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dirtdude723

Which would you do first, offroad flywheel or Rekluse? (I realize both is the optimal setup)

40 posts in this topic

While I realize and fully intend in time to install both an offroad flywheel and a rekluse clutch I am curious given one or the other which most would elect to do first or consider the more beneficial.

 

I ride tight trails and hare scrambles and rarely MX so my bike is a woods bike 90% of the time and thus the interest in a flywheel and Rekluse to make it more user friendly at slow speed and lower RPM in the tight woods, obviously.

 

I'm just curious which people would say to add first if you were only going to have one for a while before adding the other.

 

I intend to do one this week and the other a little later on.

 

Oh I have a 2009 YZ 450 F if that matters or helps.

 

Thanks

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I ride a 09 yz450f primarily in the woods. The gytr heavy flywheel and 13/51 sprockets helped a ton. But if you are going to get a rekluse eventually I would suggest doing that first. You might not even feel the need for the flywheel after the new clutch.

Dont know which rekluse you had in mind but you could put that flywheel money towards upgrading to at least the zstart pro. I dont like the idea of using fewer plates than stock like the cheaper rekluse does in a bike that shares oil all throughout clutch/trans/motor.

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I ride a 09 yz450f primarily in the woods. The gytr heavy flywheel and 13/51 sprockets helped a ton. But if you are going to get a rekluse eventually I would suggest doing that first. You might not even feel the need for the flywheel after the new clutch.

Dont know which rekluse you had in mind but you could put that flywheel money towards upgrading to at least the zstart pro. I dont like the idea of using fewer plates than stock like the cheaper rekluse does in a bike that shares oil all throughout clutch/trans/motor.

I have an 09 with a Rekluse Pro and feel no need for a flywheel.

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Of the two, the Rekluse is more effective at preventing stalling and making the tall first gear of the YZ more usable.  The Z-Start Pro is considerably better than the EXP in terms of operation, "tunability", and power holding ability.  Worth the difference.

 

The flywheel, however is still a significant improvement.  It makes the lower 2000 RPM of the power range smoother, and actually adds power at the very bottom, while taking nothing at all noticeable away from the top end performance or acceleration. 

 

Do both, definitely.

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I have an extra flywheel weight for sale ($50 + shipping) of your interested. The heavy one not stock.

Pm me

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While I realize and fully intend in time to install both an offroad flywheel and a rekluse clutch I am curious given one or the other which most would elect to do first or consider the more beneficial.

 

I ride tight trails and hare scrambles and rarely MX so my bike is a woods bike 90% of the time and thus the interest in a flywheel and Rekluse to make it more user friendly at slow speed and lower RPM in the tight woods, obviously.

 

I'm just curious which people would say to add first if you were only going to have one for a while before adding the other.

 

I intend to do one this week and the other a little later on.

 

Oh I have a 2009 YZ 450 F if that matters or helps.

 

Thanks

 

Have you ridden a bike with a rekluse before? They aren't for everyone. However, with their 30 day trial period there is really no reason to not try one. I say try the rekluse and if it's not as good as you hoped for just send it back for a refund and buy the flywheel weight.

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Do the Rekluse 1st. Like Woods-Rider said, 30 days you can send it back. I agree with Gray, do the Pro version, I didn't like EXP for offroad. The auto clutch is tunable so you can get a smoother power delivery like having a flywheel weight. IMO the biggest bennefit to the flywheel weight is its ability in keeping the motor turning at lower RPM's.

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That is the biggest benefit, but how that manifests itself with the Rekluse is in how much smoother the engine is at the bottom of its range. 

 

Even underway, at low speeds, and even under a fairly heavy load, the single cylinder engine fires every other time around, and slows down between then and the next power stroke.  The rotational speed lost must be recovered just to keep the bike speed apparently constant.  A heavier flywheel reduces the amount of that deceleration, and so, the amount of power the engine has to produce on the following power cycle to stay even.  You can feel the difference. 

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I have the Rekluse 3.0 (just the disk) in my 2011 YZ 450f and I love it.  I personally think it can handle woods riding and I have not had any fade on 2-3 hour rides. 

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I've ridden an '11 yz450 extensively on extremely tight 1st gear trails all the way to mx.  All that has been done to the bike is proper suspension springs, s/a end cap and the Rekluse Core exp.  Definately the best do-all bike I have ever ridden.  Coming off a yz250f, I had to constantly remind myself to relax and just ride a gear or two high on the 450 and just try and get a good flow going.  Kinda hard to do when owning a 250f, but once I got the hang of it, it was pure magic.

Edited by basslips

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It sounds like the reckluse has your name all over it especially if this is gonna be a woods weapon on tight trails and I don't even have one I have a fly wheel weight and slightly lower gearing and it did make a nice difference in the trails. I'm not against a reckluse a hundred dollar fly wheel weight was also lot cheaper witch was a consideration for me and was a big enough difference too make me happy for my occasional trail ride. You could not even hold the bike at a steady speed at low rpm before now I am able too do that. Too sum it up it gave me much smother throttle control at low rpms I really didn't see any down side too it.

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I would never install an auto clutch in my bike so my answer is flywheel.

Have you ever tried one? I won't ride another without!

Probably 100% of endurocross riders use them, a lot of GNCC riders and now some motocross guys.

Here's a little known fact about Ricky Carmichael. He was using a type of auto clutch the first year he went to a 4 stroke in the outdoor series. The main reason was to not stall and try and kick and kick and kick to restart.

Edited by Gunner354

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Thanks for all the input, lots of interesting takes on both.

 

I found a used Z Start Pro on eBay for $350, so figured I'd give it a go. I have ridden a bike with one and yes it was definitely strange at first, but that fact that you can still use the clutch if you want is a nice option although from what I've been told and read you won't/don't need to.

 

I will give the Rekluse a chance and see what I think, worst case I can always sell it and likely not lose much.

 

May give the flywheel a shot later too.

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but that fact that you can still use the clutch if you want is a nice option although from what I've been told and read you won't/don't need to.

FYI, the auto clutch won't get rid of the pop stalls so aggressive corner to corner riding and technical up hills still require a finger on the clutch lever to avoid.

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Does the Rekluse allow any engine braking at all? Can you rev the engine till the clutch engages like a snowmobile?

 

The Rekluse is a centrifugal auto-engaging clutch.  As long as the engine speed is above the pre-set stall speed, the clutch is engaged, including on deceleration, so yes, you have totally normal engine braking with one.  What you will not have is the ability to bump start the engine (both EXP models will allow this if temporarily readjusted to).  Also, if you are idling in gear, and push off down a hill that way, the bike will coast as if in neutral until you blip the throttle, at which point the clutch will engage, and engine braking returns.

 

The stall RPM, or engagement point, is adjustable, and is usually set to just above an idle.  The effect on take off is very much like a car with an automatic transmission, except there is little or no tendency to creep at idle.

 

FYI, the auto clutch won't get rid of the pop stalls so aggressive corner to corner riding and technical up hills still require a finger on the clutch lever to avoid.

 

Explain what you mean by "pop stalls".  When correctly set up, brake stalling is nearly non-existent.  Still can happen, but not very often.

 

Thanks for all the input, lots of interesting takes on both.

 

I found a used Z Start Pro on eBay for $350, so figured I'd give it a go. I have ridden a bike with one and yes it was definitely strange at first, but that fact that you can still use the clutch if you want is a nice option although from what I've been told and read you won't/don't need to.

 

I will give the Rekluse a chance and see what I think, worst case I can always sell it and likely not lose much.

 

May give the flywheel a shot later too.

 

That's how I got mine.  Great deal.  If you don't get the manual with it, you really need it.  Download one from Rekluse's web site. 

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Explain what you mean by "pop stalls".  When correctly set up, brake stalling is nearly non-existent.  Still can happen, but not very often.

That irritating little thing 4strks seem to do when to much throttle is given at to low of RPM's and normally happens at the most inopportune moments. Just stating the auto clutch doesn't get rid of this so its good to have a finger on the lever in certain conditions.

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