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    Maintenance Readiness
    I hope you all have been out riding and enjoying spring. I got back into the hare scramble racing scene over the weekend after a three year hiatus and had a blast. Today, I just want to share a quick tip and start a discussion on preparatory things that help shorten the time it takes to do complex maintenance tasks, such as rebuilding an engine. Quick Tip Prior to turning a wrench carefully look over the service manual scanning through all the applicable procedures and subsystems. If I’m working on an unfamiliar model, I find it is helpful to jot down a rough outline of the disassembly sequence. This saves me time in the long run as I don’t have to rely as heavily on the service manual or continually flip through various sections. Another option is to use post-it notes to bookmark each relevant section in the manual. Mark the post-it notes with numbers or headings so you know where to turn to next. Earmarking or bookmarking the torque tables is also a huge time saver no matter the task.  Be sure to scan through the manual as well to identify any specialty tools that are required that you may not have. Discussion Points What other preparatory things can be done to help speed up the major maintenance process? Is there a method to your madness or do you dive right in? Thanks for reading! Paul https://www.diymotofix.com/  
    Posted by Paul Olesen on May 10, 2017

    Moose Racing Racing Heat Shield
    Love this product because it flat out works at shielding vulnerable materials from heat. It's easy to cut to shape, does a good job conforming to most bends & curves, and sticks to surfaces (including itself) very well.  I recently used it on the exhaust side turn signal, side panel, and fuel tank on my 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R because the stock exhaust catalytic converter gets so damn hot! There have been reports of melted plastics, so I figured that I'd give this a shot. So far so good... For details on this install project,  see the #dualsportduo blog 
    Posted by ThumperTalk on Feb 23, 2013

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