GPS do you


26 replies to this topic
  • allterra

Posted September 04, 2012 - 06:29 PM

#1

As i am starting to head deeper into unknown territory I am thinking that it is worth getting a GPS to find a way in and out without going in circles and running out of gas. The question is what makes styles and options are suited for mounting on the bike. What do you use.

  • MANIAC998

Posted September 04, 2012 - 07:32 PM

#2

I'm running a Garmin Rino 530. I do like that new one that is specifically made for dirtbikes though, Trailtech Voyager. Planning some trips?
Maniac

  • Alpha One Nine

Posted September 04, 2012 - 09:42 PM

#3

I have a Garmin Nuvi 550 and I like it. I have had it for about 3 years and I'm not sure if it's still a current model. At the time it was their entry level "motorcycle friendly” device meaning its waterproof and “ruggedized”. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles the Zumo series Garmins have but does provide good basic navigation. I move it between three bikes and two cages.

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On the WR450


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On the KLR650


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On the ZG1000

  • AKmud

Posted September 04, 2012 - 10:35 PM

#4

I'm running a Garmin map 76CSx mounted on a ram mount. It has taken many tumbles with me and is still going strong.

  • bmeador

Posted September 05, 2012 - 03:09 AM

#5

I have the Garmin 60Csx on a ram mount, it is very rugged and a user friendly gps.

  • allterra

Posted September 05, 2012 - 03:15 AM

#6

I'm running a Garmin Rino 530. I do like that new one that is specifically made for dirtbikes though, Trailtech Voyager. Planning some trips?
Maniac


no special trip. I am just getting deeper in to the woods and some places without trails. I don't want to have to pay attention to where I am and going. I just want to explore and then when it is time have it guide me to the nearest road or way back so I don't have to guess and hope I have enough fuel. That being said I THINK what I want is a large screen. (so I don't have to stop to read it.) Rugged. Good topo maps so I don't endup at an impassable river or cliff. I don't think I need much as far as street maps I think they will show enough on the topo map. Any and all input is welcome.

I have a Garmin Nuvi 550 and I like it. I have had it for about 3 years and I'm not sure if it's still a current model. At the time it was their entry level "motorcycle friendly” device meaning its waterproof and “ruggedized”. It doesn’t have all the bells and whistles the Zumo series Garmins have but does provide good basic navigation. I move it between three bikes and two cages.

Posted Image
On the WR450


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On the KLR650


Posted Image
On the ZG1000


I like the looks of that but will it support topo maps? The nuvi i used for work a few years ago did not have the ability to load topo maps.

  • Alpha One Nine

Posted September 05, 2012 - 06:29 AM

#7

I like the looks of that but will it support topo maps? The nuvi i used for work a few years ago did not have the ability to load topo maps.


[color=#222222][color=#222222]Yes I have the 24K topo (routable) on the micro SD card. The map it came with is City Navigator North America NT. The Nuvi 500 is the identical unit expect for the map sets. The 500 has street and topo maps of just the continental US. A buddy of mine has that one and he really likes it except that it won't load external track files. This is a limitation of both. Not a big deal for me.[/color][/color]

  • YamaLink

Posted September 05, 2012 - 10:52 AM

#8

I'm interested in the new Garmin Fenix watch, but it's so new and just barely coming out. The marketing PR bs mentioned "great for backcountry motorcycling" so we'll see.

  • Rocky739

Posted September 05, 2012 - 01:40 PM

#9

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I've been looking at this Garmin model and poking around advrider.com trying to figure out what model will do all I need without any bells and whistles..

Is anyone using the etrex 20 or one of its cousins? I want to be able to upload GPX files to a unit and follow the route nothing fancy.

  • Stealth13

Posted September 05, 2012 - 09:21 PM

#10

I wouldn't mind one of these. The worst is when you're far out and get down a nasty hill and can't get back up :/

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  • OUTERLIMITS

Posted September 06, 2012 - 07:14 AM

#11

I have the Garmin 60Csx on a ram mount, it is very rugged and a user friendly gps.


+1, same here. This will also likely be the most common one you will find on the trail, which sometimes helps when you forget how to do a particular function on it, although it is pretty simple to use. I have hit the deck in baja around 45 mph and no problem with the ram mount, it will just move out of the way if contact is made. No matter what you get, be sure to hardwire it into the bike's power. Running it off the batteries is not a good long term solution as they tend to bounce around inside the battery compartment and cause some arcing at the contact points, eventually to the point wihere the contacts will get "burned" and no longer work.

  • GCannon

Posted September 06, 2012 - 08:20 AM

#12

I use the Garmin 62 S http://www8.garmin.c...wnersManual.pdf
I have some issues with this unit like it is hard to see the screen with dusty googles on but you need to get a Garmin if you want to do any file sharing with your buddies.
The ram mount is excellent and cheap. I have mine hard wire into the WR and nothing is cooler than riding at night with the backlight on all the time. However I have been using Lithium batteries when I run the GPS on my YZ 250 and one set of batteries will work awesome for an entire weekend so don't let the battery thing scare you, The lithium batteries are amazing!
The Bluetooth file sharing with another GPS is also very cool. The biggest Geek in your group can ZAP everyone's GPS before or after a ride to share all the info.
One thing I do when I get a new GPS is cover the screen with clear packing tape and trim the edges with a razor blade. it protects the screen in a crash. when it starts looking bad I just remove it and put on new tape its not a perfect protector but is a good way to do a screen tune up every so often. You really need good PC skills if you want to get the most out of your GPS and making and saving maps
Those NUvi's look really cool but seem too big to use for extreme technical riding. My unit in the ram mount is constantly hitting my chest protector on steep uphills and standing wheelie situations.
Mapping software is a whole issue onto its self.

  • Spiritwalker2222

Posted September 06, 2012 - 08:27 AM

#13

+1 on the Garmin 62s. I get about 2 full days of riding if you turn the backlight off when your not using it(unit does it automatically) with regular alkaline batteries.

  • Rocky739

Posted September 08, 2012 - 07:32 AM

#14

What features do you have on the more expensive 62s models that you couldn't live without?

The main thing I was worried about was no compass feature. I do carry a real compass plus a map and basic boy scout orienteering skills and have never needed the compass so I can't imagine not being able to live without a gps one..

I would have to have a pretty good arguement to justify a 500.00 dollar unit over a 199.00 one to the bookkeeper.

The only difference I can see is the compass and bluetooth data sharing (useless as I would be the only one with a unit). Am I missing anything?


https://buy.garmin.c...reProduct=87771

  • DeepPurplishBlue

Posted September 08, 2012 - 08:31 AM

#15

What features do you have on the more expensive 62s models that you couldn't live without?

The main thing I was worried about was no compass feature. I do carry a real compass plus a map and basic boy scout orienteering skills and have never needed the compass so I can't imagine not being able to live without a gps one..

I would have to have a pretty good arguement to justify a 500.00 dollar unit over a 199.00 one to the bookkeeper.

The only difference I can see is the compass and bluetooth data sharing (useless as I would be the only one with a unit). Am I missing anything?


https://buy.garmin.c...reProduct=87771



That 62s is nice, but why does it cost so much?

At that price point take a look at the Montana 650. Twice the internal memory, twice the screen resolution, overall a much better unit for roughly the same investment. ($499 at GPScity with free shipping)

Concerning your justifying a high dollar unit over a cheaper one, I used to be in the same boat. I have used a Garmin GPS V for about the last 10 years. My first one cost $440 but lately I get spares from ebay for about $50. But when I saw the Montana 650 and how it is weatherproof and accepts satellite photos as well as scans of paper maps I made the switch.

Any GPS from the cheapest one on up will do the most basic task everyone requires of a GPS: navigation. But for me at least, the features of the Montana 650 sold me on finally going with more bells and whistles in my GPS.

  • Rocky739

Posted September 08, 2012 - 10:57 AM

#16

That 62s is nice, but why does it cost so much?

At that price point take a look at the Montana 650. Twice the internal memory, twice the screen resolution, overall a much better unit for roughly the same investment. ($499 at GPScity with free shipping)

Concerning your justifying a high dollar unit over a cheaper one, I used to be in the same boat. I have used a Garmin GPS V for about the last 10 years. My first one cost $440 but lately I get spares from ebay for about $50. But when I saw the Montana 650 and how it is weatherproof and accepts satellite photos as well as scans of paper maps I made the switch.

Any GPS from the cheapest one on up will do the most basic task everyone requires of a GPS: navigation. But for me at least, the features of the Montana 650 sold me on finally going with more bells and whistles in my GPS.


Thanks!!

I still think I will go with the etrex, at least as a gateway GPS. My riding buddy can get it through Wal-Hell (his wife is a manager) for 160.00 bucks so at that price if I decide to upgrade I can punt it on ebay and not come out too bad.
Guess I will need to squeeze another gadget on my bars..

  • allterra

Posted September 08, 2012 - 02:13 PM

#17

it is because of threads like this that I love ths forum. Simple straight forward answers from people who have actualy used the equipt. If a fellow rider says he can use the same thing for 10 yearsthat says reliablity. It is very nice to have the opinions of those who do and not just the sales and marketing hype. I still have not made up my mind but you all have narrowed it down.

Thanks to all who have and will express themselves on this topic.

  • Spiritwalker2222

Posted September 10, 2012 - 06:38 AM

#18

What features do you have on the more expensive 62s models that you couldn't live without?

The main thing I was worried about was no compass feature. I do carry a real compass plus a map and basic boy scout orienteering skills and have never needed the compass so I can't imagine not being able to live without a gps one..

I would have to have a pretty good arguement to justify a 500.00 dollar unit over a 199.00 one to the bookkeeper.

The only difference I can see is the compass and bluetooth data sharing (useless as I would be the only one with a unit). Am I missing anything?


https://buy.garmin.c...reProduct=87771


The biggest difference between the cheaper and more expexsive gps's is the number of track points per track you can have. The cheaper ones are limited to 500 while the better ones allow for 10,000 points per track. My friend has a cheap one and it's pretty useless.


edit, I don't know why it costs so much more. You would think that the track point limit is either caused intentionally to differentiate their products or due to a chip limitation that probably only costs a few bucks.

Edited by Spiritwalker2222, September 10, 2012 - 06:41 AM.


  • DeepPurplishBlue

Posted September 10, 2012 - 10:44 AM

#19

The biggest difference between the cheaper and more expexsive gps's is the number of track points per track you can have. The cheaper ones are limited to 500 while the better ones allow for 10,000 points per track. My friend has a cheap one and it's pretty useless.


edit, I don't know why it costs so much more. You would think that the track point limit is either caused intentionally to differentiate their products or due to a chip limitation that probably only costs a few bucks.


Track points is the most critical feature for me in a GPS that will be used on offroad trips. My 10 year old Garmin GPS V saves 3000 track points, and you can archive 10 tracks. I have not seen any units that only save 500 points but if I ever encountered one it would go right in the trash or on ebay. That is absolutely useless.

The newer ones save 10,000 points, which if you configure the track log at the best compromise of detail versus memory use 0.02 miles per point (105 feet) you get right around 200 miles from a track. The newer ones also will allow you to archive the tracks to SD cards so you have a virtually unlimited storage for tracks. However, I do not know why the active track is still limited to only 10,000 points when memory is so cheap these days. I suspect it could be a processing power thing since it needs to deal with all of those points in memory while updating the track.

As an additional data point, the Trailtech Voyageris popular on offroad bikes and can save in the neighborhood of 140,000 points for the active track, but the downside is it does not have any map loading abilities.

  • Spiritwalker2222

Posted September 11, 2012 - 06:26 AM

#20

The 500 limit is very common for displying old(saved) tracks on the display. The etrax can only show 500 track points for previous tracks, but can display more for the current track.

The way I use my gps is go to a riding area, turn on the track I have of that area, and now I can see all the trails in the area, plus my current breadcrumb trail.




 
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