Losing control in jumps

I recently made the transition from a TTR225 to a WR450F.

Yesterday was my first trip to the track and I layed her down four times. I haven't layed a bike over in six months prior to this.

I'm older and larger being 40yrs old @ 6'2"/230lbs so I don't ride fast or get much air. My biggest problem is losing control in a small set of double-doubles (6'-8'). The first set I take nicely but the second set gets the bike out of control in a hurry. I did manage to clear a large double (12'-14'/for me) that I could not make on my TTR since it was about 40' out of a u-turn.

Also the bike wants to fall over on table top landings if I come even a little sideways in the air, not forgiving at all....

I'm really curious if anyone else has had such a hard time transitioning to the WR. It's sorta taking the fun out of riding.

Thanks,

Rich

I had similar issues with my WR450 and found out that the bike is ideal for a much smaller rider (like 170 pounds). I'm 6' and 200 pounds and my bike was all over the place in whoops, etc. I had my suspension re-done with stifer springs (front and rear) - and now the bike now handles much better.

I'm older and larger being 40yrs old @ 6'2"/230lbs so I don't ride fast or get much air.

Forty is far from old and 230 at 6-2 ain't that large.

I'd take a look at the not riding fast.

Top heavy bikes, like I feel my WR's are, IMO require more speed to achieve an equal amount of stability as a smaller lighter bike. I know my old CR250 would make the same jumps with less speed than my 426.

I'd try increasing your speed before the jumpface and riding a little more aggressively. My WR's love to be ridden hard!!! :)

See Ya,

Kelly

Thanks for the heads-up. I purchased the bike with the impression it would not need resuspending, perhaps it was wrong. I was considering a stabilizer, does it help with this problem or a waste of money?

Thanks,

Rich

I'd consider a stabilizer for high speed riding situations or lots of whoops.

At 44 and 170 I had one of my WR's revalved for less bottoming. Even with the comp in some I would blow through the stroke and on bigger landings.

Heavier springs will be a must when you step up to some bigger jumps.

Later,

Kelly

Rich, You might try a steering stabilizer to help keep it in line while airborne. The front wheel will act like a big gyro and twist you around it, especially if it is spinning faster than your used to (225 to 450 right?). If you are somehow hitting the smaller double slower than on the TTR then you would get less gyroscopic stabilization. Also keep your foot placement and peg weighting in mind while up in the air. I can steer my bike while standing on the pegs, not holding the bars, by just pushing more weight on the left or right pegs. The same applies for while youre off the ground. I know that my 6'1" 215lb self would like to respring mine for my weight because the stockers are, I belive, set for a 170lb rider. Also you might try to play with the suspension settings, they are there for a reason and I'm sure there must be a few posts on dialing the setup somewhere here in TT land. BTW, did you get the bike at Perrys Yamaha in Pascagoula, MS? I got my '03 WR450 from Steve there :). I used to work as a mechanic there part time before I got transferred to Puerto Rico (U.S.Navy).

Yeah, I almost bit it four times myself (I WAS LUCKY THAT DAY). I did the exact same things when I first got my WR. Stock the bike is set for trails and woods, not a MX track. I guess you are bottoming the forks on every jump, and the rebound is kicking your rear end side ways. You need to make the bike stiffer all the way around. I would crank the compression on the forks two click more compression and take a lap, then increase the rear compression by two, then take a lap. After a few laps the front end will stop washing out(lateral on landing) and the back will stop kicking up. Go by feel. Keep track of your starting point and all of your changes. Have someone watch you so they can see what the bike is doing, front to soft/stiff, back bottoming out, ect...good luck

I recently made the transition from a TTR225 to a WR450F.

Yesterday was my first trip to the track and I layed her down four times. I haven't layed a bike over in six months prior to this.

I'm older and larger being 40yrs old @ 6'2"/230lbs so I don't ride fast or get much air. My biggest problem is losing control in a small set of double-doubles (6'-8'). The first set I take nicely but the second set gets the bike out of control in a hurry. I did manage to clear a large double (12'-14'/for me) that I could not make on my TTR since it was about 40' out of a u-turn.

Also the bike wants to fall over on table top landings if I come even a little sideways in the air, not forgiving at all....

I'm really curious if anyone else has had such a hard time transitioning to the WR. It's sorta taking the fun out of riding.

Thanks,

Rich

I used to be very afraid of jumping and riding tracks in general...been hurt pretty bad before on them. But in the last couple of years I've started riding tracks to mainly focus on cornering and just getting more seat time. As my comfort level has increased on the track so has my frequency in riding them. Now if I'm not out in the desert I'll spend the day at the track.

It sounds like you have a couple of issues that need to be dealt with. One, being suspension, for your weight you are way too heavy for the suspension to work properly. This bike is generally sprung for someone who is better that forty pounds lighter than you are. So the problem is that with you just sitting on the bike your suspension is already partially through the compression stroke. So if you started with 11 inches of travel no you only have say half as much because of the bike being under sprung for your weight. This is probably one reason why the bike rebounds like a ping pong ball off the jumps (your bottoming the suspension). I also agree on the speed thing, the force of the spinning wheels is going to help to keep you upright. But if you're just poking along and basically coming to a stop on the landings it's pretty hard to stay upright. Also, try riding the track a gear taller than you normally would this will help in a couple of ways. One, it will make the bike much more predictable on what it is going to do in the air. Second, it sounds like you might be spinning the rear tire when leaving the ramp causing it to throw you sideways. Riding a gear taller and just rolling the throttle will help prevent this from happening.

Hope this helped,

Just my .02

A buddy was getting crossed up off of jump faces until we measured the rear axle and it was about 1/8" different from the swingarm shaft to the axle from one side to the other. We set it to run even and his problem went away. My .02---WR Dave.

Hi Mopar!

I wish we could have gotten together for a ride at Irvington! I couldn't jump the double-double with the TTR due to lack of suspension. That always ended-up being four singles. I think my speed is ok, albeit slow at 1/2 rpm in second but I am bouncing off the limiter occasionally.

Perry's didn't have the WR in stock and had no expected delivery date. I did buy the baby Raptor (my daughter's first place trophy on the raptor http://www.dirttrails.com/Photos/PhotoDetail.aspx?mi=6320&ci=0&pdi=-1&st=&pg=1&as=False&p=1943 ) and second TTR125 (my daughter Lindsey at the Mobile pit http://www.dirttrails.com/Photos/PhotoDetail.aspx?mi=6320&ci=0&pdi=-1&st=&pg=1&as=False&p=1498 ) from them though. If you make it back in town I have a Ranger 185VS that would love to support our troops!

Hi Gearom,

I'm not even close to bottom the suspension. I checked the front fork dirt marks and she's only taking about half of the stroke through the whole track. My sag is 3.5" on the rear and about 1" on the front.

Hiya's Dez,

I went to one spring site they they placed the stock springs at about 220lbs, so I didn't think I was that far off. I may be spinning the tire at the end of the ramp but I've been trying to pay attention to every little detail since she was acting so squirlly (i.e. foot placement, arm positioning, body lean, throttle roll-on, etc).

Wr Dave,

You may have hit 1/2 of the problem. I checked the alignment marks and bingo, almost a whole line off from the factory. I've been reading about suspension adjustment and the other part seems to be the rear spring not rebounding quickly enough, packing.

Thanks all!!! I'll adjust the rear tire straight to the marks and decrease the rebound pressure and see how she holds-up next time at the track, probably Monday.

Thanks again :)

Rich

hey Oouthere,

I am similar to you in size. 245 lbs. 6'1". I changed my rear shock spring to a 5.8 and now I jam through the whoops. I did not re-spring my forks yet. The heavier rear spring was a quick, cheap, easy fix. Mine was an ebach spring that I found in the recycler for like $35. It made a big difference on my bike. I have been very happy with it. It has been working so good for me that I have not been motivated to respring my forks. Anyway, you might want to try it, leave plenty of sag.

I feel the same way Husky does the the bike will handle

better when road hard, I now that at 47yrs old the thought

of pain is more to the front of my brain then when I was

20, also a stiffer rear spring will help with the extra

girth aquired with age. :)

Also they are top heavy compared to say a CR, and I have

found that you have to think a lot farther ahead, due to

the fact they don't have that snap of a two stroke.

Enjoy Jerry :D

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