Reversing the Carnage

If you can stand that is great, but it's hard to adjust weight distribution once you are stood up, for me anyway..,...6'4".........

I put your advice to work on my last couple climbs, Krannie and I'm killing the hills now !

 

I'm 6'1" in socks and you are right that sitting often works better.   My CG is way too high when I am standing.   Seems that sitting way forward lets the back of the bike move around a lot without throwing me off.  There are probably hills I'll still need to stand on, but wow, what a difference sitting way forward, at least during the last half of a tough climb anyway.

 

Thanks for the tip.

I put your advice to work on my last couple climbs, Krannie and I'm killing the hills now !

 

I'm 6'1" in socks and you are right that sitting often works better.   My CG is way too high when I am standing.   Seems that sitting way forward lets the back of the bike move around a lot without throwing me off.  There are probably hills I'll still need to stand on, but wow, what a difference sitting way forward, at least during the last half of a tough climb anyway.

 

Thanks for the tip.

 

 

No sweat.

 

Ready for the next one?

 

Try 'skiing' on the foot pegs.

 

Instead of putting weight on the seat all the time, push down, hard, on the outside peg when cornering. (Outside meaning, weight on right peg when going left)

Always be transfering weight to the peg that is on the outside of the corner. When you do this, use more throttle, and let the bike drift in the rear. 

If you use enough weight, and keep your outside elbow up and stiff, you will be able to use as much throttle as you want, without losing the rear end. 

It will allow you to stop shutting off in places where forward motion provides more control, and use full throttle in places where you just thought you couldn't.....

No sweat.

 

Ready for the next one?

 

Try 'skiing' on the foot pegs.

 

Instead of putting weight on the seat all the time, push down, hard, on the outside peg when cornering. (Outside meaning, weight on right peg when going left)

Always be transfering weight to the peg that is on the outside of the corner. When you do this, use more throttle, and let the bike drift in the rear. 

If you use enough weight, and keep your outside elbow up and stiff, you will be able to use as much throttle as you want, without losing the rear end. 

It will allow you to stop shutting off in places where forward motion provides more control, and use full throttle in places where you just thought you couldn't.....

 

That is a very cool tip.   I'll practice it on my next ride.

 

Another thing I need to practice is shifting my weight side to side without leaning the bike.

 

My riding buddies say I am paddling too much, ie putting a foot down.   I tend to do it when traction is dicy and when the terrain is really tight, like when you need to slow down to a crawl to wiggle the bars between two trees.  Any tips on breaking this bad habit ?

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy

Ignore double post.

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy

That is a very cool tip.   I'll practice it on my next ride.

 

Another thing I need to practice is shifting my weight side to side without leaning the bike.

 

My riding buddies say I am paddling too much, ie putting a foot down.   I tend to do it when traction is dicy and when the terrain is really tight, like when you need to slow down to a crawl to wiggle the bars between two trees.  Any tips on breaking this bad habit ?

 

Balance, like on a surfboard

Not paddle, like on a boat.

Just ride more. 

I mean every chance you get, any where, on anything.

 

 

You should be able to shift your weight substantially without using the bars, in a fraction of a second.

It's easiset to do if you practice it locally, on any simple object: curb, mound, anything. You want to control the bikes traction and center without removing your feet at all costs.

I used to practice going in a circle and/or figure-8 out on my street, with a curb being part of the loop, at full lock most of the time. 

Teaches clutch and balance control quickly.

It's good to practice balance and control on pavement, as you have a much more predictable and consistent surface.

Then you transfer it to dirt.

 

I'm just telling you what works for me, and what I have been taught

 

Most ' riding basics' videos talk about trying to stand as much as possible, but that really isn;'t possible on very steep very long or loose hills. Especially if you are very tall like me.

Bill is tall and a freak of nature :smirk:

Reminds me of years ago when Randy Johnson, the baseball pitcher, was setting up a quad for himself to ride. He is like 6'11 :yikes:

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