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shakey0818

Starting a bike in the cold

22 posts in this topic

I did a quick search but found nothing.I have a 2001 wr-426f and i love the bike.I live in RI and it's getting cold as balls here.Up intill now i been taking short 10 min rides every day.I keep the bike in a un insulated shed with no heat.Last couple of days i been trying to start it and it don't want to kick over it don't even seem like it wants to start.The bikes a bitch to start anyway.After every ride i shut off the gas.Other than that i do nothing else.Could it be the thick cold oil.I know theres a simple answer but it escapes me.I was thinking of throwing a heater under the engine for an hr or so before trying it again tomorrow.We just got 4 in of snow and i wanted to try it out with the stock tires on it.

 

Thanks Rob

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I did a quick search but found nothing.I have a 2001 wr-426f and i love the bike.I live in RI and it's getting cold as balls here.Up intill now i been taking short 10 min rides every day.I keep the bike in a un insulated shed with no heat.Last couple of days i been trying to start it and it don't want to kick over it don't even seem like it wants to start.The bikes a bitch to start anyway.After every ride i shut off the gas.Other than that i do nothing else.Could it be the thick cold oil.I know theres a simple answer but it escapes me.I was thinking of throwing a heater under the engine for an hr or so before trying it again tomorrow.We just got 4 in of snow and i wanted to try it out with the stock tires on it.

 

Thanks Rob

You need to use a thinner oil, like a 0w-40, my crf will not start below freezing with thick oil

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You need to use a thinner oil, like a 0w-40, my crf will not start below freezing with thick oil

 

 

Ty i will change the oil this week.

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Oil's not a biggie. You have to charge the cylinder up with gas when its cold out.

Tip the bike to its side until some gas spews out the carb overflow tubes, now two squirts of throttle, choke on, kick no throttle. She should fire right up in one to two kicks..

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my 02 - 426 start just as easy in the sub 30 temps here in Michigan as it does in the summer time. just do the start drill do not touch the throttle and fires first or second kick.

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does that bike have a hot start?  If yes after you twist the throttle wide open 3-4 times, choke on, pull out the red hot start button ... i use mine all the time when cold.

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does that bike have a hot start? If yes after you twist the throttle wide open 3-4 times, choke on, pull out the red hot start button ... i use mine all the time when cold.

Yes it does.I'll give that a shot as well.

Tnx for all the responses guys.

Edited by shakey0818

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You can put in a larger power jet, for cold weather, and it will still work fine in the hotter weather, as you will use the choke much less.

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does that bike have a hot start?  If yes after you twist the throttle wide open 3-4 times, choke on, pull out the red hot start button ... i use mine all the time when cold.

 

Using hot start and choke together is total insanity, they each do the exact opposite. Hot start shuts off fuel (kind of), choke dumps more fuel in.

 

A bike will start fairly easily in the cold if it is jetted properly, valves adjusted properly, choke is on, and the compression and spark are good.

 

Usually if a bike has problems running in the cold the pilot is clogged

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Using hot start and choke together is total insanity

maybe in CA .. but in TX it has worked since the hot start came out ... btw ... hot start is really a high idle by-pass circuit.

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Using hot start and choke together is total insanity, they each do the exact opposite. Hot start shuts off fuel (kind of), choke dumps more fuel in.

 

A bike will start fairly easily in the cold if it is jetted properly, valves adjusted properly, choke is on, and the compression and spark are good.

 

Usually if a bike has problems running in the cold the pilot is clogged

Nope.

The choke adds more fuel and more air at the same time by opening two bypass holes. One is air and one is for a vacuum over the power jet, to suck fuel.

The hot start is an 'air leak' for the pilot circuit adding only air. It's primary purpose is to cool the combustion chamber after a stall.

Using the hot start with the choke just adds more air volume.

Proper jetting is not so easy when it's 0 degrees at start up and 35 degrees 1 hour later, and getting hotter as the day goes on.

The air density changes radically, and you have to jet it for riding, not starting if you want to ride, and learn how to trick the carb to get it started.

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Nope.

The choke adds more fuel and more air at the same time by opening two bypass holes. One is air and one is for a vacuum over the power jet, to suck fuel.

The hot start is an 'air leak' for the pilot circuit adding only air. It's primary purpose is to cool the combustion chamber after a stall.

Using the hot start with the choke just adds more air volume.

Proper jetting is not so easy when it's 0 degrees at start up and 35 degrees 1 hour later, and getting hotter as the day goes on.

The air density changes radically, and you have to jet it for riding, not starting if you want to ride, and learn how to trick the carb to get it started.

 

I was giving him the simple stupid version.

 

It sounds like he probably doesn't have the bike jetted properly to begin with.

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I doubt it's the oil.  BTW I would NOT run a 0 weight oil, that's just beginning for a blown motor.  Usually 0 weights are put in brand new motors for a short while, because the rings aren't broken in yet. Use the recommended weight from the service manual.

 

Has the bike been sitting for a while? If so it could be a clogged jet, or simply old gas.

 

When is the last time you checked the valves ?

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I feel like an azz for saying this out loud but im a wicked newbie nobb.After cleaning the carb and plugs a few times with no luck i found the problem.The black adjustment knob near the 2 chokes that goes to the other side of the carb near the throttle was out.It was in the hole but not screwed in.I screwed it in and kept trying to start it till it started.Other than keeping the choke out it ran great.I didn't want to ride on the beach where there's no place to start it if it stalls so i kept the choke out.I hit a few small  jumps and man i don't know how u guys do it i was nervous.I did manage to pull some of my best wheelies.I am finding that not being able to shift yet during a wheelie makes it tough in second gear cause it has a short distance before it wants you to shift.So what i do and it helps me with the balancing part is not using the clutch at all and starting in 3rd.I'm just learning on how to use the rear brake as well.I find that trying to use the clutch during the wheelie is tough cause it takes 3 fingers to pull in its so tight.Any way it was a great little ride and i am so very thankful to you guys for all the help.I will be having it tuned up and jets checked soon.It only has less than 650 original miles on it so i think i'm good for now.

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Nope.

The choke adds more fuel and more air at the same time by opening two bypass holes. One is air and one is for a vacuum over the power jet, to suck fuel.

The hot start is an 'air leak' for the pilot circuit adding only air. It's primary purpose is to cool the combustion chamber after a stall.

Using the hot start with the choke just adds more air volume.

Proper jetting is not so easy when it's 0 degrees at start up and 35 degrees 1 hour later, and getting hotter as the day goes on.

The air density changes radically, and you have to jet it for riding, not starting if you want to ride, and learn how to trick the carb to get it started.

I thought the choke cuts off air, hints the name, choke?

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Since I started using the Yamaha 0-40 oil that has a snowmobile on the label my bike has started ten times better in the cold. I'll change the oil after two rides instead of three.  Also I kick it threw a few times before I turn it on, maybe this does nothing, but seems to help my bike. It usauly starts second kick after sitting for a week in below freezing temps. I'll switch back to the regular oil at the end of Febuary.

Edited by cwallershasta

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Oil's not a biggie. You have to charge the cylinder up with gas when its cold out.

Tip the bike to its side until some gas spews out the carb overflow tubes, now two squirts of throttle, choke on, kick no throttle. She should fire right up in one to two kicks..

This^^^  works every time for me in the bitter cold.

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Since I started using the Yamaha 0-40 oil that has a snowmobile on the label my bike has started ten times better in the cold. I'll change the oil after two rides instead of three.  Also I kick it threw a few times before I turn it on, maybe this does nothing, but seems to help my bike. It usauly starts second kick after sitting for a week in below freezing temps. I'll switch back to the regular oil at the end of Febuary.

 

I like it when people follow my advice and it works.

 

0W-40 oil is fine year round, when the bike is cold the oil it is still thicker than when the bike is hot; you will never blow up a motor due to too low of a "winter" rating.

 

In fact, running too thick an oil when the bikes is cold can cause oil starvation since it is harder to pump.

Edited by mudguy

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