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Getting Started Servicing Shocks

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Paul Olesen

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Hey everyone, this week we're going to switch it up and talk shock absorbers! Over the last few months I've gotten many requests to broaden the topic spectrum and cover other dirt bike topics. So today, we'll do just that by discussing and providing some resources to get you familiar with servicing shocks.

 

I suspect many of you currently take your shock to someone to have it serviced when it needs to be freshened up. I also bet that it is usually a pain to be without a bike for perhaps a week and that it probably costs around $100 each time? I know I always dreaded having suspension work done on my bike because it seemed to take forever, plus I always had to drive over an hour and half to the nearest shop. For me, those days are long gone. Now do all my suspension work myself.

 

I believe the majority of you are completely capable of servicing your shocks yourself, but just don't quite have all the pieces of the puzzle you need. Maybe you're not quite sure what tools you need; or once you get the shock apart, you don't know what parts you will have to replace? To help clarify what's needed to service a shock and answer some of the common questions about shock building, I created a detailed guide for you. The guide will help you decide if outsourcing your shock maintenance is the way to go or if you are in fact ready to take the job on yourself.

 

Before I discuss the details of the guide, I want to provide you with a little background on shock absorbers. For major motorcycle brands, shocks are sourced from the following companies: Showa, KYB , and Works Performance (WP). These three brands are primarily the companies responsible for equipping OEM bikes. Companies, such as Ohlins , cater more towards the aftermarket. Out of the three common OEM shock brand options, Showa and KYB are the go-to's for the Japanese manufacturers, while European brands, such as KTM, gravitate toward the WP brand. So if there is any question as to what brand of shock you have, you can keep this in mind. Out of the three common OEM brands, Showa and KYB shocks are very similar, while WPs feature a slightly different design.

 

The guide I created is geared towards those of you with either Showa or KYB shocks. Those of you with WP shocks may still find the guide useful, but there are a couple tools missing. Within the eight page guide, you'll be provided information on all the tools you need to service a Showa or KYB shock. These tools include any specialty tools and discuss shock pressurization options. Plus there are some pointers on how to make your own specialty tools if you are on a budget.

 

Once you get through the tools section you'll be presented with a detailed outline on replacement parts. Knowing what to replace within the shock when it is due for servicing is extremely important and the replacement parts section will walk you right through what you may need. It will also provide you with different options for buying replacement parts.

 

To receive the eight page guide and learn more about shock servicing, click the following link: Shock Building Tools and Replacement Parts Guide

 

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Thanks for reading and feel free to comment below with any questions or concerns. Bringing high quality DIY advice is what Moto Mind is all about, and I enjoy hearing from all of you and your DIY experiences.

 

-Paul Olesen
DIY Moto Fix


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It is now called the politically correct WP Performance.

Thanks for correcting me on WP. Apparently I had too many acronyms running through my head while I was writing. Sorry for the mix-up everyone.

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What a great guide, super helpful! Wish I would of had this guide weeks ago! Super helpful thing I found is buying parts from SDi. They seem to sell all the brands and wear parts individually, now I wont sound like such a novice knowing what is what!

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What a great guide, super helpful! Wish I would of had this guide weeks ago! Super helpful thing I found is buying parts from SDi. They seem to sell all the brands and wear parts individually, now I wont sound like such a novice knowing what is what!

Thanks for the tip on buying parts from SDi and I'm glad you've found the guide helpful!

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I was just about to buy the Video and Handbook that they try to sell, but the web site asks for you to accept "Preapproved Future Payments". No thanks. I'll not be giving my money to scam artists today. Nice try.

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I was just about to buy the Video and Handbook that they try to sell, but the web site asks for you to accept "Preapproved Future Payments". No thanks. I'll not be giving my money to scam artists today. Nice try.

Sorry you feel that we are scam artists. It would have been great if you would have messaged me directly to voice your concerns about the pre-approval process so I could have discussed it with you.

You are not the first to question the pre-approval thing with Paypal and I recently emailed a staff member at Gumroad (Gumroad is my shopping cart host) to get further information. Below is what they had to say:

 

Steve replied:

 

I apologize for your customer’s alarm. That messaging is put in place by PayPal, not us, and as a result it seems fairly scary.

But this is what the messaging means:

If your customer:

1. Chooses to create a Gumroad account after their purchase, and

2. Chooses to save their payment information in their Gumroad account (at www.gumroad.com/settings/buyer_information), and

3. Chooses to buy a product again on Gumroad, while logged in…

Then they would not have to login to PayPal again.

 

That’s it. Nothing devious or dastardly about it. It works the exact same was as when you buy a product on Amazon or Ebay. If you have an account on those platforms, you don’t have to enter your payment information every time. This is your everyday kind of online payment, it just has been presented in a very weird way by PayPal.

 

- Steve // Support@GR 

 

Hopefully this clears things up for you and assures you we are not "scam artists".

Regards,

Paul

 

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