Dr.D's engine relocation kit


29 replies to this topic
  • rotax800

Posted May 09, 2012 - 02:50 AM

#1

Wondering if anyone has any real feedback on this item. lowered my forks 5mm seemed to help with pushing but want more. Rode my buddies 2012 kx450f and bone stock the front end was planted and made you feel very confident. Looking for the same feel on my 2011 yz 450. Any other tips appreciated.
Thanks
Tim

  • thefickler

Posted May 09, 2012 - 07:31 AM

#2

You noticed a difference with 5mm?

And I don't know anything about that kit, but just by the sound of it...it sounds like a lot of work/hassle to me. What is supposed to be the gain with that system? Is it even moving the motor enough to gain a noticeable difference?

  • danZ73

Posted May 09, 2012 - 11:33 AM

#3

http://www.thumperta...ine-reposition/

  • rotax800

Posted May 13, 2012 - 03:51 PM

#4

You noticed a difference with 5mm?

And I don't know anything about that kit, but just by the sound of it...it sounds like a lot of work/hassle to me. What is supposed to be the gain with that system? Is it even moving the motor enough to gain a noticeable difference?

Yes, I noticed a big dif. with 5mm. Now i've made the collars and front mounts at my buddies machine shop and i went 3mm and all i can tell u is it's SWEET! Huge dif. over stock. The front is planted, not as nervous at high speed and you can now powerslide out of corners without that awful "hook-spin, hook-spin"when powering out of corners. I know it'll be a big improvement ice racing this winter.

  • motocrosschump

Posted May 24, 2012 - 01:19 PM

#5

So..I just bought a 2010 and the turning is horrific. You are saying Dropping the forks in the Clamps helps? Every bike in the past that pushed like this in the corner, raising the forks helped. So its opposite?

  • HRC

Posted May 25, 2012 - 06:58 AM

#6

Yeah sounds strange ?

The ruel has always been... If you lower the forks ( top of fork level with clamp) makes bike more stable on straights but slightly harder to turn.

If you move the fork up in the clamps this make bike turn better but slightly more nervous in straightline.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 25, 2012 - 09:35 AM

#7

So..I just bought a 2010 and the turning is horrific.


What specifically is "horrific"? It pushes? Probably too much rear sag.

  • mx4life421

Posted May 25, 2012 - 06:22 PM

#8

Its interesting when people say their bike "handles like crap" or "horrific" in our case. Im not pro but im a solid B rider, and I know for a fact that riding technique and form is 99% of cornering. So next time you say your bike doesnt corner (like the YZF which I have and love the way it corners) make sure your form is good

  • phiderman

Posted May 25, 2012 - 06:54 PM

#9

that is for sure. the bike is very sensitive to body positioning and clicker adjustment. especially compared to my old 2007. it took me a little while to gel with the bike, but now that i have i really enjoy it.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 25, 2012 - 07:30 PM

#10

...the bike is very sensitive to body positioning and clicker adjustment. ...compared to my old 2007.


...which was already about twice as sensitive to that sort of thing as the old steel framed bikes were. :cry:

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  • Stu2

Posted May 25, 2012 - 10:22 PM

#11

I have the DrD relocation kit and it definately helped, I also tried the pro circuit lowering link but the stock is better with the DrD kit,

As said riding technique helps more than adjusting the fork height, I have raced a few different yz's (Off road) and you almost have to lean the bike over while staying upright, if that makes sense, like sitting on the corner of the seat, probly goes for any bike but the yz's have different cornering charachteristics

  • Gunner354

Posted May 26, 2012 - 06:31 AM

#12

...which was already about twice as sensitive to that sort of thing as the old steel framed bikes were. :cry:


Are you saying that the steel frame with the new motor configuration might be better? Im old school and love the fact that KTM still uses chromoly frames and they work. I do like the reversed motor though. I had thought of the that before Cannondale came out with it. Seems like I have heard and read about trying to get the new generation aluminum frames to work since the conception in 1997.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 26, 2012 - 07:43 AM

#13

Are you saying that the steel frame with the new motor configuration might be better?


No. But stuff like that can be somewhat subjective and a matter of preference. The sensitivity to small changes in ergos and geometry is a byproduct of centralizing the mass within the chassis. Centralization is, like a lot of things, a kind of two edged sword in that it solves a lot of problems but creates other ones as it does so. Have the bulk of the mass very close to the center of gravity make it easier for the rider to control and change the attitude of the bike in motion, but it also presents challenges related to the suspension. The same thing that makes it easy for you to change the bikes position also makes it easy for obstacles you run over to do the same thing, like when you strike a bump with the front wheel. Because of the centralized mass, the front is more easily pitched upward by things you run into, so the suspension has to be supple enough to prevent that, but it must still also be capable of handling the entire weight of the bike when you land flat or front first.

The cornering issues, though, are more a matter of geometry than anything else.


I have raced a few different yz's (Off road) and you almost have to lean the bike over while staying upright, if that makes sense, like sitting on the corner of the seat, probly goes for any bike but the yz's have different cornering charachteristics


That's a good observation, and it is actually true of most modern competition dirt bikes, some more than others. It has to do with a combination of steering geometry and the height of the center of gravity, and is more obvious at lower speeds than high.

A motorcycle turns by a combination of steering the front wheel and leaning into corners. Almost everyone has rolled a wheel or disk on the ground and noticed that if it leans over form vertical, it turns in the direction it leans. That's because as it rolls, the tread rolling down into contact with the ground is pointed in that direction. As it slows and falls farther over, it turns progressively smaller circles.

So, then, when you turn a bike, the mass of bike and rider must lean inside in order to maintain balance against the centrifugal force trying to tip the unit over to the outside. Since a bike with a higher CG has a greater tendency to fall inward when leaned, you lean it less in slower corners than in faster ones where the centrifugal force would be higher. The reduced lean angle then requires more turning force from the front wheel, which increases the load on it and makes it more likely to push. By keeping your body more upright than the bike, you trade off some of that steering load for the natural tendency of a leaning wheel to roll in a circle, which, incidentally, means that the rear wheel is actually taking part in turning the bike as well.

  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 26, 2012 - 11:54 AM

#14

I've asked this in other posts but I'll ask it here as well. Do you think the shift of weight from a relocation kit will work better than a lowering link or triple clamp (Changing geometry) to help with the quirky steering issues at slower speeds?

  • grayracer513

Posted May 26, 2012 - 07:44 PM

#15

I've asked this in other posts but I'll ask it here as well. Do you think the shift of weight from a relocation kit will work better than a lowering link or triple clamp (Changing geometry) to help with the quirky steering issues at slower speeds?


The consensus seems to be that the kit works better than the link, and that they don't work well together.

  • FZ1426

Posted May 26, 2012 - 08:26 PM

#16

Its interesting when people say their bike "handles like crap" or "horrific" in our case. Im not pro but im a solid B rider, and I know for a fact that riding technique and form is 99% of cornering. So next time you say your bike doesnt corner (like the YZF which I have and love the way it corners) make sure your form is good


Bingo. Every time I feel like my bike isn't cornering well I realize it's because I'm getting lazy and sitting too far back. If you do the math it's a hell of a lot more effective to move your entire body weight forward 2 inches than to move 70 lbs forward 2mm...

  • BBrown626

Posted May 27, 2012 - 09:58 PM

#17

Wondering if anyone has any real feedback on this item. lowered my forks 5mm seemed to help with pushing but want more. Rode my buddies 2012 kx450f and bone stock the front end was planted and made you feel very confident. Looking for the same feel on my 2011 yz 450. Any other tips appreciated.
Thanks
Tim


The DRD kit does what they claim. It really does feel better in the corners and you can take tighter lines. I run my forks about 7mm up in the clamps.
This bike is very sensative to adjustments, particularly sag and fork height.
Of course you do need to set you bike up for your weight. Set your sag. Adjust the fork height for the track, etc. You can't just slip in the engine relocation kit and skip the basics.

  • rotax800

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:52 AM

#18

Wondering if anyone has any real feedback on this item. lowered my forks 5mm seemed to help with pushing but want more. Rode my buddies 2012 kx450f and bone stock the front end was planted and made you feel very confident. Looking for the same feel on my 2011 yz 450. Any other tips appreciated.
Thanks
Tim

Sorry guys, meant raised forks 5 mm.

  • rotax800

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:56 AM

#19

The DRD kit does what they claim. It really does feel better in the corners and you can take tighter lines. I run my forks about 7mm up in the clamps.
This bike is very sensative to adjustments, particularly sag and fork height.
Of course you do need to set you bike up for your weight. Set your sag. Adjust the fork height for the track, etc. You can't just slip in the engine relocation kit and skip the basics.

Yeah, I get it. Bike was all set up for my weight prior to adjusting fork height or installing my relocate kit, and i've since found the sweet spot for me to be 5 mm raised with 105 mm sag, though im on the verge of needing a heavier spring. Gonna try to lose a few pounds first, lol

  • FZ1426

Posted June 03, 2012 - 05:29 PM

#20

The good news is you've still got room for improvement by going to a heavier spring and/or going to 100mm of sag. It will turn much better with less sag.The manual recommends 90-100 mm.

Have a cheeseburger and a beer! :cry:





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