over gripping the bars


24 replies to this topic
  • yz250337

Posted 18 September 2012 - 09:36 PM

#21

so to bring the topic back lol some people said a mix of overgrip and normal and others said normal i found the smallest amount of overgrip i can get away with is the best i went riding today and hit a couple rocks or braking bumps when the sun was in my eyes and only had the feeling of the bike getting away from me once i found the body position is the most importaint to my hand if im in the right posistion while breaking or accelerating as i have less weight on my hands

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • tye1138

Posted 18 September 2012 - 10:08 PM

#22

if im in the right posistion while breaking or accelerating as i have less weight on my hands


Yep, I completely agree. I don't get arm pump or any hand related fatigue because its all about keeping those hands loose and gripping onto the bike. ;)

  • tye1138

Posted 19 September 2012 - 12:47 PM

#23

I just wanna correct something I said yesterday which is false.

My trick of covering the brake lever when riding, is only related to entering corners and exiting corners. It obviously has no effect when riding flat out.

When I explained this yesterday, I evidently wasn't thinking straight and last night when I was riding home, I paid attention to the technique and noticed that it was only related to stopping and initial throttle input. When you whack the throttle open, your finger of course will come off the lever. But this is how I can keep the throttle open whilst braking.

I apologize for the confusion. I will shoot a video of this technique ASAP to pin it down and hopefully that will explain it more.

Edited by tye1138, 19 September 2012 - 12:48 PM.


  • Blutarsky

Posted 24 September 2012 - 03:17 PM

#24

This technique was taught to me by several ex-professional racers in both roadracing and motocross. Its highly used, especially on lightning switch 2 strokes. The point of covering the brake lever is to give your hand/body a reference at where the throttle position is at any given time so you can deliver smooth throttle control.


This is how I taught myself to use the throttle... After I got some instruction...I asked if this technique of using the finger on the brake as a referenc point...to smooth and control throttle was OK...I was told yes...absolutely...lots of pros do that.... So it was good to learn that something I started doing on my own was a valid technique. Because of this...I always ride with a finger on the brake. It is my throttle control anchor...and I know where I am...by how far my finger has slid around the brake lever... I have never had an issue with this causing me to accidentally hit the brake... When I open the throttle all the way...my finger is still barely on the lever....

As for position do not forget to keep your elbows OUT. You should develope callouses on the OUTSIDE of your hands...along the 'pinky' metacarpal bone surface... If you over gripa little...but do not have your elbows out...all sorts things happen...few of them good. Also....if you overgrip much...you are going to continuously be re-gripping...because there are certain instances you can not be overgripped at all...

Edited by Blutarsky, 24 September 2012 - 03:26 PM.


  • ajcjr

Posted 01 October 2012 - 01:24 PM

#25

i just posted another thread on holding on, i feel i am way over gripping the bars because when i hit bumps the throttle turns on. I hold really tight with my knees but feel the need to hold onto the bars, any suggestions to help me.

thanks





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

Register Close
If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.