Help Needed With Log Crossing Technique


105 replies to this topic
  • Mr. Neutron

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:33 PM

#1

Hey All!!

I finally worked up the nerve to try getting over my maple log I intentionally left in my yard. I'd say it's approximately 2 ft. in diameter. I can't seem to get over it without banging my skid plate on it. I think that I'm not understanding how to "jump" the rear wheel up on the second blip, even after watching Ryan Young & Jordi Pascuet explain things.

Anyway, I'm going to try & embed a short video of myself going over my yard obstacle in a very ugly fashion. If anyone has any tips on how to get over this correctly, and w/o using the skid plate, I'd really like to hear them! I'm kinda dense as far as figuring out technique most of the time, so any help/criticism would be appreciated.

http://youtu.be/hdwS16zplhM

Thanks!
Jimmie

Edited by Mr. Neutron, June 03, 2012 - 05:35 PM.


  • Stroupdog

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:57 PM

#2

Looks good to my beginner eyes, just like I do it unless I get lucky and wheelie all the way over it. Watch out, your yard is going to start looking like mine: tires, logs, culverts, pallets, refrigerators, bathtubs....

Some of the oldtimers will be along shortly and tell you all about the correct riding position, body geometry, and riding boots. :cry:

Edited by Stroupdog, June 03, 2012 - 06:03 PM.


  • Mr. Neutron

Posted June 03, 2012 - 07:10 PM

#3

Looks good to my beginner eyes, just like I do it unless I get lucky and wheelie all the way over it. Watch out, your yard is going to start looking like mine: tires, logs, culverts, pallets, refrigerators, bathtubs....

Some of the oldtimers will be along shortly and tell you all about the correct riding position, body geometry, and riding boots. :cry:


Thanks, Stroup!!

Well, I'm pretty certiain I'm not supposed to be hammering the skid plate like I do. I'm bettin' I'm really blowing it on the "spring upward" part of what I've read & seen about Double Blips on the Trials Training Center website. And heck, maybe that's not even the correct thing to attempt to do on this particular obstacle...... :cry: Speaking of the homemade obstacles like you did above, I do have a couple of minor things in another part of my yard. One is a small simple ramp, more or less shaped like a tent, that's only about 14"-16" high. After she saw that, my wife asked me if I had built a shelter for Garden Gnomes...... :ride:

I figure I'll take a little bit of a hit on my Danner boots. :p But ya know what? They work out really good, actually. Waaaayyy better than my mx boots do, for certain. I had dreams of getting a new trials helmet, boots, and stuff, but those dreams got derailed when our furnace in our house quit working. :lol: Once I get that pesky (and expensive) thing replaced, I can hopefully go back to looking at boots & helmets. Funny how right after ya buy a new bike, something on your house that costs almost the same amount of money as your bike just did, will break...... :lol:

Stroup, I hope I see ya next Sunday at Hog Hollow! I'll have the weird colored '97 Ford F350 Crew Cab diesel, pulling an old white w/brown striped Fruehauf trailer. I'll be the Sea Cow in weird gear & Danner boots, on a Gas Gas. And probably will have a lot of number "5"s on my card.... :p

Jimmie

Edited by Mr. Neutron, June 03, 2012 - 07:14 PM.


  • andrzej

Posted June 03, 2012 - 07:29 PM

#4

Looks to me like you're just skimming the front wheel over the top of the log, and so not getting any compression on the front forks, which is what is probably causing your skid plate to hit. You're likely wheelying just a bit too high.

You need to drive the front wheel into the log, 2/3 of the way up the log, so that the front shocks compress. As they rebound, if you hit the 2nd blip, it will cause the back wheel to follow up and over, and will clear the skid plate that way.

Try it from the other side of the log, which seems to have a steeper "face" than the side in the video. That will make it easier to drive the front wheel in properly.

I have a log on my property a bit bigger than the one you are playing on. If I drive the front wheel in, my skid plate never touches. The only time I have it touch is when I deliberately try to get the bike up and balance on the plate on the log, then lean forward till the rear wheel grabs and finish the crossing. Useful to do it that way if you don't have a clear run on the far side.

  • 762SPR

Posted June 04, 2012 - 02:32 AM

#5

Looks to me like you're just skimming the front wheel over the top of the log, and so not getting any compression on the front forks, which is what is probably causing your skid plate to hit. You're likely wheelying just a bit too high.

You need to drive the front wheel into the log, 2/3 of the way up the log, so that the front shocks compress. As they rebound, if you hit the 2nd blip, it will cause the back wheel to follow up and over, and will clear the skid plate that way.

Try it from the other side of the log, which seems to have a steeper "face" than the side in the video. That will make it easier to drive the front wheel in properly.

I have a log on my property a bit bigger than the one you are playing on. If I drive the front wheel in, my skid plate never touches. The only time I have it touch is when I deliberately try to get the bike up and balance on the plate on the log, then lean forward till the rear wheel grabs and finish the crossing. Useful to do it that way if you don't have a clear run on the far side.


I was going to say the exact same thing!

Try going at it from the other side. It seems like it will be harder but it is actually easier. And don't worry too much about not wheelieing and smacking straight into it... I've done that and it ain't too bad! :cry:

At first it seems like everything is happening way too fast, but with a little practice it slows down. What helped me was to really focus on DROPPING the front wheel onto the log. You don't want to skim it as the front wheel lifts, you want to smack it. Start the wheelie a little farther back and try hitting the log at about the 3/4 mark as it comes down. Then as the wheel impacts and loads the front, you want to jump INTO the handle bars. Not just straight up, INTO the bars and push them forward. This will bring your rear end right up and the back wheel should just float over. I believe the second blip happens just before/as you jump. For smaller logs it isn't even all that necessary, at least wasn't for me when I got a good front impact and a good strong jump... that and I wasn't really coordinated most of the time to do the second blip.

I hope that's all correct... I may have some of the timing messed up because I haven't done any proper trials practice in a while. I usually ride trails when I'm on the trial bike and get caught up in the fast stuff without spending the time I should on the slow stuff.

Some of the experts on here have some really good advice and I'm sure they'll be along shortly to help out. In the mean time you can look up my double blip thread from the end of last summer to see how a REAL noob does it! :cry: There is some really good advice in there.

  • 2PLY

Posted June 04, 2012 - 06:36 AM

#6

On a log that small AND approaching it on the sloped face side, there's no problem with "skimming" the log. It's not really big enough to require the front tire impact. Approaching from the other direction would be a better test.

The glaring problem I see is no attempt to unweight the rear tire... no body jump.. you are just riding with all weight on the pegs until the rear tire hits the log.. You may be expecting the power alone to do the job... The power "Blips" must be accompanied by strong body input too. In fact, it's MORE body than power.. A couple videos I've made that cover this:

This first one shows how important the "Body" part of the jump is.. Here is TT "Frostbite" attempting his very first log jump... Also doing what you are doing but on a larger log.. But then, 5 minutes later he's got the idea and later perfects the move WITHOUT any power. Pay close attention to the body jump part of the ride:


Another.. similar results to your ride, but he lifts the front even higher... again, full weight on the pegs at the moment of rear tire impact.



And another example.... same problem.. But note that on this smaller log AND because of the acute angle of the jump, I'm NOT banging the front tire into the log... just skimming it or marking it with the front tire.. BUT, I'm NOT allowing my front tire to climb skyward any higher than the top of the log.. On one of the jumps, I DO impact the log a little after I proved it was not slippery,
https://vimeo.com/4994239

Edited by 2PLY, June 04, 2012 - 06:42 AM.


  • 2PLY

Posted June 04, 2012 - 09:05 AM

#7

I might add, that in the thread from Stroupdog called: "First time on a trials bike" I posted the stick-figure photo showing where the weight SHOULD have been and in that, I drew a vertical line through the foot pegs to show where he SHOULD have been.. Well, pausing your video and drawing a vertical line through your pegs shows you BEHIND that line throughout the entire jump.

From behind that line, it's almost impossible to jump with your body as you will be busy hanging on to the bars to keep attached to the bike.. You need to get back over the pegs before the rear tire gets to the log so that you can JUMP off of the pegs to compress that rear and work with the rebound of the suspension. We use the bike as a diving platform for the rider. You literally DIVE head first over the log and then when your arms will not stretch any more, you suck up your legs and with your hands, you first pull the bars up and then shove them out in front for the landing... You "Trade Positions" with the bike. First YOU jump and then you give it ALL back to the bike.

Another more extreme example of the double-blip.. watch closely for the details and watch how much body work he puts into it!!


  • laser17

Posted June 04, 2012 - 12:37 PM

#8

As usual - great Video and Advice !

  • Gandalf_WR450

Posted June 04, 2012 - 01:34 PM

#9

Sir Neutron,
I recognize some of the same problems that I had from your video. Being a 'lesser' rider than these
talented folks, maybe what I found will help.

1) slow down while you are learning these manuevers- I was approaching too fast and once I slowed down I began to break the timing into loading front, lifting and placing front, loading rear and timing jump with front impact. Slowing down gives you more time to pick apart these movements.

2) study the suspension in these great videos- I could not isolate the different parts by watching good rider's body movements until I paid attention to the compression of suspension- front and rear. Somehow that helped me break apart the steps involved- a no brainer to the more seasoned trials rider, but once I watched the suspension in 2-Ply's video's (thats where the slow motion really helps) then I knew what the rider was doing. Once I broke it down into steps, I quit smashing my rear wheel into the log and began to be more comfortable. Watch the front compress in these videos and then watch how it compresses in your video.

3) when you dont make it over, try to balance with your wheel on the top of the object, weight the rear for traction and practice jumping forward- this really teaches me what works without the inertia and realy gives me a heck of a workout!

Have Fun!
Doug

  • Stroupdog

Posted June 04, 2012 - 04:17 PM

#10

Yea, good vids 2-ply! Makes sense, I'm going out to practice now...... lookie what I found....Don't worry I pushed it over and filled the center. Gotta love Craigslist free section!

Posted Image

I'll be at hog hollow this Sunday, I'll be in a white Dodge Ram 3500 quad cab. Look forward to meeting you Jimmy!

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted June 04, 2012 - 05:39 PM

#11

Wow, Incredible Help & Advice, From All!!! :cry: :cry: Many Thanks!!!

Andrzej, and 762SPR,

Good catch & call on the front wheel of my bike just skimming the sloped portion of that log. Thanks for pointing that out; it's much appreciated! Either hitting it slightly lower (from the side I went up in the video), or going to the more round oppoosite side should help compress those forks. Mine weren't really even compressing at all! What a goober I've been! And 762SPR, I got a huge chuckle outta your comment about about

"And don't worry too much about not wheelieing and smacking straight into it... I've done that and it ain't too bad! :p"

It had me cracking up! [color=#011a4d] :lol:[/color] I actually got to see a a guy at a Poker Run years ago launch himself over a log (w/o his bike!) doing just that. He did the "unweighting thing" to the max, hee hee....

2PLY & Gandalf, You guys really Rock!!!

I've pretty much realized that I haven't had a clue about the "unweighting the rear wheel thing". :lol: I just hope that I can figure out how to do that.....

Gandalf, Excellent advice, sir! My embarassing thing that I have to admit to was that I already thought I was going slow! :ride: But you made some very valid points, and my next practice ride, I'm plan on trying everyone's advice! (we have thundershowers & lightning now; it's a "no-ride" afternoon...)

2PLY, Thanks, Man! All your written advice, and that last video (the one with Robert Schwenke; hope I spelled his name right) with the correctly progressing technique & slow mo helped a bunch. Side note: My wife really liked that music in that vid-who dunnit??? (In EDIT: I found it in the text at the bottom of your vid, 2PLY!)

Okay, the inevitable questions:

1. When you unload the weight off the rear wheel, you're pulling up on the bars also?

2. Are the feet supposed to come off the pegs?

3. Is this motion/movement similar to how Ryan Young teaches the Bunny Hop in his dvd? I ask this because I've been scratchin' my head trying to figure out a way to practice this without actually going over a log. Or......

4. In the first video, is Tim purposely stuck on the log? Is that how he learned the way to unweight the rear wheel? Is this what you're describing, Gandalf?)

5. The motion is every bit as much forward as upward? (okay, I did some re-reading, and 762SPR pretty much answered this in his post. 2PLY did also....)

Stroup, I look forward to seein' ya Sunday! You got that big tire for free? How heavy is that thing?

Again, thanks for your patience with all of us Trials Newbies, and especially for your answers & help!

Jimmie

Edited by Mr. Neutron, June 04, 2012 - 06:06 PM.


  • 762SPR

Posted June 04, 2012 - 09:45 PM

#12

Now that you mention it, I remember some drills that really helped me.

Yes, slowing down more really helps with timing. I too was having trouble with going too fast, even idle in 1st/2nd was too fast. You can try lowering idle, using brakes or using clutch to slow down.

Practice bunny hops! These are a really good exercise for getting small front wheel lifts combined with working the timing of the suspension. You will be unweighting the rear tire and it's close to the the same motion. Plus they're fun and cool and just one more thing in your tool chest!

Another thing you can do on flat ground is do a small wheel lift, then when the front hits and starts to rebound, give the second blip and jump forward... It feels kind of funky but it helped me with the timing... I also talked to my self so I wouldn't forget steps :cry:

Coming up off the pegs isn't required, but it shows that he is REALLY jumping into it. Gotta be careful though, if you jump off the bike like that but don't clear the log with the back tire... Well, I've done it and the bike stopped and let's just say me, and "the boys", are glad there wasn't a seat! :cry:

Another really good drill is when you don't clear the log and you're stuck on the skid plate on the log. Work it back a little so the log is stuck in between the skid plate and the front tire. Then slowly (or fast, if you can) lower your self back so your butt is about on the rear fender. Then "explode" forward with your hips going towards the bars and push forward with your arms. Let out the clutch and give it some gas and you should be able to ride over the log like a boss instead of having to drag your bike off of it. If the first attempt doesn't work, try it again until you get it! It's kind of a hard movement to explain, but once you get it it's pretty easy, you'll know when you do it right. At first it really wasn't working for me, but then all the sudden it clicked and was easy. It's sort of like you're snapping your hips forward like cracking a whip.

  • 2PLY

Posted June 05, 2012 - 08:22 AM

#13

Wow, Incredible Help & Advice, From All!!! :cry: :cry: Many Thanks!!!

......
Okay, the inevitable questions:

1. When you unload the weight off the rear wheel, you're pulling up on the bars also?


Yes, and a lot more!!! Whatever it takes to shove the bars out ahead for the landing.. Your hands will got from almost at your pockets or thighs, to way out above your head as if you were reaching for the ceiling if you compare them "Relative to your body" Watch the Robert Schwenke Advanced Double-Blip video again and note that... Of course, the degree to which your hands will change position is directly proportional to how big the object is that you are jumping.



If you are a Vimeo Registered user (either a free or paid member), you are allowed to download any video that is not "protected". Look at the lower right on the video web page. NONE of my instructional videos are protected and I encourage you to download them so that you can study them in detail any way you want. Watch them over an over and pause them at key moments. Take time to watch for any ONE specific point like knees or hands or suspension compression over and over and then look at something else. The jump is a combination of many fundamentals coming together in a blaze of action that is easy to miss.

On this particular jump video, note where Robert's hands are and how far they change position through the jump.. Another thing to watch using the pause function, is the relative position of his knees, hands, waist and butt to the bike. How far are they moving relative to the bike? Where are they at the start, middle and finish of the jump? For example: At the approach, he's centered over the bike and then he shoves his waist or middle torso back to over the rear tire.. He then pulls himself back over the pegs as he lifts the front of the bike at the same time in a "scissors action"... watch his waist end up almost into the steering stem and at that point, he gives all of his body momentum or inertia BACK to the bike and his butt ends up WAY BACK and over the tip of the fender as he stretches out to land the front tire... In other words, he winds up by shoving his torso back and then reverses that movement by pulling the bike up as he pulls himself into the fully extended upright position during the jump... And then quickly reverses it.. Imagine scissors in action... open and close... apart, closed and apart again. Action / reaction. Notice at the apex point of his body part of the jump where his butt is relative to the background.. It quickly gets to that apex but then pauses close to that position while the bike goes from front tire high to on the ground again in a rock-over-the-top motion as he extends his arms and sucks up his feet.

Another way to understand the mechanics of this jump is that Robert is using body inertia to affect the bike as he uses the bike for a "personal diving platform". He starts centered over it, shoves his body back which drives the front suspension down for the wind up... he then pulls himself back toward the centered position as the bike front lifts and executes a diving body jump... This action compresses the rear suspension to the maximum and the front tire impact on the log compresses the front suspension at the same time so that when it's time to launch the rear tire off the ground, he is fully extended and at the peak of his own jump so that everything unloads at the same time.... At this point, his body is as high and as far forward as the diving jump will allow... This is where he gives all of that body inertia or momentum back to the bike to help the bike unload and move forward. You use this forward push of the bike to help press the rear tire into the log so that it "sticks" and doesn't bounce back. You "pivot" over the log using the rear tire and never the skid plate. This sets the front tire out there away from the log for a less acute landing angle.

Difficult to write about... so pick the video apart, don't just watch the "neat jump"


2. Are the feet supposed to come off the pegs?


No. Though they might come off. This is one time where some people clamp their boots to the frame to help with the lift, though it's important to have the boots back to 1 inch or so away from the frame when you land.. A good trick if you can manage it.

3. Is this motion/movement similar to how Ryan Young teaches the Bunny Hop in his dvd? I ask this because I've been scratchin' my head trying to figure out a way to practice this without actually going over a log. Or......


Simple answer: Yes similar, but the Bunny Hop doesn't receive any help from objects.. There are a couple other little things going on in a Bunny Hop that might take me longer to explain than the "novel" above.. :ride:


4. In the first video, is Tim purposely stuck on the log? Is that how he learned the way to unweight the rear wheel? Is this what you're describing, Gandalf?)


Yes, This was to drive home the fact that the jump is mostly body work. Many people rely too much on engine power. In this case, resting the skid plate on the log is much more difficult because you lose the help of the front and rear suspension... But it drives home the lesson.. If you can balance well enough to keep the skid plate out of this exercise, using the suspension rebound really helps.


5. The motion is every bit as much forward as upward? (okay, I did some re-reading, and 762SPR pretty much answered this in his post. 2PLY did also....)


More forward than up. Use the suspension as a spring to get the up motion started and then shove the bike over with body work.. This is why if you are behind that imaginary center line through the pegs, you will not be able to help the bike.



Jimmie


Edited by 2PLY, June 05, 2012 - 08:27 AM.


  • 2PLY

Posted June 06, 2012 - 11:15 AM

#14

I would also visit the Trials Training Center Web page in the How to Ride section and read about the Double Blip. They explain what I've been saying in a similar way but sometimes a slightly different wording can make things more clear.. As in their definition of the jump and it's purpose:

".....The double blip is used to go over a modest sized obstacle with a minimum of speed and a maximum of control. This technique is very useful for moderate sized ledges or logs in which there is another turn immediately after and so you need to be at slow speed or stopped after the obstacle."

See the rest of the instructions, photos and videos at this page:
http://trialstrainin...ls/double-blip/

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted June 06, 2012 - 03:11 PM

#15

Thanks, 2PLY!!!

Sigh..... :lol: Sadly, in an effort to try & figure this out, I've been to Trials Training Center's most excellent website, along with many others. I've watched numerous dvds, & vimeo/youtube vids, and still haven't gotten it down yet..... :p

Once every so often today, either over my log, or on my Garden Gnome A-Frame that I built, I think I may have done something right, and gotten a little bit of rear wheel lift. Maybe even at the right time! :lol: With me, ya have to think "Baby Steps"...... Anyway, it felt much smoother, and didn't seem to need much throttle when I did what I perceived as "right". Sometimes, the skid plate wouldn't hit. Tough to tell without some video, really. I either need someone to run the little video camera, or find our tripod. My wife was busy with her t-shirt printing work, so she couldn't be pressed into video duty.....

Anyway, I have been trying to practice the advice & help I've gotten here from everyone. And trust me, it's been very much appreciated. :cry: The advice to approach from the other side of the log, to bounce that front wheel off the log, and to go slower has all helped, I feel. If our weather will cooperate, I'll keep practicing. We sure do get a lot of rain here in my little portion of the western Oregon Cascades..... :cry: I'll try to get another video maybe next week of my log crossing attempts, and hopefully, we can see some progress....

Side Note/Question: Does practicing this stuff make your wrists tired & sore? Do you generally get tired after, say, a 30 minute session of practicing wheelies, turns, some bunny Hops, log crossings, & stuff? I kinda think mxing might've been somewhat easier.... Is Trials really this hard, or do I just make it seem that way? :ride:

Thanks very much, Fellas! I REALLY appreciate y'all!

Jimmie

  • DrKayak

Posted June 07, 2012 - 02:34 PM

#16

Great thread... I have been working on adding the jump to to my log crossing for 2 sessions this week. I find it best to just focus on the jump and not sweat the timming and throttle blip for now. Day one it was just a matter that I tried to jump each time and not just stay static on the bike and ride it over the log. By day 2 the jump was becoming more automatic.

And yes, I agree trials is a lot of work. I am soaked with sweat after all my trainning sessions.

  • Gandalf_WR450

Posted June 07, 2012 - 04:26 PM

#17

Side Note/Question: Does practicing this stuff make your wrists tired & sore? Do you generally get tired after, say, a 30 minute session of practicing wheelies, turns, some bunny Hops, log crossings, & stuff? I kinda think mxing might've been somewhat easier.... Is Trials really this hard, or do I just make it seem that way? :cry:


I think many on this forum can ride all day (Frostbite can without stopping) but I cant/dont. Thats why I like trials, shut it down, sit and enjoy whats going on around you, and do it again!

Seriously though, its like any sport or physical task- it is MUCH harder for us newbys- we are not loose on the bike, we are gripping the handle bars too tightly, often incorrect positioning, tensing up on approach, generally just making it more work than it has to be. Keep practicing - it will get better!

And dont sweat the learning curve- I can tell you are enjoying the learning and even at my low skill level, I have had many 'AHA' moments
where you know you dont quite got it yet, but you accidently did it right and it sure felt good- keeps you going.

I know what your saying about watching videos, but that is why 2-Ply's slow mo videos are great. The good guys do it so effortlessly that it is hard to pick up on what they are doing at normal speed.

Have Fun!

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted June 07, 2012 - 07:38 PM

#18

DrKayak & Doug,

Thanks for chiming in here, and for your encouragement! What an incredible bunch of folks that hang out here... :ride: [color=#011a4d] :cry:[/color] i am amazed at y'all!!!

It's kinda good to hear I'm not the only one here that works up a lather doing this stuff. Man, it's really giving me a huge appreciation & respect for the folks that have reached even an intermediate level of skill in the sport of trials, in both their ability and physical conditioning.

DrKayak, did you come up with a solution for your bars yet?

Gandalf_WR450 (Doug),

You bring up what I feel is a very good point. This is all FUN! Even at my lowly level of skill, I'm having a ball with this. I can ride nearly every afternoon, on my own little 2.5 acres, and the bike is quiet enough that it bothers nobody. The aspect of trying to always keep traction means it's not too terribly hard on my grass I mow. This is stuff I couldn't do with my YZ450F, or even my old KTM 300. I'm gettin' to ride more, and enjoying it more. As far as log hopping goes, I feel I'm blessed with the ability to laugh at myself, and I have a fair amount of determination. I'll eventually get some of this figured out; it just doesn't seem to come very quickly with me. [color=#011a4d] :p[/color] I tell ya what: my only regret is not getting into this sooner..... :cry:

I'm trying to kinda focus on getting ready for my first Trial competiton on Sunday, It's been raining a little here, so I haven't been out on the log much. Been working on turns & balance mostly. I have a friend that's in COTA, the local group putting on this event, and he keeps stressing to me to work on the turns. Says he sees more dabs in corners than almost anywhere else. I'm hoping to hop back over the log next week.....

Thanks again, Guys! I really appreciate all your responses, from EVERYONE. I hope this thread helps other folks too!

Jimmie

Edited by Mr. Neutron, June 08, 2012 - 02:39 PM.


  • 2PLY

Posted June 08, 2012 - 06:08 AM

#19

A BIG YES... Turns are what they throw at you because everybody works on jumping stuff first.... because it's easy! Not that there will be nothing to jump, just that your're NOT going to see many if any nice straight approaches at the logs they include. You can take a simple log and throw in a 90 degree turn 5 feet before or after and make a serious challenge out of a simple obstacle.

The other famous trick that Trials Marshals like to use on the Novice crowd, is "linked turns". Simple tight turns that are no problem alone, but when linked back to back will trap the riders that don't use the real estate available in each turn to set up for the third turn. How you use the first and second turn might determine if you make the third one or not.

When things are dry, you can lean into turns, tip your head over as you turn and even hug the frame with your legs while hanging on tight to the bars and get away with it. All things that I work hard at avoiding. But when things get slippery, those bad flaws will bite you! As you get better at maintaining a relaxed balance over the bike and let the bike lean over between your legs and dance around while you hold a soft grip on the bars, your wrists and arms will not take such a beating and you'll last a lot longer.

As I've said before, I used to have to cut the callouses on my hands because they were so thick and large that it hurt to form a fist. Now, since I went back to learn the fundamentals that I skipped so that I could teach them to others, I have no callouses that you can see. Once your legs get into condition and you learn to control the bike with your feet and not your hands, you will not work near as hard, but as simple as it appears, going slow requires a lot of little muscles that have to work constantly to maintain balance since you get no help from any gyroscopic effect from the wheels. You don't notice the use of those muscles, but it's happening and it wears you out.

I remember taking a guy out for his first Trials Motorcycle ride on one of my spare bikes in a Trials Specific area I built. He was a very good and conditioned Mountain bike racer and worked out every day in serious terrain for his events. He also owned an Enduro Motorcycle. Well, after 2 hours of riding, we took a break and I asked him if he wanted to continue. He said he was beat! He had planned to go home after our ride and work out because he didn't think he would get the workout he needed for the upcoming race. But now he was done and couldn't believe how exhausting it was to go so slow. :cry:

  • 2PLY

Posted June 08, 2012 - 06:17 AM

#20

Another very important point that they made in the TTC web site about jumping obstacles was where to look.... They said it twice!


".........On the approach, be sure to look past or through the obstacle to the point where you want to be on the far side of the obstacle............ "

"..........Remember to look past the obstacle to where you want to end up; don’t focus on the obstacle itself or you will tend to stop on it rather than over it....."


Edited by 2PLY, June 08, 2012 - 06:18 AM.





 
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