Tire Pressure



7 replies to this topic
  • dhowell

Posted September 10, 2001 - 03:58 AM

#1

I need a some help on this one. I was out yesterday riding in slightly looser stuff than I usually ride in and my front was washing out more than usual. I realize in a perfect world changing the tires would be the best move, but I don't have that luxury. What is the rule of thumb as far as tire pressure is concerned when riding in more sandy terrain? What about mud?

  • Mr_Toyz

Posted September 10, 2001 - 06:05 AM

#2

My advise would be never run lower than 12 lbs. Even that is pretty low.

mud 13
sand 13
rock 15-16
soft dirt 14
hard pack 15

I've always set front and back the same and had great success.

Mr T

  • dhowell

Posted September 10, 2001 - 10:03 AM

#3

Thanks, I will try it out this weekend.

  • MX_Tuner

Posted September 10, 2001 - 10:07 AM

#4

Personally, I use 12 psi unless I have a reason to alter from there. In mud, I go as low as 9 psi and run 14 to 15 in rocks. In teh desert bikes we run up to 18 psi.

------------------
MX Tuner

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  • forloop

Posted September 10, 2001 - 12:10 PM

#5

First, I agree with MxTuner. I use 12 most of the time too.

I did find this bit of info from dunlop. It suggests that when muddy you inflate your tires. I assume they want the tire more firm so the knobs clean better or stick in the ground better.??
http://www.dunlopmot...ffroadfacts.asp




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Rick
01 YZ426F #85 Vet C

  • F-Pilot

Posted September 10, 2001 - 01:39 PM

#6

I know it's "not an option" but if you're running the stock Dunlop 739 it just doesn't work except on asphalt.
Softer dirt needs higher pressures, maybe 15psi, hard pack needs less, about 10-13psi.
The pressure will go up after the tires are warm, the air temp is warmer and if you change altitude.
One thing that can help alot is fork height.
If it's washing out then raise the forks (5-10mm above the top clamp) if it's tucking under lower the forks (flush with the top clamp).
Just my $.02

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'00 YZ426F
RIDE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT!
http://communities.m...m/FPilotsPhotos

  • motoman393

Posted September 10, 2001 - 01:47 PM

#7

Hard pack= 17-18 psi (or when jumping really high, like SX)
Soft stuff (groomed track)= 13 psi

If you run a low psi on hard pack you will get sidewall flex and you rear tire will want to "wash" out same with the front also! And of course you also run the risk of popping a tube at lower psi's! Tire pressure has a major impact on how fast you can ride safely. I ride with a few people who never check air pressure in their tires (or do any maintainence for that matter) and it shows in their riding skill and the reliability in their bike(s)! Hope this helps,

Garrett

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I get my kicks on a 426!
Motoman393's MX Site

  • scwheelieking

Posted September 10, 2001 - 04:49 PM

#8

Tire pressure wont make bike push in sand.Your rear suspension is probably set to soft,stiffen it up two clicks and make sure the line on forks are even in the top clamp.
Try it and let me know.





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