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Jmill14

Which Reusable Air Filter

24 posts in this topic

He everyone.  I've replaced my air filter a few times now and am already tired on that cost.  I'd love to get two cleanable filters but with all the choices / price points I have no idea which one to get.  Can anyone point me in the right direction?  Which oil are you using to lube the filter?  2010 yzf450.....

 

thanks

jason

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The one that came in the bike was reusable.  But never mind.  I prefer TwinAir or Uni's.  Maxima FFT worked in thoroughly, squeezed out, and dried for a day.

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"The one that came in the bike was reusable. But never mind" lol

 

i like uni or twin filter also. but i like the uni arisol oil. easier to clean

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In spite of what anyone says, there's nothing easier than cleaning FFT out of a filter.  That is, nothing that works for filtering dirt, and if you do it right. 

 

Get a plastic bucket with a lid, put two gallons of Mineral Spirits in it, and don't use it for anything but filters.  Wash them by hand right in the bucket (wearing gloves), wring them out and hang them up to dry overnight.  Then thoroughly reoil them, work it all the way through the foam, and let that "cure" overnight again.  Install one and bag the other(s).  Easy.

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I use Twin air filters and belray foam filter oil.

I also use mineral spirits but also use soapy water and clean rinse water after that. Then let dry completely, work the oil in real well, sit to 'cure' over night, install or bag.

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I use Twin air filters and belray foam filter oil.

I also use mineral spirits but also use soapy water and clean rinse water after that. Then let dry completely, work the oil in real well, sit to 'cure' over night, install or bag.

This is exactly my method. I use Twin Air Filters and Belray.  The mineral spirits works good to get the old oil off, then the bucket of soapy water gets out any remaining dirt.

I have three filters I rotate use,install clean one every ride.  I think with the method described you need to have multiple filters or it just becomes too time consuming as it is a couple day process.

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Sorry too jump in but do you have too let them dry that long I just switched from no toil and tried bel ray. And probly went riding about a hour after I oiled it.

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In spite of what anyone says, there's nothing easier than cleaning FFT out of a filter.

 

Except No-Toil :)

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I really appreciate all the input. I've got the original and another so I should be good. Just need the oil and spirits. Thanks everyone.

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Sorry too jump in but do you have too let them dry that long I just switched from no toil and tried bel ray. And probly went riding about a hour after I oiled it.

I believe it is better to let sit and tack up but I would think your bike is fine. I think no toil sucks.

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I have used No-Toil for 10 years and never had an issue. I know that people will always prefer one thing or another when it comes to their bikes, and I am certainly not except to that rule. But... How and why has No-Toil ever done you wrong? I use it in the sandiest of conditions and have never had dirt or sand pass through, cleanup is as easy as it gets and it's much less toxic than standard oil/cleaning solutions. 

Not trying to start a war here, just curious what it is that people hate about it.

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... How and why has No-Toil ever done you wrong?

 

I tried it a few years back and was very disappointed with it.  For one thing, it's more work than my method.  I can clean the filter in under a minute in mineral spirits and be done with it except for hanging it out to dry.  No mess in the sink, nothing to discard except once every 8 or nine months I change the solvent and scrape the dirt off the bottom of the bucket.  The other thing, and I'm told that they've improved it some, is that the oil doesn't retain its tackiness like FFT.  I can leave an FFT oiled filter out for a month and it's still like fly paper.  No Toil "dries out".  This matters to me because the bike sometimes sits prepped for a race or ride for a couple of weeks, and also because I do 3 filters at a time and bag them for later use. 

 

 

The mineral spirits works good to get the old oil off, then the bucket of soapy water gets out any remaining dirt.

 

I don't bother with that.  At the risk of sounding like a lunatic, I don't care if the filter is 100% totally clean.  The fact is that any dirt that's in the filter foam when I oil it is going to stay there until I wash it again. (if I oil it right)

 

Sorry too jump in but do you have too let them dry that long I just switched from no toil and tried bel ray. And probly went riding about a hour after I oiled it.

Filter oils, especially spray types, have light "vehicle solvents" that carry the thicker filter oil in a thin form so it can flow into and over the foam webbing.  If you don't let that have enough time to evaporate, you can end up sucking some filter oil out of the foam and get it into parts of your carb.  Or, it might drool over the inside of your air box and onto your swing arm.

 

In any case, remember that it's the oil and not the foam that catches the dirt.  Oil your filters thoroughly, all the way through.

 

Just use some old gas cleans em like a champ

That's a really great way to poison yourself, or blow your whole garage off the lot.

Bad idea.

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I believe, through experience, that red no toil system with powder cleaner destroys the glue on the filters. That is the part i don't like. It did clean up very easy but holes in the filter make it useless to me.

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The glue on the filters takes a beating anyway, and I just had my two three or four-year-old TwinAirs fall apart as a result of being cleaned and oiled so often (I ride the SoCal deserts, and nearly always with a bunch of other guys around, so the dust mandates that I clean the filter after every ride day or race.  That's a lot of wringing and squeezing).  If yours came unglued sooner that, I guess you could blame the cleaner, but I don't know about that part.

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I mentioned my experience to more experienced friends of mine and they had the same thought. There is no scientific evidence or anything, I just rather try something else. The glue deteriorated on 2 of mine. One old that the previous owner gave me and one new one that I bought.

I use the soapy water and rinse water too because I was concerned about just mineral spirits sitting in the filter too long damaging the glue too.

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I change my filters after every ride. I have no choice due to the conditions. I keep 5 or 6 filters and have a dirty and clean bin, washing them all at the same time. While the filters do end up falling apart eventually, it does so at a pretty slow rate, lasting years at a time.

 

What works for some may not work for others I suppose. I have just never had a problem and clean up has been so easy for me that I couldn't see trying another option. 

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I use the soapy water and rinse water too because I was concerned about just mineral spirits sitting in the filter too long damaging the glue too.

 

I don't worry about that, given that the filter was designed to "smell gasoline" and be smothered in mineral oil its whole life.

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the reason i like the uni arisol oil is because i can clean it with some warm water and dish soap. but i do have to reoil if it sits too long. but thats rarely an issue for me since  if i'm not going riding the next day i'm not cleaning and getting my bike ready

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    • By Red_250X
      Just wanted to give you X fans some real world successful jetting settings. I just got back from a trip to Colorado and wanted to share these settings.
      Our camp was at 6100' and we rode up to 13,000'. Temperature was between 65 and 85 (absolutely PERFECT!).
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      Airbox opened about a third of CCC recommendations.
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      Pilot jet changed from 40 to 42.
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    • By 230F
      Jetting the 230F
      By: Phil Vieira
      This project takes no less than 2 hours if you have never done jetting to a bike before. It took me 1.5 hours, to take my bike apart, take out the needle, change my pilot jet and the main, and take pictures along the way, but I have seen the inside of my carb 3 times, so I know my way around it pretty well…
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      Riding elevation: 2000ft - Sea level
      Temperature – Around 60-90 degrees
      Spark Plug Tips
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      Determining the plug color, you will have to mess with the fuel screw.
      That’s it, have fun jetting, and any questions, post on the forum, but remember to do a search first.
      Also, if your bike requires different jets due to alititude, humidity, or temperature, please post the following so we can better assist you:
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      What jets you are currently running
      What the problem is (If there is one)
      Just do that and we'll help you out the best we can.
      EDIT: The girl using this login name is my girlfriend. You can reach me on my new login name at 250Thumpher
      Then again, you're more than welcome to say hi to her!
      -Phill Vieira
    • By Eddie Sisneros
      seems like the most common jetting issue that comes up are pilot circuit related.the following is a sure method to choose the needed changes.
      with the bike warm and idleing turn the fuel screw in till the idle drops/misses.then go back out till the idle peaks/smooths.
      this should happen between 1 and 2.5 turns on a fcr carb and 1 and 3 turns on a cv.
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      choose the appropriate size and retest.
      This post has been promoted to a wiki
    • By Motocross26
      Is there drool "spooge" running down your silencer at the end of a ride? Does your bike smoke at operating temperature? Do you foul plugs on a regular basis? Is your throttle-response poor and boggy?
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      "Here are a few words and some pictures I put together to help eliminate the confusion in setting your float level. Obtaining the correct float level is of the utmost importance as it can affect all jetting circuits. THE FLOAT LEVEL IS THE FIRST STEP TO PROPERLY DIALING IN YOUR JETTING. It should be checked and/or set before you even think about swapping brass. By altering the volume of fuel in the float bowl you can vary your fuel pressure and affect your jetting. More fuel in the float bowl will create more fuel pressure and result in rich(er) running conditions and vice versa.
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      (Float assembly pivot pin not shown.)
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      (Fuel inlet needle shown with Viton (rubber) tip. The Viton is used to isolate the fuel inlet needle from vibration and to create a better seal against the fuel inlet valve seat.)
      Now that you’ve made sure you aren’t going to have any issues from worn parts you can reinstall your needle, float assembly and float assembly pivot pin and continue on to set your float level. The float level measurement is taken from the top of the floats (when the carb is positioned upside down) to the gasket surface of the float bowl as illustrated in the next picture. You can use an open-end wrench (sized per your spec), a small metric ruler, or a float level gauge. The tolerance for your float level is usually around +/- 0.50mm.

      When setting the float level be aware that the spring loaded bumper on the fuel inlet needle valve may have a tendency to compress under the weight of the float assembly which will skew your measurement. Before you obtain your measurement you’ll need to make sure that the float assembly tang just barely makes contact with the spring-loaded bumper. Sometimes it is easier to hold the carb body at a 45-degree angle to avoid compressing the spring in the fuel inlet needle.

      If you find that your measurement does not match your float level spec then you can carefully bend the float assembly tang to achieve your desired measurement. Be sure to recheck your work, and if you feel confident that your float level is spot on then you can reinstall your carb and get back to riding."
      END OF ARTICLE
      Now that you know that you have the correct float height, you can start swapping out brass.
      Words of Assurance: Jetting isn't hard and comes with practice. You're not going to mess your bike up unless you make huge changes. You WILL be able to tell if your bike is running lean enough to be in danger of seizing. So, don't worry.
      Article by Spanky:
      "Throttle Ranges:
      Pilot Jet/air screw:0-1/4.
      Needle Jet:1/4-3/4
      Main Jet: 3/4-Full open
      A correctly jetted carb makes a tremendous difference in the torque, midrange pull, top-end pull, and over-rev of your engine. If you have never jetted your bike correctly, you will almost certainly gain some performance at some point in the bike's power band. A cleanly jetted pilot circuit can be the difference between having to clutch the bike out of a turn or not. The needle can make all the difference in the world for the power of the machine in most situations, as it controls the throttle range that most riders spend most of their time using. A correctly sized main jet could mean the difference between being able to rev out high enough to not have to shift one more time at the end of the straight, or the power falling flat on top and requiring you to make that extra shift.
      The only way to know what jetting changes you will need is by trial-and-error. No one can give you jetting specs, because every bike is different, every rider has a different style, and jetting is totally weather dependent.
      Jetting is fairly simple, and is a useful skill to learn if you ride a two-stroke and want it to perform at it's best.
      It's very important that you start with the pilot circuit. The reason is simple. The pilot circuit affects the entire throttle range. When you are at full throttle, the main jet is the primary fuel metering device, but the pilot is still delivering fuel as well, adding to the total amount of fuel that your engine is receiving.
      Before you start to rejet your bike, you need a clean air filter, a fresh plug (actually you need several plugs to do plug-chop tests for the main jet), and fresh fuel. One important detail: Make sure the engine is in good mechanical condition. If your engine has a worn top-end, fix it first. Trying to jet a worn out engine is a waste of time. The same goes for reeds that don't seal properly, and a silencer that needs re-packing.
      Before you start the jet testing, Install a fresh plug. Warm the bike completely, and shut it off.
      As already stated, start with the pilot circuit. Turn the air screw all the way in, then turn it out 1.5 turns to start. Start the engine, and turn the idle screw in until you get a slightly fast idle, or hold the throttle just barely cracked, to keep the engine idling. Turn the airscrew slowly in, and then out, until you find the point where the idle is fastest. Stop there. Do not open the screw any farther, or your throttle response will be flat and mushy, and the bike may even bog. This is only the starting point, we will still have to tune the air screw for the best response.
      Now is the time to determine if you have the correct pilot installed in your carb. The air screw position determines this for you, making it very simple. If your air screw is less than 1 turn from closed, you need a larger pilot jet. If it is more than 2.5 turns from closed, you need a smaller pilot jet.
      Once you have determined (and installed it if it's necessary to change it) the correct pilot jet size, and tuned the air screw for the fastest idle, it's time to tune the air screw for the best throttle response. Again, make sure the bike is at full operating temperature. Set the idle back down (the bike should still idle, despite what you read in the Moto Tabloids), and ride the bike, using closed-to-1/4 throttle transitions. Turn the air screw slightly in either direction until you find the point that gives you the best response when cracking the throttle open. Most bikes are sensitive to changes as small as 1/8 of a turn.
      The air screw is not a set-it-and-leave-it adjustment. You have to constantly re-adjust the air screw to compensate for changing outdoor temps and humidity. An air screw setting that is perfect in the cool morning air will likely be too rich in the heat of the mid-day.
      Now, it's time to work on the needle. Mark the throttle grip at 1/4 and 3/4 openings. Ride the bike between these two marks. If the bike bogs for a second before responding to throttle, lower the clip (raising the needle) a notch at a time until the engine picks up smoothly. If the bike sputters or sounds rough when giving it throttle, raise the clip (lowering the needle) until it runs cleanly. There isn't really any way to test the needle other than by feel, but it's usually quite obvious when it's right or wrong.
      Last is the main jet. The main jet affects from 1/2 to full throttle. The easiest way to test it is to do a throttle-chop test. With the bike fully warmed up, find a long straight, and install a fresh plug. Start the engine, and do a full-throttle run down the straight, through all gears. As soon as the bike tops out, pull the clutch in, and kill the engine, coasting to a stop. Remove the plug, and look deep down inside the threads, at the base of the insulator. If it is white or gray, the main is too lean. If it is dark brown or black, the main is too rich. The correct color is a medium-dark mocha brown or tan.
      Once you have a little bit of experience with jetting changes, and you start to learn the difference in feel between "rich" and "lean", you'll begin to learn, just from the sound of the exhaust and the feel of the power, not only if the bike is running rich or lean, but even which one of the carb circuits is the culprit.
      Keep in mind, even though this article is intended primarily for two-strokes, four-strokes also need proper jetting to perform right, although they are not quite as fussy as their oil-burning cousins. The only real difference in the two is with the pilot circuit. Two-strokes have an air screw that you screw in to make the jetting richer, and screw out to make the jetting leaner. Four-strokes, on the other hand, have a fuel adjustment screw that you screw in to make the jetting leaner, and out to make it richer."
      END OF ARTICLE
      NOTE:
      REMOVING (leaning) oil from the GAS/OIL mixture makes your AIR/FUEL mixture RICHER, effectively making your engine run RICHER (more smoking/spooge) . If you remove oil from your premix mixture, you have more gas in a specific amount of fuel. Making the mixture that really matters, the air/fuel mixture, richer. Do not fix jetting issues by changing your premix ratio.
      If you guys like this little article, it would be nice if we could get this stickied in all of the two-stroke forums, to avoid the same questions being asked over and over again.
      I hope this helps.