sag question

It's the difference from fully extended (wheel off the ground) to weight with rider and bike.

Measured vertically from the axle.

Sir Thumpy,

I beleive there are three sag settings:

1) with suspension fully exptended.

2) with bike sitting vertically in the static position.

3) with you on the bike in riding position.

I think there is a corelation between one and two after determing number three. This will tell you if the spring rate is correct for your weight. I think I read this somewhere :D I swear :D

Don't know the formula though :)

Bill

ask John Curea...... he'll know.

Bill,

You did read it somewhere 'cause I did too. It is in MXA's technical section on there web site. I printed it off several months ago and still have a copy of it. It's titled "How to Dial in Your Shock". Here is the link: http://www.motocrossactionmag.com/readridingtips.asp?id=169

Happy reading.

Setting the sag - start with the bike fully extended - measure. You can measure at a static state, let the bike settle under its own weight & gravity. The static sag should be about 1 inch. If you have help, someone to hold the tape measure, full extend, sit in your normal riding position. This sag should be about 4 inches.

I'm 6' 185 pounds and went 2 1/4 turns stiffer from stock to get the sag right. Rebound up 2 clicks from stock.

When you adjust the sag, do you get your measurement by measuring the difference between the bike sitting under its own weight compared to you sitting on the bike, OR do you compare to the rear suspension topped out compared to you sitting on the bike?

Thanks!

The static sag should be between 15mm and 25mm if the spring is the correct rate for your weight. This is simply an indicator of how close the spring is once you get the sag set for your weight. And remember to stand on the pegs during the "rider on" measurement. Sitting on the seat can lead to significantly inaccurate readings.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now