New 2011 thoughts and can't seem to stay in neutral?


14 replies to this topic
  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 08, 2012 - 03:41 PM

#1

Just picked up my new bike, a holdover 2011. Before I even got a chance to ride I added a Lexx spark arrestor and using the smaller insert to keep the noise to a minimum. It went on pretty easy and looks nice, the black carbon fiber matches the black on the bike. I also installed my narrower protaper cr high bars and cycra handguards from my other bike. I fired took it for literally a 5 minute ride just before I had to race off to work. My first thoughts were WOW! My last few bikes were 2001's and older and the throttle response was crazy! My GYTR tuner will be in thursday and hoping that will take a little bark off the low end. I might also try a G2 throttle so I can roll on and off a little smoother but we'll see. It's going to be my hare scramble/enduro bike and gearing feels a little tall but I'm afraid it will get jumpier if I gear up to a 50t in the back. Have to wait and see on the tuner again. The bike literally has run for about 10 minutes ever so I expected the trans might be a little notchy but I couldn't get the damn thing in neutral for the life of me! With the bike off I can find it, but then if I roll slightly forward or back to make sure I'm in neutral it kicks back into gear. I messed around for about 5 minutes and finally got it to stay in neutral. I'm not really concerned except I couldn't get it to fire up with the clutch in and in gear very easy. I'm hoping as I put a few hours on it tomorrow it will loosen up and work a little better. The shifting didn't seem bad when I was riding it but definately had issues with neutral running or off. I must say I'm super impressed with the bike and it feels much lighter than my last few 250's. I ripped on the throttle a couple times and I can already see it's going to be a chore to keep the front end on the gound! I'll post back in a couple days of riding to see how things are going then.

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  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 08, 2012 - 03:57 PM

#2

Oh yeah one more quick stupid question. My owner forgot the owners manual so I'm waiting for it to arrive. Reference the shock and forks are the compression adjustments on the top of the forks and bottom of the shock?

  • AliGee

Posted May 08, 2012 - 04:55 PM

#3

Oh yeah one more quick stupid question. My owner forgot the owners manual so I'm waiting for it to arrive. Reference the shock and forks are the compression adjustments on the top of the forks and bottom of the shock?


I googled "2010 YZ450F manual" and I was able to download a free pdf version of my manual...

  • grayracer513

Posted May 08, 2012 - 06:40 PM

#4

Oh yeah one more quick stupid question. My owner forgot the owners manual so I'm waiting for it to arrive. Reference the shock and forks are the compression adjustments on the top of the forks and bottom of the shock?


Not quite. Fork compression is on top, rebound on the bottom. Shock low speed compression on the top (slot screw), high speed compression on the top (17mm hex, no clicker), shock rebound on the bottom right side.

If the bike falls back in gear in "neutral", you most likely are not looking for neutral between 1st and 2nd. With only 10 minutes on the clutch, it isn't "burned in" yet. It will release more easily with time, but you may not be able to get the bike to start very well in gear anyway.

  • MX763

Posted May 09, 2012 - 05:51 AM

#5

When my 2011 was new, neutral was a pain in the ass. It was also an even bigger pain in the ass to start. This will get better the more hours you put on the bike.

  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 11, 2012 - 03:31 AM

#6

I have 4 hours on the bike now and I'm using the woods map and very happy! Going to gear to 50t rear because 1st is still too tall. I'm going to buy the G2 throttle tamer next. I think the power is perfect but had a couple whiskey throttle moments with the toggle switch they call a throttle! I was fine until I got tired then I noticed my slow speed throttle control was a little crazy at times. I'm 215lbs but can't get the sag less than 85mm with the stock spring. My front end was really twitchy and again after I got tired it got pretty squirrelly with the quick steering. Race tech calculated my spring at nearly stock (slightly heavier) and I don't think I can loosen the preload much more without the spring being loose? I'm sure the sag was why it was twitchy in the steering and I'm hoping maybe the spring will wear in a little more and loosen up? I backed the compression out all the way on the clickers and left he rebound and it felt pretty good in the tight rocky and root infested trails. Neutral is definately easier now so I'm no longer concerned with that.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 11, 2012 - 07:21 AM

#7

I'm 215lbs but can't get the sag less than 85mm with the stock spring. My front end was really twitchy and again after I got tired it got pretty squirrelly with the quick steering. Race tech calculated my spring at nearly stock (slightly heavier) and I don't think I can loosen the preload much more without the spring being loose?


I think you're confused. There are three measurements to be taken when setting sag:
  • Suspension at full extension (bike on a stand, wheels off the ground)
  • Rider or Race sag (taken with you on the bike in your gear, preferably standing on the pegs neither leaning on or pulling back on the bars)
  • Free or Static sag (taken with the bike on the ground, no load)
Your rider sag should be about 100mm. You can go up or down from that 5-6 mm to change things around. Once you have that set, you should check the free sag. If the spring rate is correct, this will measure roughly 25-30mm. If the free sag is less than that, it means the spring is too light for your weight. More free sag means the spring is too stiff.

http://www.tootechra...ension_tips.htm
http://www.tootechra...pension Tip.htm

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  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 11, 2012 - 08:06 AM

#8

Oops you're right, I meant I can't get the sag more than 85mm not less.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 11, 2012 - 09:14 AM

#9

You can't get more than 85mm of sag with you on the bike?

  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 11, 2012 - 04:14 PM

#10

No I'm roughly getting 3- 3 1/4" of sag right now. That is from the bike sitting empty and then me sitting on it. I'd like it to be more stable than quick steering so I was hoping to be a little soft in the back but doesn't look like I can get there. I'm about 215 without my gear so I'm surprised it's holding me up so well. I backed the adjustment ring a long ways, I'm afraid if I go more I'm simply going to have the spring become loose?

  • grayracer513

Posted May 11, 2012 - 09:40 PM

#11

If that happens, you can tighten it back up. If it hasn't yet, then I'd keep going and see what happens.

  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 11, 2012 - 09:48 PM

#12

Ok I'll back it off some more and see if it gets loose. From what I'm reading it should be more than soft enough for me, maybe a little more break in time would help too?

  • AliGee

Posted May 12, 2012 - 10:42 AM

#13

Ok I'll back it off some more and see if it gets loose. From what I'm reading it should be more than soft enough for me, maybe a little more break in time would help too?


Soaking wet with all my gear on, I'd be surprised if I weighed close to 150lbs. I was able to set the sag on my 2010 to 100mm with stock suspension. The shock is as firm as it gets when you get the bike new... But you still should have no problem getting the sag set for your weight. I'd keep cranking at it.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 12, 2012 - 04:55 PM

#14

No I'm roughly getting 3- 3 1/4" of sag right now. That is from the bike sitting empty and then me sitting on it.


There is the problem. I knew there was something wrong with the picture. Go back to post number 7 and reread it. Then visit the first of the two links I posted.

You are measuring the distance from the free sag height ("the bike sitting empty") and the loaded height (you sitting on it). The funny part (or at least, the part that will be funny in a couple of weeks) is that just about no matter what you do with the adjuster, that measurement won't really change much.

You should be measuring the distance from the axle to a reference point directly above it that you can mark and repeat with the suspension fully extended, wheels off the ground, bike on a stand. Then you measure between the same two points with you sitting in your normal riding position. THAT is your sag.

After that's set, you can measure how far it sags under its own weight (free sag) so you can tell if the spring rate is fairly close or not..

Check those links.

  • upnorthbacon

Posted May 12, 2012 - 06:11 PM

#15

Yep, I'm a dumbass! I completely read that wrong, I'll re-measure!





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