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What happens to the brain when a concussion happens?

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Coach Robb

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What happens to the brain when a concussion happens?
Inside your skull you have cerebrospinal fluid and of course your brain. A violent impact causes your brain to vibrate and sometimes even bump against the skull bone. If the force is too much, you end up with a concussion. Ironically, the trauma that occurs when the brain hits the skull, there is often no evidence of injury because the damage is on the inside, within the medical world it is known as the “Silent Injury” according to Dr. Lovell from the University of Pittsburgh’s medical center which researches concussions.

 

Once common mistake is assuming that because you didn’t get “knocked out”, then the hit to your head was minimal. In fact, if you experience vomiting, dilated pupils, loss of smell or taste you should visit with a neurologist immediately. Additional negative symptoms after a head impact are headaches, dizziness or memory loss lasting more than 5 day or delayed memory of easy questions (i.e. what did you eat for breakfast yesterday morning?).

 

4 Stages of a Concussion:
Impact to the head
The most common causes of concussions are falls, car accidents, impact sports and explosions. The trauma causes force to the head in two directions: linear (forwards and backwards) or rotational (side to side). These forces literally cause your brain to “slosh” within the cerebrospinal fluid and bump up against the skull.

 

Inflammation
Trauma to the brain can damage neurons, the cells that govern the flow of chemical messengers known as neurotransmitters. In the worst case scenario, those damaged neurons lose control of the neurotransmitters, allowing them to accelerate up to five (5x) their normal speed. The resulting chemical acceleration can cause memory loss, blurred vision, dizziness, headache and nausea.

 

Hibernation
Your brain’s cortex detects the neurotransmitter imbalance and tries to fix the neurons by calling for a surge of healing glucose. At the same time, calcium neurotransmitters start constricting the blood vessels, delaying glucose from reaching the neurons. Your brain function slows until blood flow returns to normal.

 

Recovery
Healing the neurons within your brain can take several weeks to within your brain. However, if you sustain another concussion during this period, you could suffer permanent damage and a lifetime of headaches and other adverse side effects.

 

Though it is hard for competitive athletes, but staying away from the potential of re-hitting your head, rest & proper nutrition will facilitate the recovery process.

 

Note: if you experience headaches after hitting your head, DO NOT consume aspirin or ibuprofen (this may increase your risk of brain bleeding); instead use acetaminophen.

 

Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard!
-Coach Robb
http://www.completeracingsolutions.com


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