Street legal wr not so good idea?


22 replies to this topic
  • Stealth13

Posted June 02, 2012 - 09:26 AM

#1

I have a street legal wr450 and did 4000km in a few months, the mechanic says it will need a top end soon... 1500$ to do that doesn't seem like such a good bike anymore... How many km are you guys getting from top ends?

  • GlennR

Posted June 03, 2012 - 06:51 AM

#2

How many hours or miles are on your bike? What parts do you mean by "top end"?

Here's a WR450 thread about using it for adventurer riding. http://www.advrider....ad.php?t=537684

A post on the second page mentions 15,000 miles before a rebuild. Don't know if that's common or not.


Maybe you only need rings? Or do you need more?

  • Stealth13

Posted June 03, 2012 - 08:38 AM

#3

How many hours or miles are on your bike? What parts do you mean by "top end"?

Here's a WR450 thread about using it for adventurer riding. http://www.advrider....ad.php?t=537684

A post on the second page mentions 15,000 miles before a rebuild. Don't know if that's common or not.


Maybe you only need rings? Or do you need more?

It has like 4700km on it now... Runs fine I think he is just trying to sell a rebuild . So 15000 miles is like 5x what I have

  • kawi380

Posted June 03, 2012 - 09:09 AM

#4

Unless you are showing signs of wear I think your WR can go a lot further. If you follow the manual you are probably way past something, but who follows the book :cry: As you long as you are checking the valves and doing your oil changes you should be fine for a while....though it may not hurt to put some new rings on the piston

  • Stealth13

Posted June 03, 2012 - 09:32 AM

#5

Unless you are showing signs of wear I think your WR can go a lot further. If you follow the manual you are probably way past something, but who follows the book :cry: As you long as you are checking the valves and doing your oil changes you should be fine for a while....though it may not hurt to put some new rings on the piston

No idea how to check the valves, I just change the oil and ride it

  • bg10459

Posted June 03, 2012 - 09:56 AM

#6

I have well over 5k miles on my 03 WR450 that I use almost exclusively for dual sports (just did another 100+ miles yesterday :thumbsup). It still ran great even after the broken gear that resulted in a total rebuild. These bikes are super durable and super reliable. I won't say 15k miles is the norm, but 1/2 that should be easily attainable.

  • Stealth13

Posted June 03, 2012 - 10:28 AM

#7

I have well over 5k miles on my 03 WR450 that I use almost exclusively for dual sports (just did another 100+ miles yesterday :thumbsup). It still ran great even after the broken gear that resulted in a total rebuild. These bikes are super durable and super reliable. I won't say 15k miles is the norm, but 1/2 that should be easily attainable.

Just seems way most costly than driving a normal vehicles . Like 8000 miles and costs 1500 to rebuild the top end is quite a bit.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 03, 2012 - 12:13 PM

#8

I have a street legal wr450 and did 4000km in a few months, the mechanic says it will need a top end soon... 1500$ to do that doesn't seem like such a good bike anymore... How many km are you guys getting from top ends?


My top end cost about $200 and about 4 hrs of my time. You really need to do this yourself. It is very easy to do. You just need to pay attention to details and ask this forum for help. That's what I did.

At 4km, its not super critical that you do it right now, especially if its running good. But definitely start thinking about it. I rode mine about 8K "miles" which is longer than you but wish I hadn't waited so long.

Edited by mauricedorris, June 03, 2012 - 12:15 PM.


  • GlennR

Posted June 03, 2012 - 01:39 PM

#9

My top end cost about $200 and about 4 hrs of my time. You really need to do this yourself. It is very easy to do. You just need to pay attention to details and ask this forum for help. That's what I did.

At 4km, its not super critical that you do it right now, especially if its running good. But definitely start thinking about it. I rode mine about 8K "miles" which is longer than you but wish I hadn't waited so long.



What all did you replace? How did you decide it was time? Was the bike smoking or using oil, or was the compression low?

  • Stealth13

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:36 PM

#10

200 seems too cheap he said 700 just In parts and then 800 in labor at 60 an hour

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  • n16ht5

Posted June 03, 2012 - 07:10 PM

#11

Your mechanic is a douchebag. Back in the XR days we knew it was time for a top end when your friends didnt want to ride behind you because of all the smoke.


Unless your bike is burning oil, dont worry about it. And ditch the lame mechanic..


Did you gear up for street yet? High rpm will eat valves after time

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 03, 2012 - 07:18 PM

#12

What all did you replace? How did you decide it was time? Was the bike smoking or using oil, or was the compression low?


Piston, rings and gaskets.

If you valves are ok, then why mess with them.

After years of hard riding and abuse, I just decided one day to take the head off and replace the piston. The bike had at least 8K miles on it at the time. It didn't smoke, burn oil or anything. Yes... the compression was a bit low and the engine had lost some of its snap. But it was running strong and still started first stab of the button.

One thing I did know was that when it was cold, it took 5 or 6 kicks to get it started. But when warm, it started first kick. that's the sign of wear on the rings.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 03, 2012 - 07:32 PM

#13

200 seems too cheap he said 700 just In parts and then 800 in labor at 60 an hour


Most of us with wr450's change the piston every few years. Some of us have to actually shim a valve every few years. Most of us are on the same valves.

If you pay someone to replace the piston, rings, valves, springs, valve seals and recut the valve seats, you will spend $1500. You mechanic is not ripping you off. If you were riding a Honda, then I would tell you that 4km is long, long, long overdue for that work.

But Yamaha's are different. The longevity of these motors is unrivaled with modern bikes. Throw the book out and listen to and feel the motor.

If its lost a little bark on the bottom end, the rings may be worn. If you try to kick start it and don't feel a lot of compression on the kick starter, then the rings may be worn.

I say you do the work yourself. Pull the top end. Take the head off and pour gasoline into the intake and exhaust chambers. If it doesn't leak past the valves, then they are seated perfectly. You don't need to get any head work done. they call this a poor mans leak down test.



But once you have it apart, inspect the cylinder. It should be perfectly smooth with no gouges in it. use a scotch brite pad and some wd40 and scrub the inside walls of your cylinder. That's all it will need.

change the piston and rings. At 8K miles, which is about 12K km (three times as long), with hard riding, racing, etc... my valves were perfectly seated and passed the poor mans leak down test.

My piston was good but I replaced it anyway because I bought a new one up front.

bike ran just fine. Get a manual, do the work yourself, spend $200, learn about your bike.

Oh... do yourself a huge favor and replace the water pump seal. I didn't replace that when I did the piston, the bike overheated, and did more damage in one afternoon than I did in 5 years of riding.

You need a manual. Do you have one?

  • Alpha One Nine

Posted June 03, 2012 - 08:02 PM

#14

What is the expected service life of the cam chain? I was assuming that would be part of my top end rebuild when I do it for my 05.

  • Stealth13

Posted June 03, 2012 - 09:14 PM

#15

What is the expected service life of the cam chain? I was assuming that would be part of my top end rebuild when I do it for my 05.

This was included in the rebuild price. He says do it when doing piston and such .

The bike hasn't lost any power, I wasn't complaining about it at all, the mechanic just said I have a ton of kilometers on it and should look at a rebuild . I figured screw it, when it shows signs it needs one then I'll get it done.

And Maurice I would love to do the work myself if sOmeone could show me how. Kind of hard never taken an engine apart before.

Edited by Stealth13, June 03, 2012 - 09:19 PM.


  • GlennR

Posted June 04, 2012 - 04:54 AM

#16

Most of us with wr450's change the piston every few years. Some of us have to actually shim a valve every few years. Most of us are on the same valves.

If you pay someone to replace the piston, rings, valves, springs, valve seals and recut the valve seats, you will spend $1500. You mechanic is not ripping you off. If you were riding a Honda, then I would tell you that 4km is long, long, long overdue for that work.

But Yamaha's are different. The longevity of these motors is unrivaled with modern bikes. Throw the book out and listen to and feel the motor.

If its lost a little bark on the bottom end, the rings may be worn. If you try to kick start it and don't feel a lot of compression on the kick starter, then the rings may be worn.

I say you do the work yourself. Pull the top end. Take the head off and pour gasoline into the intake and exhaust chambers. If it doesn't leak past the valves, then they are seated perfectly. You don't need to get any head work done. they call this a poor mans leak down test.



But once you have it apart, inspect the cylinder. It should be perfectly smooth with no gouges in it. use a scotch brite pad and some wd40 and scrub the inside walls of your cylinder. That's all it will need.

change the piston and rings. At 8K miles, which is about 12K km (three times as long), with hard riding, racing, etc... my valves were perfectly seated and passed the poor mans leak down test.

My piston was good but I replaced it anyway because I bought a new one up front.

bike ran just fine. Get a manual, do the work yourself, spend $200, learn about your bike.

Oh... do yourself a huge favor and replace the water pump seal. I didn't replace that when I did the piston, the bike overheated, and did more damage in one afternoon than I did in 5 years of riding.

You need a manual. Do you have one?



Is the "Owner's Service Manual" what you mean? Btw, here's a pdf from Yamaha for that : http://www.yamahaown...om.au/index.php

I have a hard copy that came with my bike too, but it's handy to have the pdf on my computer.

I have been inside the motor and understand what makes it tick, but it would be great if there's a video to watch. Just to make sure I don't miss something. Wonder if any good mechanics use a helmet-cam while wrenching? :cry:

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 04, 2012 - 06:36 AM

#17

Is the "Owner's Service Manual" what you mean? Btw, here's a pdf from Yamaha for that : http://www.yamahaown...om.au/index.php

I have a hard copy that came with my bike too, but it's handy to have the pdf on my computer.

I have been inside the motor and understand what makes it tick, but it would be great if there's a video to watch. Just to make sure I don't miss something. Wonder if any good mechanics use a helmet-cam while wrenching? :cry:


If you've been inside, you probably know by now that the top end is pretty simple once you understand the steps.

You can google "rocky mountain atv mc videos". They have a good collection of maintenance videos. Not all are for yamaha's, but the basic steps are the same.

You can also buy a video at www.motopowervideo.com

  • Rot Box

Posted June 04, 2012 - 08:26 AM

#18

I ride mine (426 very similar) a LOT on the street and have ever since I bought it two years ago. I bought it without knowing any history on the motor so who knows?!--Runs great, valves are in spec and it feels fine. Its probably long overdue but I plan to tear it down and replace whats worn this winter. $1500 sounds about right for the cost of an overhaul (paying labor) + genuine parts. Whether or not you need it is hard for me to say.

I love riding mine as a dual sport but while the WR has a wider gear box than the YZ it is not nearly as wide as it should be for dual sport imo. If you're gearing is low (high revs on the highway) you'll wear the topend much faster over time. For trails (rocky mountain single track) I like 13-51 gearing and for the street 14-47 gets me by. In some cases I'll plan ahead so that if I'm going to be riding technical trails I'll just swap over sprockets which is annoying. Proper chain tension is actually fairly important on these as well where they don't have a cush drive hub in the rear. They'll slap like crazy or even cause the bike to surge if they're not adjusted properly. I also recommend running no smaller than a 14T front if you don't like the sound of chain slap and running both rim locks is good too :cry:

If you're going to learn how to work on it and replace things like the top end I HIGHLY recommend buying a good torque wrench and don't tighten a single bolt without it. Of all the bikes I've ever owned these are the worst for stripping threads when bolts are over-tightened :cry:

Edited by Rot Box, June 04, 2012 - 08:27 AM.


  • Stealth13

Posted June 05, 2012 - 06:13 AM

#19

Well if I can get 15k km before a top end that's way more reasonable. Buddy with the Ktm 525 says I'll need a lot more maintenance than his.

  • Rot Box

Posted June 05, 2012 - 06:47 AM

#20

Well if I can get 15k km before a top end that's way more reasonable. Buddy with the Ktm 525 says I'll need a lot more maintenance than his.


Geez... I think you need a new mechanic and buddy! :cry: j/k. 525's are great bikes but to say the WR will need a lot more maintenance than one is speculation at best imo.

Edited by Rot Box, June 05, 2012 - 06:47 AM.





 
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