Is there too much POWER for a beginner?



27 replies to this topic
  • jchantzWR400F

Posted November 14, 2003 - 11:16 AM

#21

I agree with oldbones. Sometimes it's best to start out on something a little more tame like a 250 4-stroker if you're doing the following riding: rocky/muddy conditions, hill climbs, tight-single track, thick woods and trails, etc. They are certainly easier to pickup after dropping. They are easier to throw around=less tired at the end of the day. To address your stated conditions, open roads, sandy beaches, I think you could easily handle the 400's and larger. Just be aware that a properly tuned 400 or larger 4-stroke when gassed in the first 3 gears will turn-over backwars.

  • hangman

Posted November 14, 2003 - 03:36 PM

#22

Dude, I say no such thing... I have been riding for 6 months. I'm 32 and I have only been riding for six months. The first bike i ever owned is my 03 YZ450. I wreck my bike every time I go out. I'm not dead yet thanks to my 450. My wrecks were due to inexperience. If it wern't for the power, I think I'd be seriously hurt in some of those wrecks. The first thing my friends taught me when I started riding was "When in doubt....hold on tight and give your right hand a good twist..." The thing about a "beginner" is...were always in "doubt".... good luck :)

  • trailmix

Posted November 14, 2003 - 03:48 PM

#23

If you're a little guy this bike would be a bit much, however.. when it come to sand and a two wheel motorcycle, the 400 will take you where you want to go. If You know this is a sport that you a going to stick with.. get the bigger bike. It Will save you money in the run.

  • lipskid

Posted November 14, 2003 - 05:52 PM

#24

I agree with Dan and OldBones. When you're first learning, less is more. You will learn faster wringing out a smaller bike, than being intimidated by to much power. Putting the corks back in as posted above would be a good compromise. It's still a tall bike though. If you can't get both feet on the ground while sitting on the bike, you might look for something smaller. Just my .02.

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  • rohar

Posted November 14, 2003 - 07:01 PM

#25

To answer the general question: Yes. absolutely there is such a thing as too much power for a beginner. The classic mistake is to grab a handful of throttle when panicked; thus looping out and not having much fun. That said, it depends on the beginner.

You are not a beginning motorcycle rider, so I think the WR400 will work. Just go easy at first. :D I came off a long, as in years, hiatus from dirtbiking and went straight to the WR450. I haven't had any issues related to handling the power. The power band is well behaved so if you go easy, you'll be fine. :)

  • Dez113

Posted November 14, 2003 - 07:09 PM

#26

Dude, I say no such thing... I have been riding for 6 months. I'm 32 and I have only been riding for six months. The first bike i ever owned is my 03 YZ450. I wreck my bike every time I go out. I'm not dead yet thanks to my 450. My wrecks were due to inexperience. If it wern't for the power, I think I'd be seriously hurt in some of those wrecks. The first thing my friends taught me when I started riding was "When in doubt....hold on tight and give your right hand a good twist..." The thing about a "beginner" is...were always in "doubt".... good luck :)


How long again have you been riding?

  • Math

Posted November 15, 2003 - 09:45 PM

#27

Dude, I say no such thing... I have been riding for 6 months. I'm 32 and I have only been riding for six months. The first bike i ever owned is my 03 YZ450. I wreck my bike every time I go out. I'm not dead yet thanks to my 450. My wrecks were due to inexperience. If it wern't for the power, I think I'd be seriously hurt in some of those wrecks. The first thing my friends taught me when I started riding was "When in doubt....hold on tight and give your right hand a good twist..."



:) Hmmm , I'm sorry but I don't agree at all.

I feel more like Oldbones saying that you need to built your self confidence...and learn the basics.

How could you be cautious if you have no experience about what situation could cause a serious accident or injuries? :D Be smart and think you may have years to ride :D. Put the chances on your side to make it become a years-lasting love story. :D

When you meet a nice woman you can either go for the one night stand or take it step by step and build for life. That is the same for motorcycling. :D

  • MXOldtimer

Posted November 16, 2003 - 10:50 PM

#28

I'm looking around for a first dirt bike to ride on beaches and some roads to get there. I haven't ridden a lot on dirt bikes, but have ridden a bit on the road. Is there too much power for me in a WR400F? Should I get an old 250? :)

Since you know how to ride a motorcycle I'll say this.
If your only going to ride on beaches & fire roads more open spaces than the 400 would be great, there's nothing better than to get on a open beach or straight desert and having the power go. The WR-400 even being FAST are still very controllable. If you plan on riding more technical spaces such as trees, rocks & roots by all means go with a 250. If you plan on racing and being a beginner, don't get the big bore. Beginners spend more time fighting the power of a big bore than racing it. But if you plan on staying out in open areas you'll have more fun playing with the big bore and your on the right track with a WRF rather than a YZF.
Don't forget that 400 will be a bear to start, have a auto decomp e-cam put in for the ease of starting if you get one.




 
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