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Andrew Puetz

Steering Stabilizer for WR450F

18 posts in this topic

I am considering getting a steering stabilizer for my 2012 WR450F.  Has anyone installed one of these?  Are as they easy as they say(GPR V4 to be specific)?  Looks like I have to lose my handlebar foam protector when installed...  maybe not but looks tight in there.

 

I also want to know if anyone that has one thinks its worth it.  I do aggressive trail riding and some MX track,  Any notable PROS/CONS?  Thanks in advance

 

-Andy

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There are no cons to a steering damper unless you ride track and want to do scrubs or whips.

Scotts brand dampers are preferred by most. They have more feel, and more adjust-ability, and they last longer.

You need to decide what kind of mount is best for you; if you need to raise the bars anyway, a 'submount' is the go-to system.

 

Thousands of posts on the subject.

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GPR Stabilizers work great. You get lifetime, free service on GPR Stabilizers -- not so with Scotts Stabilizers.

Once you ride with any steering stabilizer, you will realize that all those others who have been riding with a stabilizer have been cheating.

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One big difference is the GPR damper dampens in both directions while the Scott's releases on return. Don't know how you can test which you would prefer unless you have friends that are running both types.

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Thanks for the info all.  I will look into Scotts as an option in addition to a GPR!  I was riding in some sandy areas this weekend and I certainly could have used one!!  Anyway looks like I have some research to do during the long winter!

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I had one (Scotts) on my 2006 and just need to get a mount for my 2012. It's amazing. It's kind of like going from standard definition TV to HD. You don't notice it that much when going to HD (adding the damper ), but when going back to standard definition (removing the damper) you don't know how you ever dealt with it that way.

Edited by woods-rider
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Nothing wrong with the GPR I have just seen a lot of those that were leaking fluid that weren't very old. 

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I put the GPR on my 2012.  I am happy with its performance so far, but only have a couple of long rides on it.  Riding in sand with the GPR is like turning on Stability Control.  I hit a grass-hidden hard-edge rut that probably would have ripped the bars from my hands without the damper. .. it definitely got my attention, but no drama developed because the damper did its job.  

 

The damping back-to-center was a little weird at first, in fact, I questioned my purchase on the "test" ride, but now I don't even notice it.  BTW, I've ridden Scott's-equipped bikes too & they work great as well.

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One big difference is the GPR damper dampens in both directions while the Scott's releases on return. Don't know how you can test which you would prefer unless you have friends that are running both types.

 

You can get a Scotts either way. Both directions is typically for street/roadracing applications, as you're trying prevent headshake/tankslappers and want it to dampen both directions. For dirt applications, Scotts only dampens outward, as you're trying to prevent bigger hits that would normally deflect the front wheel and jerk the rider's hands. No need to dampen on the return, that's just wasted energy for the rider.

 

So that's a plus for Scotts in my book. And yes I run a Scotts on my WR, and share it with my DRZ400 as well. Wouldn't ride without one.

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You can get a Scotts either way. Both directions is typically for street/roadracing applications, as you're trying prevent headshake/tankslappers and want it to dampen both directions. For dirt applications, Scotts only dampens outward, as you're trying to prevent bigger hits that would normally deflect the front wheel and jerk the rider's hands. No need to dampen on the return, that's just wasted energy for the rider.

 

So that's a plus for Scotts in my book. And yes I run a Scotts on my WR, and share it with my DRZ400 as well. Wouldn't ride without one.

Yeah, I just didn't know if the street one is adaptable for dirt as I have never heard of anyone using one.  Something like. "hey, instead of getting the GPR that dampends both ways, just get the Scotts street damper".  I had just never heard anyone put the comparison like that.  Good to point it out though.

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Yeah, I just didn't know if the street one is adaptable for dirt as I have never heard of anyone using one.  Something like. "hey, instead of getting the GPR that dampends both ways, just get the Scotts street damper".  I had just never heard anyone put the comparison like that.  Good to point it out though.

 

IIRC Scotts can change it, but it's not a user-serviceable thing.

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Yeah, I just didn't know if the street one is adaptable for dirt as I have never heard of anyone using one.  Something like. "hey, instead of getting the GPR that dampends both ways, just get the Scotts street damper".  I had just never heard anyone put the comparison like that.  Good to point it out though.

Its more common with a guy that has a street bike like an R1 and a dirt bike and will swap a damper back and forth. You will tend to find more used street dampers on EBAY as guys  total a bike and sell the unit. You can minimize the affect buy adjusting the sweep valve or we can revalve it and turn it into a dirt damper. We can not cost effectively turn a dirt damper to a street damper. 

Thanks-

 Eric

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Eric,  are any other modifications needed for the Scotts product, or does it just bolt on? 

Typically we are VERY bolt on and we do provide step by step instruction with color pictures to guide the install. Normally figure an hour for install. Depending on which year WR you have you might have to file a weld or two on the steel frame bikes and on the aluminum frame bikes there are two bumps on the front head tube that will need to be filed flush and again we show detail pics as to what is needed.

 Thanks-

 Eric

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Yeah, what he said, you just file down the bumps on the head tube, real easy. The instructions are easy to follow as well.

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I've had my GPR V4 since 2010 and it has seen a lot of use. I  have had not single problem with it. When I went to swap it from my YZ to WR the customer service dept was excellent.

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