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700rScott

Adding a WR coolant reservoir to a YZ?

22 posts in this topic

I'm trying to add a WR coolant bottle to my YZ450 and I've seen it done before on here but I can't find it now. I have it in the location of where the WR has it but when I bolted it up to the inside of the rear fender it sticks out into the wheel area. Dose anyone have any info on how to do this? I'll get pics tomorrow of how it's done now. Thanks

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This how I had it yesterday.

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BC518DD9-7D9A-492C-8E61-9AB8168A7573_zps

With some playing around I got it where I think it will work. I had two spacers I had left over from my truck tool box so I used them and they worked perfectly.

4F1B614D-3308-4F3E-8777-22682AAD46F0_zps

2D2B8C44-E32A-4A93-BFF5-9253932E0566_zps

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Don't waste your time and just install Evans coolant and you will never have to worry about boil overs again. It is unlike any other coolant on the market. It contains no water and it's boiling temp is somewhere around 400*

Edited by Gunner354

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Water is the best coolant for getting the heat out and with the bottle already done I'll stick to a 50/50 mix. I've heard about that stuff so unless I have a problem with the tank still boiling over I'll look at it.

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use some washers and a longer bolt to push the bottle out-away from the tire -  I did this on my WR400 when I slightly bent the subframe- worked just fine.

 

If your boiling over ditch the stock rad cap and go to a higher rated cap.

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Water is the best coolant for getting the heat out and with the bottle already done I'll stick to a 50/50 mix. I've heard about that stuff so unless I have a problem with the tank still boiling over I'll look at it.

Water also boils at a lower pressure which means water does no good when it's on the ground.

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Water also boils at a lower pressure which means water does no good when it's on the ground.

Huh?

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Water boils at whatever pressure happens to exist in the cooling system.  It is often a good enough coolant that it doesn't boil at all because it keeps the engine temperature down that well.  No better coolant exists than distilled water with a mild surfactant like Redline's Water Wetter in terms of the ability to remove heat from the engine.

 

The real problem is simply that the bike gets ridden in ways that bring the air flow over the radiators down to nearly nothing, so the actual cure for the problem is to do something to correct that like go faster, or always ride into the wind.  Since these two options are not always feasible, fans are the next best.

 

Ultra high temp coolants avoid the boil over problem, but they also allow the engine to run that much hotter before boiling.  The argument that coolant not in the system does no good has some obvious factual underpinning, but letting my engine operate at 400 degrees coolant temp doesn't appeal to me at all, thanks.

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Water also boils at a lower pressure which means water does no good when it's on the ground.

Mean it's worse at higher altitudes? I'm pretty close to sea level so it will boil at 212 and if it boils over I guess I have to learn how to ride better but it's better to have that than run the motor hotter than what it's meant to be operated like Gray said. The coolant tank is more for expansion than keeping it cooler. If the bike boils then the coolant goes into the tank then when it cools down it gets sucked back into the tank. If you didn't have that then when it boils over and then cools down, it will be low on coolant.

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Water boils at whatever pressure happens to exist in the cooling system. It is often a good enough coolant that it doesn't boil at all because it keeps the engine temperature down that well. No better coolant exists than distilled water with a mild surfactant like Redline's Water Wetter in terms of the ability to remove heat from the engine.

The real problem is simply that the bike gets ridden in ways that bring the air flow over the radiators down to nearly nothing, so the actual cure for the problem is to do something to correct that like go faster, or always ride into the wind. Since these two options are not always feasible, fans are the next best.

Ultra high temp coolants avoid the boil over problem, but they also allow the engine to run that much hotter before boiling. The argument that coolant not in the system does no good has some obvious factual underpinning, but letting my engine operate at 400 degrees coolant temp doesn't appeal to me at all, thanks.

I'm not letting my engine run at 400* because I am aware of scenarios that would make my engine run above normal temps and avoid them. But at least if I get into those hot scenarios I am not losing any coolant and starting the viscous circle of death. There was an article in one of the mags a couple of months ago that addressed this very topic. Cooling fans, overflow tanks etc. The magazine stated " just install Evans coolant and forget about it" Keep it simple or make it complicated? I'm into simplicity. Edited by Gunner354

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I'm not letting my engine run at 400* because I am aware of scenarios that would make my engine run above normal temps and avoid them. But at least if I get into those hot scenarios I am not losing any coolant and starting the viscous circle of death. There was an article in one of the mags a couple of months ago that addressed this very topic. Cooling fans, overflow tanks etc. The magazine stated " just install Evans coolant and forget about it" Keep it simple or make it complicated? I'm into simplicity.

 

It kinda sounds like an ad or evans coolant paid to have it out there. if it was that simple why dose the manufacture put the reservoirs and fans on their machines?

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It kinda sounds like an ad or evans coolant paid to have it out there. if it was that simple why dose the manufacture put the reservoirs and fans on their machines?

Paid ad? Really stretching on that one! As far as manufactures putting fans, reservoirs on stock bikes and not Evans. Probably the same reasons they don't put after market pipes, GYTR goodies and so on.
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If it really worked would they take the short cut and save money? They make their products to last so that's why they don't do those parts. The guys know what they are doing or think they know what they are doing do the mods. When you try to extract the most power out you sacrifice the longevity of the product. I have a 86 trx that still runs with the original internals because of it being stock. I had issues with my wolverine and raptor because I'm trying to get the most out of them and I'm ok with rebuilding every so often. I understand that the Evans product works but I wouldn't want to run that stuff since it will do more harm in the long run then adding the reservoir.

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The reason that manufacturers that build bikes that are expected to experience low speed/high stress operation conditions with fans and reservoirs instead of Evans coolant is two-fold.  One, the fans and overflow recovery bottle are actual cures for the problem, the first of which is lack of air flow, while ultra high-boil point coolants are "band-aid" fixes.   The second reason is that even without a particularly inclusive warranty policy, the manufacturers still have to concern themselves with making the bike as reliable as possible, and setting it up to run near 5-600 degree head temperatures is not conducive to that.   Keeping the temperature down in normal ranges is.

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The reason that manufacturers that build bikes that are expected to experience low speed/high stress operation conditions with fans and reservoirs instead of Evans coolant is two-fold. One, the fans and overflow recovery bottle are actual cures for the problem, the first of which is lack of air flow, while ultra high-boil point coolants are "band-aid" fixes. The second reason is that even without a particularly inclusive warranty policy, the manufacturers still have to concern themselves with making the bike as reliable as possible, and setting it up to run near 5-600 degree head temperatures is not conducive to that. Keeping the temperature down in normal ranges is.

So if the coolant is on the ground or all in the recovery tank then what do you think the head temp is? I would bet much higher than Evans that is still in the motor removing heat. But I remember someone that said the Rekluse was worthless but now uses one. Edited by Gunner354
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If there was a functional fan system on board, why would it boil? 

 

And don't mis-attribute things to me anymore.  I will consider it a form of trolling.

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So if the coolant is on the ground or all in the recovery tank then what do you think the head temp is? I would bet much higher than Evans that is still in the motor removing heat. But I remember someone that said the Rekluse was worthless but now uses one.

How much do they pay you to push this stuff? A reservoir is more of a perminate and a few guys that ive talked to didn't think I would need a fan but if I do over heat I'll be putting a fan on the bike. I would rather do it right than take the short cut with that stuff.

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The recovery bottle scheme only works if you let it cool down and recover the coolant.  The stuff in the bottle doesn't cool anything.  Having it in the bottle as opposed to the bottom of the ravine you happen to find yourself in when it boils will at least allow the bike to do that, though.  It is still necessary once it tosses most of the coolant off to let it chill for a bit. 

 

Ideally, a set of fans is the ultimate cure for the problem.   The trouble with fanning a YZF is that there's no surplus electricity on board to do it with.  A lot of guys that fan them choose DC computer chassis fans and power them with a a couple of 9 volts off a switch, running them only when things get tight.

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I saw a spal fan that I could hook up to the trail tech battery and hopefully the HD stator would be able to supply them and the lights if needed. I figured I would try it with out the fans to see how she runs. I know the tank dose nothing for cooling only to let it suck the coolant back in once it cools back down. I would have loved to have the WR but there wasn't any in my area that were used for sale so hopefully the YZ will handle the trails without to many over heating issues. I just have to remember when I'm stopped to shut her down.

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