily variables are handled by the clickers.

 

I bet with your 225 lb (I think) body weight and 22 lb lighter bike weight, and not getting too mired in sprung vs. unsprung weight, our weights are fairly similar.  Try starting with 340 cc of 5 (or even 7) weight oil, put your clickers to their middle settings and tune from there.  You should notice a huge difference coming up from 310, since now you can take a bunch of compression out and let these forks work like KYB intended.

 

And with all of this - a disclaimer - I'm no expert like some of the guys here.  I'm just some guy who's taken my forks apart a whole bunch of times in the past several months and has tried a bunch of different oil/spring combinations and clicker settings.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you elaborate on this statement please? I cannot figure out what  you mean. Thanks!

 

"I replaced the 1.1 bar rad cap with a 2.1 bar rad cap and haven't had any further problems. ".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you elaborate on this statement please? I cannot figure out what  you mean. Thanks!

 

"I replaced the 1.1 bar rad cap with a 2.1 bar rad cap and haven't had any further problems. ".

 

WR450Fs come with a 15 PSI (1.1 bar) radiator cap.  I replaced mine with a 30 PSI (2.1 bar) radiator cap.  It raises the boiling point of the coolant significantly, preventing boil overs and increasing the system cooling capacity.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I adjusted the idle mixture on my bike using the FI tool this week. I changed the "C1" variable from a 0 to 8.  I did not have access to an exhaust gas analyzer, so 8 was a guess on my part.

 

Richening the idle mixture had a big impact on low RPM and off idle engine performance and stalling.   Whereas my WR450F was somewhat prone to stalling before, now it runs really strong down low.  Its now possible to completely shut off the throttle on a steep climb and crack it open again without worrying about a flameout.  This saved my butt on several very technical climbs this weekend.  This one change really improves the bike's performance on hill climbs and in technical terrain.  You really have to work at stalling it now.

 

I'm not sure if richening the idle made it run cooler or not as I have no overheating problems since I installed the 2.1 bar rad cap.  I did manage to get it to steam very briefly at the top of a huge, long, technical hill climb.  I attribute this to using a very large amount of clutch slipping to make it to the top.

 

As far as kick starting goes, I'm not sure it made a difference.  And it might have made it worse.  Last season my bike started on the first kick every time.   This season its starts on the first kick only 50% of the time.  I'm still trying to figure out why.

 

FYI, it was easy to program the idle mixture with the FI tool in spite of my bike having no battery.  I temporarily wired a battery to the bike and then programmed it just as you would on a stock bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caveat: I'm not an expert.  I've been riding for less than a year.  I'm not fast or smooth.  I'm sharing my experience in case there are others wanting to use a WR450 in the woods.

 

I went on a 25 mile tight, technical woods ride yesterday with 4 intermediate/expert racers and 1 novice racer.  The bike list was 1 TE300, 1 Gas Gas 300, 2 250/300 KTMs and 1 Yamaha 125 woods racer special punched out to 167cc.  I was the only one riding a 4 stroke.  Half the bikes had revalved suspensions.   The intermediate riders were using the ride to work on their race speed.

 

The trail started out extremely tight.  The 125 rider said it best, "there is no room to make a mistake on these trails". Thankfully it was dry except for mossy sections down in the valleys and creek crossings.  I only got into 3rd gear a few times in the open areas between the tight areas the entire ride.  The second half of the ride opened up a bit into more flowing trail, but it was still rare to have a sight line of more than 25 yards before the next mostly blind turn.

 

The entire group was faster than me, not surprising given my experience and I'm still sorting out my bike.  What surprised me was that I was able to keep up at all and that I seemed to be as fresh or maybe fresher than the other riders.  From this I'm deducing that my WR450F isn't too far behind this group of bikes in performance. 

 

I passed the novice rider on a KTM 250 a few times.   He was having a lot of trouble on hills, especially if he needed to restart, which happened several times.  He was leaving me behind in the flat easy woods, but I was riding pretty conservatively and he crashed several times.  He was absolutely wiped at the rest stops.  He retired after 15 miles. 

 

My WR absolutely shone on the hills.   The ride went up the side of several mountains and then back into the valleys.  Up, down, up down, all afternoon long.   None of the climbs were open or straight.  You'd climb up 20 yards, make an S turn, climb another 20 yards, another turn around a tree, up more, etc.   With the improved low end due to richening the idle mixture, my WR was absolutely owning these climbs.   I'd drop to first to make the turn, which was often treacherous and then nail it for the climb part, shifting to second about 50% of the time.  Then coast into the the next S turn, drop a gear and repeat.

 

The one climb series was huge.  We must have went up 300 feet.  It got steeper as you went, but it was never so steep I was worried about looping.   I actually stalled due to inattention about 3 yards from the top and was able to easily restart and clutch slip.   The novice rider stalled and had a hard time.  Several of the other riders said they struggled, especially the 125 rider.  For the most part I cruised up, even though I have way less experience in these conditions than the others.   I even managed to pass the GasGas rider twice on hillclimbs.

 

The suspension on my bike still needs some work.  I finally got the back end tuned to the point where it isn't jarring me over the rocks and roots, but its still not as plush as the other bikes and anything over about 3 feet of air will totally bottom it.   My front fork rides too low and dives a bit too much.  I'd like it to stay much higher in the stroke.  Other than that, the front seems pretty good.  My quest for better suspension continues. 

 

My WR engine is just so damn nice in these conditions.  Power everywhere, totally controllable.  And I'm still running the stock map.  If I could ask for anything, it would be a bit less engine braking and a bit more 2 stroke like explosiveness.   To this end, I might investigate putting YZ cams in it. 

 

The end of the day was interesting.  I certainly wasn't any more tired than anyone in the group and I was certainly way less tired than 2 or 3 of the riders.   The 125 rider was completely spent.  Based on this, I have to say that my WR is becoming a very worthy tight woods mount. 

 

However my WR compares to the other bikes, I had an absolute blast on the ride.  I was never scared or not confident in how my WR was handling the terrain.  I suffered no major dismounts.  The bike ran perfectly the entire time and was easy to control for the most part.  I can't wait for the next ride.

 

I hope this helps someone thinking of using a WR450F for woods riding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I liked my WR in the tight stuff as well.....until I rode my new KTM 350 EXC.  After 3 days I was ready for 3 more.  A mtn bike with a motor :ride:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't put in YZ cams, unless you like your power in the mid and up mostly.

 

Get your spring sized for you

 

I'm glad you replied, Krannie.   What year are your cams ?   How did they affect your low RPM power ?

 

From what I've been reading, the 2011+ WR cams have reduced lift compared to the YZ cams.   Prior to that all the cams (WR and YZ) had the same lift. 

 

There are other various trade offs, but the gist is that 2008 and 2009 cams should give a nice power boost just about everywhere, without much impact on the low end.

 

My springs are pretty much right on.

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't there a syringe/needle type set up that allows you to add or remove oil from the forks n still measure it for height on the wr's!

Should've been a question mark, my bad

Motion pro makes them. But they are super simple to make yourself without paying $30.

I used a syringe, fuel line and a wire coat hanger attached to the fuel line to keep it straight. Then measure the height from the top of the fork tube to where you want your oil level, put a marking on the fuel line so you know how far to put it into the fork tube and suck out excess oil. Works great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad you replied, Krannie.   What year are your cams ?   How did they affect your low RPM power ?

 

From what I've been reading, the 2011+ WR cams have reduced lift compared to the YZ cams.   Prior to that all the cams (WR and YZ) had the same lift. 

 

There are other various trade offs, but the gist is that 2008 and 2009 cams should give a nice power boost just about everywhere, without much impact on the low end.

 

My springs are pretty much right on.

 

Well, I have the hotcams set which is supposedly the same as 2006  YZ450F.

Power below 5k is slightly less, and from 6k -9k it is massively stronger (oh, and my head is stage 3 ported now as well, which makes the power delivery a bit wider and stronger)

On the street it's a gas.

In the dirt, on uphills, you can feel the low rpm power loss, and requires just a bit more shifting.

 

I would have like to have tried the stock YZ exahaust cam first

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I have the hotcams set which is supposedly the same as 2006 YZ450F.

Power below 5k is slightly less, and from 6k -9k it is massively stronger (oh, and my head is stage 3 ported now as well, which makes the power delivery a bit wider and stronger)

On the street it's a gas.

In the dirt, on uphills, you can feel the low rpm power loss, and requires just a bit more shifting.

I would have like to have tried the stock YZ exahaust cam first

Hey Bill, what's the difference between the stock YZ cam and the Hotcam we have in our WR's? It was my understanding that is what we have, the stock YZ cam for our model year bike with a decomp pin adjusted to allow for the e-start to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad you replied, Krannie.   What year are your cams ?   How did they affect your low RPM power ?

 

From what I've been reading, the 2011+ WR cams have reduced lift compared to the YZ cams.   Prior to that all the cams (WR and YZ) had the same lift. 

 

There are other various trade offs, but the gist is that 2008 and 2009 cams should give a nice power boost just about everywhere, without much impact on the low end.

 

My springs are pretty much right on.

 

So you find the power of your WR to be inadequate and you need more? Really? Have you changed your FI mapping at all? You can make your WR feel very much like a YZ with simple FI change, if that's what you're after.

 

But be careful what you wish for. You're going down the same path Dirt Bike (or was it Dirt Rider?) did with their new/old WR comparo... they put Hot Cams etc in the new WR just because that *was* the hot ticket on older WRs. And then they complained that is was too moto, too much hit, bottom end was too abrupt, yadda yadda. They went out of their way to make the bike into exactly what they didn't like about it. More power isn't going to make you any faster on that bike, guaranteed. If anything, it will just slow you down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0