Sprocket teeth?



24 replies to this topic
  • Eagle426

Posted October 08, 2003 - 06:51 PM

#1

One tooth on the front sprocket is equivalent to how many teeth on the rear? I am debating on going from stock, up one tooth in the front to a 15/50 set up or dropping on the rear and going with a 14/48. :)

  • The_Blue_One

Posted October 08, 2003 - 07:11 PM

#2

I may be wrong but i think it is 1 in front to 5 in back. :D

I was wrong and now i know for sure.

Thanks guys :)

  • toyota_mdt_tech

Posted October 08, 2003 - 07:33 PM

#3

One tooth on the front sprocket is equivalent to how many teeth on the rear? I am debating on going from stock, up one tooth in the front to a 15/50 set up or dropping on the rear and going with a 14/48. :D



It will depend. Just use a calculator and divide the front teeth into the rear. Example, a 13/47 has a numerical ratio of: 3.62:1 while a 14/50 is almost the same. If the ratio is 3.62:1, then you have about 3.62 teeth equal to one in the front. So technically, its between 3 and 4, you dont want to run a 1/2 tooth. :D I look at the front as a "course" adjustment while the rear spocket being considered a "fine" adjustment. Careful on the front, too small will creat a sharper bend for the chain, increases wear and "pulls down" on the chain where it runs on the slider, also accelerating wear on the slider. And then the rear, the chain guide may be in the way if you go too large, you may have to redrill some holes to move it forward a bit as it may hit the rear sprocket. :)

  • chrome-crf

Posted October 08, 2003 - 07:33 PM

#4

1 on the front is a little more than 3 on the rear. So a 14/50 is the same as a 15/47 or a 13/53. :)

  • toyota_mdt_tech

Posted October 08, 2003 - 07:35 PM

#5

One tooth on the front sprocket is equivalent to how many teeth on the rear? I am debating on going from stock, up one tooth in the front to a 15/50 set up or dropping on the rear and going with a 14/48. :)


3.4 on this case.

  • ill_caper

Posted October 08, 2003 - 08:16 PM

#6

You should change the teeth on the back. By changing the teeth on the front it COULD put more tension on the chain by making it bend.

  • Sylvain

Posted October 09, 2003 - 06:59 AM

#7

1 in the front = app 3 in the back

It's better to change the ratio with the rear sprocket, less strain on the chain. :)

I've read in this forum that some installed a 17 teeth for front with some minor mod for clearance. But I think it applied to a supermotard mod.

I myself tried a 13 / 50 combo for very tight and mud event, but I went back to the stock set up right after.

It's tempting to play with the front sprocket because it is easier to change than the rear and cheaper. But it's always a personnal affair.

  • Math

Posted October 09, 2003 - 07:09 AM

#8

So a 14/50 is the same as a 15/47 or a 13/53.



Wo Wo!! 14/50 would be similar to 15/52 or 13/47 but surely not 15/47 or 13/53.

If you want to gear for more top speed I would suggest that you remain with the 14 front. because available rear sprockets exist in sizes 42 to 52 (approximately).

The goal is to have a lot of choice on both end. The WR being geared 14/50 does not let a lot of choice for the rear to be bigger: only the 52 is available to my knowledge.

Since you want to go for a gearing that would allow faster speeds: the 14/47 leaves you with the choice to increase 5 teeth or reduce 5 teeth on the rear and this way you have a great choice of rear whatever you want to go faster or not.

If you go for the 15/50. You have no choice on the rear but to go for smaller sprockets.

I always prefer messing with rear sprockets than with the front. Once you installed your front sprocket I think it should remain in place until it has to be replaced.

14/47 and 15/50 are great for woods riding.

Just my opinion.

Ciao

  • Eagle426

Posted October 09, 2003 - 01:17 PM

#9

I am not exactly looking for more top speed, but that is what I am going to end up with. I want a more usable 1st gear. The way it is now, I never use it. First gear is geared to low, so if I go to 14/47 or 14/48 it would raise the gearing slightly while gaining top speed as well! Correct me if I am wrong!

  • Math

Posted October 09, 2003 - 01:25 PM

#10

You are right. If your first is too slow, the situation will improve by reducing the rear sprocket size and you will end up with more top speed as well.

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  • Eagle426

Posted October 09, 2003 - 02:07 PM

#11

The way it is now, 2nd gear is my gear of choice for hillclimbing. Shoot the gas to her, feather the clutch and climb like the devil. If I go to a 14/47 or 14/48, is it really going to make 1st gear that much more usable and will is make 2nd gear less usable in the same situation. I guess I want to know how much of a difference it will make. I realize that I am going to just try it and see if I like it, but I hate to burn $50 or so on a rear sprocket to dislike it and let it hang on the garage wall! Thanks!

  • toyota_mdt_tech

Posted October 09, 2003 - 08:35 PM

#12

The way it is now, I never use it. First gear is geared to low, so if I go to 14/47 or 14/48 it would raise the gearing slightly while gaining top speed as well! Correct me if I am wrong!


Yes, assuming you have the stock gearing which I beleive is 14/50, which is 3.57:1, while the 14/47 (3.36:1) or the 14/48 combo (3.43:1), so the lower the number (ratio) numerically, the higher the gear ratio, the faster you will go.

  • chrome-crf

Posted October 09, 2003 - 08:43 PM

#13

Wo Wo!! 14/50 would be similar to 15/52 or 13/47 but surely not 15/47 or 13/53.

Sorry, you are correct I was day dreaming when I wrote that. A 14/50 would be similar to a 15/52-53 or 13/47 :)

  • Math

Posted October 10, 2003 - 07:02 AM

#14

Quote:
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Wo Wo!! 14/50 would be similar to 15/52 or 13/47 but surely not 15/47 or 13/53.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Sorry, you are correct I was day dreaming when I wrote that. A 14/50 would be similar to a 15/52-53 or 13/47



Don't worry, I knew it was just a little inattention Chrome :) but I just wanted to avoid confusion.

If you really want to hill climb in first gear instead than in second, I'm not sure 14/47 is enough. three teeth variation on the rear sprocket is not enough to make your 1st gear feel like your actual second. You will feel a difference but can't say if it's gonna be enough.

You know, I think it also relates to how you ride the bike. Hill climbing here is always in trails formed by water going down hill so the terrain is rather muddy. My technique is to let the engine torque at low rpms so the tire could reach a grip somewhere deep in the mud. I've been riding the bike in those conditions with ratios as fast as 16/47 using 1st and 2nd gear and the engine never dies. So I would say: don't be afraid to gear in a 14/45 or 15/48. This engine is soooo powerfull.

Just make sure that your 1st gear won't be too fast at idle for those very tight sections. The problem occurs instantly with a 16 t front sprocket so I would say that 15/48 is something like a limit for tight woods riding and hillclimb combination.

Hope that helps

  • WR_Jason

Posted October 10, 2003 - 10:37 AM

#15

I geared my 2nd gear for most riding conditions including all but the highest loose pack hills in wich case you have to ram into them in 3rd or 4th gear as fast as you can without bouncing off the face of the bottom of the hill.
The problem with gearing 1st for most of your riding is you dont have that ultra low granny goat gear for rock crawling AND, the jump between 1st and 2nd becomes exagerated and makes the bike VERY hard to ride in a jam between those two gears like hill climbing. When you have your first geared up, and you top it out and want just a little more speed but still be in the sweet power and traction area, you shift to 2nd and the wide ratio differance leaves you dogging to low in the RPM in 2nd. Whats worse is climbing a hill in 2nd and getting tripped up to the point you have to shift, you find 1st is wound to high and you loose all your momentem and traction in the lug zone becuase your spun to the red line in first.
I really perfer riding 2nd gear as if it were first and having first for rock crawling or starting out in a hard spot. The ratio between 2nd and 3rd is much closer and usable than the wide ratio between 1st and 2nd. Just someting to think about. Stalling the blue beast even with a button is still dangerous as your dead in the water so to speak, and if the water is a steep hill,,, thats bad :)

  • Indy_WR450

Posted October 11, 2003 - 04:39 AM

#16

I am with WR Jason on this. You cant modify first high enough to ride it so leave it as a technical trials bike gear which is what Yamaha intended. At most you can change first gear up is a 15/46 and it may be taller but it it is still too low for regular riding. Now you can gear the sprockets to make second and third work for you. I think gearing down makes staying in third in the woods a little easier and fan the clutch coming out of the corners without having to shift down to second. :)

  • Math

Posted October 12, 2003 - 02:47 PM

#17

I'm with you two guys. I only ride the first gear for very difficult sections and most of hill climbing is in the 2nd and wood riding in the third... I think the best ratio is something like 14/48 for guys riding woods.

  • Eagle426

Posted October 12, 2003 - 04:06 PM

#18

I have been looking at the Ironman sprockets, it is a toss up between 14/47 or 14/48; and a DID x-ring or the Regina ORS chain. How much of a difference will the 2 or 3 less teeth on the rear sprocket make on the chain length? Would I need to shorten the chain, or just move the axel back to maintain the stock length chain?

  • Math

Posted October 13, 2003 - 10:20 AM

#19

The original lenght will fit with the 14/48 ratio.

  • holeshot426

Posted October 13, 2003 - 10:59 AM

#20

Just think though, the further your axle is back, the better you will be able to hill climb!




 
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