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writebrian

Need a little clutch help 2006 YZ450F

16 posts in this topic

So while you guys were stuffing your faces with turkey, I went for a good long ride with some friends today. Bike was performing beautifully as usual and the chase was on until we hit my achilles… SAND. Got caught in a deep wash we couldn't find a trail out of for about 3 miles. I was on the clutch for way too long and riding a gear too high and bike started to overheat a bit and clutch started to slip badly!

 

Bike was definitely overheating from the load and spewing a little oil from breather tube (but level was fine back at truck) I was able to finish the ride but clutch would not engage until clutch lever was let out 98% of the way. Tightened clutch adjust a little and it help slightly. We could smell the clutch as well on the ride back. Thought maybe a cool down would salvage it but after an hour at the truck did a quick loop and same feel. Bike is ridable but has a definite clutch slip going on. 

 

Want to know what your thoughts are. Can I salvage it with a little manual deglazing or should I consider it toast? Do you sand the fibers or steels when trying to deglaze? How hard is clutch work for a less than stellar wrencher like myself?

 

I'm kinda broke right now and in the middle of AZ's riding season so if there is anything I can try to get me back in the dirt ASAP let me know. I have FAR more time than money right now. 

 

Any input appreciated!

Edited by grayracer513

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It's done for.  Tusk replacement clutch packs can be had at reasonable prices, I haven't actually run one in a bike (yet) but I have 2 of them.

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Don't know about de-glazing, and if it were my bike I would replace it. But it's not so here's a couple cheap things you can try (again I wouldn't for my bike, but this is your issue). You could try replacing the springs with heavier ones to put a little more bite on the friction plates. A really cheap way to do essentially the same thing is to use washers with the existing springs and bolts to put more pressure on the plates. However both of those things would be a temporary fix at best and will probably fry what remains of your clutch, if they help at all. By the way, rocky mountain has a clutch kit with heavy springs for your bike for $55.

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From a mechanical perspective, what did I damage on the clutch? Did I wear all the fiber down so the clutch plate can no longer 'squeeze' enough? If i know what actually changed your explanations will make more sense. I am mechanically challenged.

Edited by writebrian

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The friction plates have little to no friction material left which makes them slip easier.  The steel plates are probably glazed badly (allowing for slip) from the heat, and may be warped causing engagement issues.

Edited by cowboyona426

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As the clutch heats up, the critical thing to keep track of is free play.  If you run out of it, it's like pulling the lever part way and holding it while you ride; the clutch will slip and the whole thing will spiral out of control; it slips, gets hotter, looses more free play, and eventually won't move any more. 

 

They can take a lot of abuse, though.  As long as the steel plates are still flat, you can clean them up with Scotch Brite and reuse them.  Stick with OEM Yamaha plates.  They are well worth the additional expense. 

 

Clutch work is easy, particularly on the YZF, as you don't loose a significant amount of oil when you open it up.

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As the clutch heats up, the critical thing to keep track of is free play.  If you run out of it, it's like pulling the lever part way and holding it while you ride; the clutch will slip and the whole thing will spiral out of control; it slips, gets hotter, looses more free play, and eventually won't move any more. 

 

They can take a lot of abuse, though.  As long as the steel plates are still flat, you can clean them up with Scotch Brite and reuse them.  Stick with OEM Yamaha plates.  They are well worth the additional expense. 

 

Clutch work is easy, particularly on the YZF, as you don't loose a significant amount of oil when you open it up.

 

To add to that, if you lay the bike over on it's side while you are working, the oil loss will be negligible.

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So you are saying I may be able to salvage the steel plates and only replace the fibers? Or that refurbing the steel plates may restore the clutch operation until I can buy a new set. Can steel plates be bad and not fiber plates? What about vice versa? 

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I'm gonna go with a new complete kit. Found the Tusk with heavy duty springs for $49.99 shipped.

 

Gray, do you have the torq speq for the 5 bolts holding the pressure plate?

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I don't doubt they are worth the additional expense. Problem is I don't have the additional money!  I'm a fast C trail rider and don't really stress my bike or engine much. I have had great success with Tusk parts and they fit my meager budget. I might use the OEM steel again if it's in good shape though.

 

Looks like 7.2 ft lbs. Thanks!

Edited by writebrian

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Hey man the tusk clutch kit is not to bad lol I have one on my kawee 4 smoker .. Wow the clutch has been in there since 2010 lol still.running.strong .. And I beat.the.piss out of my bike lol but im allways on top of it repairing it all the time keeping things tight and some broken parts hear and there so ya go with Tusk I had a Hinson but smoked it.one day so tryed the Tusk loved .. Just Dont buy there Head Gaskets I think there Junk I got one month out of one after I did a winter complete motor rebuild . Go with a Comitic Gasket ! Little.more money.but with it I think ..

Edited by jimbanshee11

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I don't doubt they are worth the additional expense. Problem is I don't have the additional money!  I'm a fast C trail rider and don't really stress my bike or engine much. I have had great success with Tusk parts and they fit my meager budget. I might use the OEM steel again if it's in good shape though.

 

Looks like 7.2 ft lbs. Thanks!

 

Why mess with questionable used parts?  Throw the complete Tusk clutch pack in there and be done.

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Took it apart today. Wanted to show you what the plates look like while I wait for my new clutch to come in. I'm going to replace the whole thing but maybe there is something else to be learned in the process. 

 

What do you think of the friction plates and clutch plates below? The clutch plates look a little dark to me. The ones nearest the engine were still silver, about half way out they all turned black. The friction plates all look about the same. Also there are nicks in the 'posts' that hold the pressure plate in place like it has been bouncing around in there. Any advise on that situation. They show plainly in the final pic.

 

photo 2.JPG

photo 3.JPG

photo 4.JPG

Edited by writebrian

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The grooving in the spring pegs is not a concern.  It's just from the springs vibrating. 

 

The clutch plates should be evaluated by their thickness and by how flat they are.  Lay them on a glass sheet to check flatness. 

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