2005 wr450 cosmetic update (lots of pics)


94 replies to this topic
  • Tungtran

Posted March 15, 2012 - 10:11 PM

#21

very nice tips.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 16, 2012 - 04:27 PM

#22

OK... the bike is currently a basket case. I got parts all over the friggen place. I want to give the frame a few more days to dry out. I can still smell the paint on it a little. (If you can still smell it, its not fully dry)

While I wait, I'll put in the new wheel bearings and change my fork oil. I had just re-greased my swing arm and linkage bearings about six months ago and have hardly ridden the bike since. But, I'll pack some more grease in there anyways...

Here is the current status of the bike...

Posted Image

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted March 16, 2012 - 05:28 PM

#23

Hey Maurice, lookin' good.

Hang the frame near your furnace, if it's in the garage. It will dry it quick. Keeping it outside through wide temp swings with delay drying by weeks.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 16, 2012 - 09:07 PM

#24

Hey Maurice, lookin' good.

Hang the frame near your furnace, if it's in the garage. It will dry it quick. Keeping it outside through wide temp swings with delay drying by weeks.

I was under the impression that it worked differently. I used the urethane paint for colorrite for the frame. I sprayed it over three fully dry coats of primer/sealer. I let that dry for two days. Then I clear coated it with several coats of rustoleum clear enamel.

My understanding is that the enamel does not really dry, it cures. It takes exposure to oxygen for the curing to occur. No heat will really speed up the curing process for enamel.

Or so I have always believed.

I did apply at least three coats, so I am thinking it really needs a couple of weeks to dry. Everything was done with a rattle can, so I'm thinking I should really be patient with it.

Anyone know if my understanding is correct? I am not formally trained or educated in paints.

Edited by mauricedorris, March 16, 2012 - 09:08 PM.


  • Krannie McKranface

Posted March 16, 2012 - 09:23 PM

#25

I was under the impression that it worked differently. I used the urethane paint for colorrite for the frame. I sprayed it over three fully dry coats of primer/sealer. I let that dry for two days. Then I clear coated it with several coats of rustoleum clear enamel.

My understanding is that the enamel does not really dry, it cures. It takes exposure to oxygen for the curing to occur. No heat will really speed up the curing process for enamel.

Or so I have always believed.

I did apply at least three coats, so I am thinking it really needs a couple of weeks to dry. Everything was done with a rattle can, so I'm thinking I should really be patient with it.

Anyone know if my understanding is correct? I am not formally trained or educated in paints.


Yes you are right, but I did not mean to be referring to the heat, but the lack of moisture.....

  • GlennR

Posted March 17, 2012 - 03:52 PM

#26

Looks great. You've really put a lot of work into doing it right.


I'm sure the paint will be good & cured by the time you get her back together. :thumbsup:

  • redhurricane

Posted March 18, 2012 - 07:45 AM

#27

Looks good, take lots of pics, I neglected to do so on my cosmetic rebuild a couple months ago.

My pics here:

http://s189.photobuc.../wr450 rebuild/

  • YZ450Hombre

Posted March 18, 2012 - 08:02 AM

#28

Looks good, take lots of pics, I neglected to do so on my cosmetic rebuild a couple months ago.

My pics here:

http://s189.photobuc...r450%20rebuild/

Very nice looking WR, I like those retro graphics on white plastic!

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 18, 2012 - 06:39 PM

#29

Yes you are right, but I did not mean to be referring to the heat, but the lack of moisture.....

Good point. My garage is dettached and I live in an old house with a furnace in the basement. The frame, which only has a faint paint smell at this point, is now in my basement near the two old school furnaces. The air is always dry down there!


Looks great. You've really put a lot of work into doing it right.


I'm sure the paint will be good & cured by the time you get her back together. :thumbsup:

Thanks... I'm taking my time and being patient. I've never much concerned myself with the appearance of my dirtbike before because its... well... a dirtbike! However, its been 7 years and its looks did not reflect how well I maintained it mechanically and how well it really runs.

This week, I'll clean the carb and cleanup the brake calipers a bit. Reassembly will probably start next saturday.


Looks good, take lots of pics, I neglected to do so on my cosmetic rebuild a couple months ago.

My pics here:

http://s189.photobuc...r450%20rebuild/


Documenting the process is sure keeping me honest. I'm sure that someone will make me aware of any steps that I miss.

Regarding the white plastic... I was very, very, very tempted to paint my frame black to give me the option of purchasing white plastic and doing what you did. However, I already have a new front and rear blue fenders. My gas tank is already blue as well and that would not have worked. That color change would have potentially cost me over $300.

I got the word last week that my ktm will be out of the shop this week after the motor rebuild. I am NOT in the mood to spend any more money on dirtbikes!

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 21, 2012 - 12:09 AM

#30

OK.. back to it. I am getting everything ready to start my re-assembly. But I figured that now would be as good a time as any to do a valve adjustment. Its been a few years since they needed any adjusting.

So I pull off the valve cover and start taking some measurements using my trusty feeler guage. My quick measurement found that the center intake and the left intake were out of spec. Surprisingly, they are loose. So... I have to now go through the process.

Posted Image

Looks like my cams are nice and lubed. I am however, concerned about some of the minor debris found in the middle of the intake cam. Looks like just a couple metal shavings. No need to panic, I just need to keep an eye on this during future valve adjustments.

Posted Image

With the valve buckets removed, I start trying to figure out what size shims are in each bucket. These are important notes to keep. Shims are damn near impossible to read, so I decide to simply measure them. Most of them measure out to be .073 inches, which is 1.85mm or better yet, its a 185 shim. Get it?

Here are my notes on the valves. Two are loose. This would be the second time I've adjusted the valves in 7 years. I do my math and figure out that I need to go one size bigger for the exhaust and two size bigger on the intake. I'll go pick up a 190 and a 195

Posted Image

OK then, tomorrow I am off to the dealership and hope that they have some parts. Anytime I go there and they have anything is a total shock.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Krannie McKranface

Posted March 21, 2012 - 07:41 AM

#31

Oil is way too dark......contaminated...

  • zibbit u2

Posted March 21, 2012 - 11:40 AM

#32

Agreed, I haven't seen oil that blackened in quite some time.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 21, 2012 - 12:32 PM

#33

OK, I thought so too.... please explain and educate me. What is the oil saying about my engine? I did have a couple of rides on that oil prior to the tear down. Maybe three rides totaling about 150-160 miles. That is the Rotella oil.

I suspect that my dynaring autoclutch may be the cause of some extra heat. My clutch fibers are just a bit discolored. I have no proof though. I am not wearing through the clutch plates. Am I thinking the right way?

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted March 21, 2012 - 12:42 PM

#34

OK, I thought so too.... please explain and educate me. What is the oil saying about my engine? I did have a couple of rides on that oil prior to the tear down. Maybe three rides totaling about 150-160 miles. That is the Rotella oil.

I suspect that my dynaring autoclutch may be the cause of some extra heat. My clutch fibers are just a bit discolored. I have no proof though. I am not wearing through the clutch plates. Am I thinking the right way?


Dyanarings slip a lot. You need to put in stiffer clutch springs for reliable operation. That's why I went to a Rekluse EXP system, and sold my Dynaring.

That oil is toast. Can't tell if it's burnt (smell) or just dirty (dust) or contaminated ( clutch fibers) from that pic.
In any case, if the cold oil at the top of the motor looks like that, I can't imagine what the oil at the bottom looks like.............

But no matter, you are putting in all new everything, right?? :thumbsup:

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 21, 2012 - 01:33 PM

#35

Dyanarings slip a lot. You need to put in stiffer clutch springs for reliable operation. That's why I went to a Rekluse EXP system, and sold my Dynaring.

That oil is toast. Can't tell if it's burnt (smell) or just dirty (dust) or contaminated ( clutch fibers) from that pic.
In any case, if the cold oil at the top of the motor looks like that, I can't imagine what the oil at the bottom looks like.............

But no matter, you are putting in all new everything, right?? :thumbsup:

Let share notes on this a bit.. I know you had your experiences. Maybe someone else can learn a bit.

At the time (last year) I bought two of these, one for each bike, rekluse had not yet released its redesigned exp 2.0 and I got two dynarings for the price of one rekluse pro. Then those guys closed up shop a couple months after my purchase. Go figure. Its still a good product.

Yes, the dyna rings do slip a lot, more than I like at times. Finding the correct engagement point is kinda tricky too. Too much gap and it slips, too little and its grabby and has an even harder time finding neutral. To top it off, I think that the measured gap between the pressure plate and top fiber plate changes just a little as the clutch warms and cools. I'm saying that the warmer clutch and hot engine makes it slip even more. There's just not enough clamping force, which is probably why you recommend the stiffer springs.

It was already paid for and its better to have it than to not have it, so learned to coexist with it and the extra heat it puts on my engine at times. First, I have to keep in engaged longer and harder, which means slightly more engine rpms. I think I accomplished this by going up 1 tooth on the rear sprocket. I'm now at 14/49 and I really should just go back to 14/50. I will get a stronger pull going up hill without having to fan the clutch on approach.

Second thing is that I completely abandoned their approach of using clutch cable adjuster to control the gap. Its a very sensitive adjustment. I ordered some shims from Yamaha and stack them on top of the throwout. I then use two opposing feeler guages (important) and adjusted the gap to be right in the middle of the range, which is 1.0 - 1.5mm. This has me running a little cooler and I'm not losing quite as much coolant as I was before.

I will definitely have to try those heavy duty clutch springs.

No matter what though, you cannot sit idle with a dynaring, not even with the clutch in. It still generates heat.

On my KTM though, the shim trick didn't work as well. So I ordered that creative little adjustable throwout. Then I tossed the thin and weak steel plates from revloc and used OEM steel plates. With the clutch stack being higher, I then had to order the clutch cover spacer/gasket from rekluse. It worked well. But.. the KTM is my race bike, so I am usually riding it aggressively and way the dynaring slips doesn't work for me in those conditions. I am not a wheelie guy, but on a 450 I should be able to use just the throttle to lighten the front wheel when blasting through whoops and choppy stuff. That slight delay (slippage) drove me nuts when I am racing. So, I now have installed a rekluse pro in the KTM. It is more tunable

I have not yet tried the exp 2.0 from rekluse, which I hear has much better bite at low rpm.

The dynarings are good, very good in fact. But they are for play rides, not racing or riding at a race pace. Its fine for my wr450 (dual sport, play bike) and I'll keep it till it fails, which will probably be never. The clutch plates are holding up. They get hot, but they hold up.

In the mean time, I'm going to keep an eye on that oil and maybe step up to something a little higher quality to handle the heat. Rotella is not great oil, but its adequate.

This is WAY off topic for this post, but in the spirit of sharing... these were my experiences and my observations. Surely people that are more experience at things have had different experiences.

Edited by mauricedorris, March 21, 2012 - 01:37 PM.


  • Krannie McKranface

Posted March 21, 2012 - 04:33 PM

#36

My experience:

The dynaring product is for fresh clutches with new hd springs, and no slow vertical single track.
Otherwise, it slips, slips, slips, even with no gap or 2.0mm gap. That's with a 289lb bike and a 278lb rider with full gear and spares.

I went through a set of their replacement metal plates, the ones with the notched side, in 3 hours. Burnt beyond belief.
After several attempts to get positive results, including new plates, new springs, different engagement springs, etc. Rekluse contacted me with an offer to replace the Dynaring with the new EXP ring for free, as long as I made an honest post in TT about my results.

All I have to say is, it's still in there. Still engages at 2500 rpm, never slips if I'm in the right gear, and is much more 'consistent' than the dynaring. I eventually went quicker engagement springs, and heavier wedges, and now it engages quicker, and at about 2200 rpm.

Now, an autoclutch is not good to have if you are playing 'hooligan' or 'johnny mx berm-buster'; the auto clutches make those experiences more frustrating than fun, but for everything else, the autoclutch works.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 29, 2012 - 10:07 AM

#37

OK... here is an update. Something I saw in the head doesn't sit well with me. I mentioned before about some debris I saw on the cams. When I was removing the shims, I could not get the buckets out. I had to get a socket and tap the inside of the journals because it had a small lip that prevented the bucket from being removed. Here is a picture. Notice the scored up cam journal.

My search on Thumpertalk has some well documented issues with the cam journals getting damaged, probably because of the excessively tight tolerances. Bad things can happen if I don't do something about this. I am removing the head and sending it to Engine Dynamics to be repaired. The cost to fix it is a whole lot cheaper than a new head.

See the pic below... It shows me having to use the socket to push back the lip over the shim bucket. But also take a look at the journal. Its what I am getting fixed. I guess that will take a couple of weeks.


Posted Image

Edited by mauricedorris, March 29, 2012 - 10:15 AM.


  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 29, 2012 - 10:35 AM

#38

So... while the head is off to get repaired, lets install those bearing races into the frame. Again, I have never taken it to a shop. I just use tools in my possession and I normally get them installed.

Here are the races and bearings. Obviously, the first bearing is already installed on the lower triple clamp. The thing to remember here is that the bearings and races are not the same. You must match the top with the top and the bottom with the bottom.. In my case, the thicker race fit on the bottom bearing. So I installed it into the frame using my hammer and a socket. My approach is to tap it lightly and repeatedly with a hammer til it goes in. Trust me, that race is harder than you hammer. It won't hurt it if you are careful.

Pics of the races and remaining bearing. Notice the thicker one which goes on the bottom.
Posted Image


Then I used my hammer to lightly tap it into place. Not hard blows, just taps. Be patient and it will start to go in. Keep taping
Posted Image

After that, use a socket, keep tapping on the edge of the race and it will drop all the way down into the head.

Posted Image

Then flip the frame over and do the other side. You'll have your races installed. Elapsed time: 11 mins.

Posted Image

Edited by mauricedorris, March 29, 2012 - 10:36 AM.


  • NP4M

Posted March 29, 2012 - 11:16 AM

#39

Hold up, you work on your own bike???

A couple things to think about.

a) chase the threads on the frame with a tap to clean out any burrs. Oh, wait....

:thumbsup: a tow hook for Big Bear next year.

Seriously, you sent the head out? Are we ever going to ride again? I need GPS tracks!

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted March 29, 2012 - 12:48 PM

#40

Hold up, you work on your own bike???

A couple things to think about.

a) chase the threads on the frame with a tap to clean out any burrs. Oh, wait....

:thumbsup: a tow hook for Big Bear next year.

Seriously, you sent the head out? Are we ever going to ride again? I need GPS tracks!

Yeah, I work on my own bike. I am pretty good with the 4 strokes. Its those complicated 2 strokes that I can't really figure out.

Head is sitting in a box waiting to be shipped. Will take at least two weeks. Frame is in the back of the Yukon to take to a welder to fix the broken insert and to ruin my paint job. Then I get to start all over.

This has officially turned into a "project". Any hope I have of riding in the near future rests on the still busted KTM. Go figure...

Edited by mauricedorris, March 29, 2012 - 12:49 PM.





 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.