WR Lighting



35 replies to this topic
  • Gadsen

Posted October 08, 2003 - 07:55 PM

#21

...I have access to the materials and equipment needed to rewind/modify one, I'm just not sure exactly what to do. I would like to upsize mine but do not know where to start.

:devil:'Ya never know, maybe my Mad Scientist buddies and I could get one up to 300-400 watts. I could run all my gadgets some big baja headlights, hand warmers, butt warmer...


Heck, maybe just kidding, but its doable. I used to work for an alternator rebuilder for 4 years, did rewind a stator for a buddy of mines bike. You need to know the wire size and the number of wraps. For moure output, you need larger wire, more wraps. Catch 22, usually larger wire, you run out of room before you get more wraps. Too little wraps or too large a wire will result in low putput at idle. And if you do manage to get enough wraps, and the output is greatly increases, alond with the demand, then you may have an overheating problem. Some of these are cooled in engine oil or no assit in cooling at all, so burning up is possible. Oh, when you wrap the poles, it goes CC, then CCW, CW, CCW, ie north, south, north, south poles.

  • matt_patton

Posted December 13, 2004 - 03:40 PM

#22

if I may resurrect this thread... Anybody used aftermarket alternators like from e-line that put out 200W?

  • RADRick

Posted December 13, 2004 - 08:41 PM

#23

Yeah that's right. Why does the stock headlight struggle at low rpms? there should be plenty of juice? It seems that I need to be above 4000 rpm to get the stock light to maximum brightness. :cry:


The difference is that on the WR the light is powered by the stator output, not the battery. Hence, bulb output is RPM dependent. On the TTR-250, the lighting circuit is fed directly from the battery so headlight output is constant. Unfortunately, the TTR requires a larger battery to prevent starvation since the lights will draw the same amount of power whether at idle or at speed. Personally, I like the constant output of the TTR-250 over the dim-bright of the WR, and being able to use the light without having the engine running. But if it meant a bigger battery on the WR it would be a negative. Since the TTR-250 is button start only, the bigger battery is probably a must to make sure there's enough reserve power for both the lights and starter. Since the WR only needs the battery for starting and has the kicker for backup, a smaller battery gets the job done.

RADRick
www.mcjournalist.com

  • RADRick

Posted December 13, 2004 - 08:53 PM

#24

Heck, maybe just kidding, but its doable. You need to know the wire size and the number of wraps. For moure output, you need larger wire, more wraps. Catch 22, usually larger wire, you run out of room before you get more wraps. Too little wraps or too large a wire will result in low putput at idle. And if you do manage to get enough wraps, and the output is greatly increases, alond with the demand, then you may have an overheating problem. Some of these are cooled in engine oil or no assit in cooling at all, so burning up is possible.


More important is the strain a larger stator will put on the engine. Electricity is generated by creating a magnetic field. The higher the output, the stronger the magnetic field or mechanical resistance. Since the magnets surrounding the stator are driven by the engine, increasing the stator output will increase the power needed to spin the engine resulting in a drop in horsepower. That's why drag racers have no charging systems on their vehicles. The horsepower needed to drive them is better off used for performance. Dirt bike manufacturers spec their stators very close to maximum need in order to put no more mechanical resistance on the engine than is necessary.

RADRick
www.mcjournalist.com

  • Gadsen

Posted December 13, 2004 - 09:07 PM

#25

Also, consider replacing the rear tail lamp bulb with an LED replacement. This will free up some extra current for the headlamp. I use an LED in my WR450F. Much more durable to boot!

  • bikepilot

Posted December 13, 2004 - 10:16 PM

#26

Correct me if I'm wrong, but this is the way I understand it. The WR stator has one output that is rectified to DC and regulated for jobs like charging the battery and running the sensitive electronic equipment (ignition system...). The other output is just left as an AC line to run lights, but without the regulator, it can handle the current draw, but does so at the expense of voltage output. Hence, no matter what the wattage of bulb, the light will be dimmer until the stator can produce the necessary volts ( a direct function of RPM ). How did I do?

  • matt_patton

Posted December 14, 2004 - 05:13 AM

#27

not to mention most stators are tuned to arrive at 100% efficiency somewhere in the middle of hte rev band. I was surprised not to see the specs in the Yam manual but my Kawi for example gets 100% efficiency at 5000 RPM. Anything higher than that doesn't generate any more power.

Ok, so what size and where are you WR guys mounting batts? I need one for my WR400.

  • RichBaker

Posted December 14, 2004 - 04:21 PM

#28

Correct me if I'm wrong, but this is the way I understand it. The WR stator has one output that is rectified to DC and regulated for jobs like charging the battery and running the sensitive electronic equipment (ignition system...). The other output is just left as an AC line to run lights, but without the regulator, it can handle the current draw, but does so at the expense of voltage output. Hence, no matter what the wattage of bulb, the light will be dimmer until the stator can produce the necessary volts ( a direct function of RPM ). How did I do?

Close, but there IS an AC regulator....otherwise we'd blow bulbs all day long. :cry:

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  • wr_power

Posted December 14, 2004 - 06:43 PM

#29

I will have to try this bulb on my next 24 hour GP. Good light a must! Thanks for the info.

  • RADRick

Posted December 14, 2004 - 08:56 PM

#30

Correct me if I'm wrong, but this is the way I understand it. The WR stator has one output that is rectified to DC and regulated for jobs like charging the battery and running the sensitive electronic equipment (ignition system...). The other output is just left as an AC line to run lights, but without the regulator, it can handle the current draw, but does so at the expense of voltage output. Hence, no matter what the wattage of bulb, the light will be dimmer until the stator can produce the necessary volts ( a direct function of RPM ). How did I do?


All devices are run on regulated and rectified DC. AC would require two wires to every device and would not allow common grounding to the frame. Also, you wouldn't be able to change a taillight with something you pick up at the auto parts store. An AC bulb requires higher voltage to produce the same candlepower as a 12V DC bulb and would generate more heat. Stator-produced AC is also very dirty electrically and having both AC and DC powered circuits could cause noise-related problems, particularly with CDI ignitions.

RADRick
www.mcjournalist.com

  • Gadsen

Posted December 14, 2004 - 09:17 PM

#31

All devices are run on regulated and rectified DC. AC would require two wires to every device and would not allow common grounding to the frame. Also, you wouldn't be able to change a taillight with something you pick up at the auto parts store. An AC bulb requires higher voltage to produce the same candlepower as a 12V DC bulb and would generate more heat. Stator-produced AC is also very dirty electrically and having both AC and DC powered circuits could cause noise-related problems, particularly with CDI ignitions.

RADRick
www.mcjournalist.com


The WR's headlamps and tail lamps do run off of AC voltage from a seperate lighting coil. It may be regulated, but its not rectified. And they do not use the chassis as a ground. As for dirty AC, yes, its because its only single phase. If you add a LED tail lamp, this will convert that circuit to half wave recitfied DC and on a single phase, real dirty. The standard 12V DC bulbs will work just fine on AC.

  • OrionEngineer

Posted December 14, 2004 - 10:52 PM

#32

I have a question about LED tail lights since this post touched on them briefly. I converted my tail to LED, added some for brake and also added some and modified the lens to light up my license plate. This set up worked great until I went riding some crazy trails and the vibration broke the LED's off their leads. They are the large (10mm) ones and part of the problem is that I used the long leads to hold them off the board so I could aim them at my plate. Now to my question finally... Is there some sort of resin or something I can encase the whole board/LED set up in to keep this from happening again? Any other ideas? Other than this, the whole thing works really well. Thanks in advance.

  • Hamish

Posted December 15, 2004 - 04:18 AM

#33

any exoxy resin is fine. Just make sure you mix it accurately because this stuff gets hot whilst curing, and if you add too much hardner it will melt things. Believe me, I've been there :cry:

  • PumpkinHumper

Posted December 15, 2004 - 05:32 AM

#34

I just poked my nose in my stock light assembly and noticed the wiring isn't very heavy. Are you pulling your 100 Watts from the stock front headlight connector, or does the kit give you new wire to connect back up the line a ways.

P/V=I
100W/12V ~= 9 amps. Anybody have any problems with this, or know of any better places to connect extra power to?


I upgraded the stock wires on the BLitz to some heavier ones that I got from a local Home lighting store. The bulbs in the Blitz are MR-16 low voltage bulbs typicaly found in home lighting. There was no kit for the 50w bulbs and wire. I just went to Home Depot and bought the stuff.

My blitz is on a YZ400 w/ wr stator. So I have a somewhat custom kit. I pieced it all together myself.

It does dim at idle. But as soon as your moving it is at full brightness. RPM for max lighting is about equal to the RPM your bike runs when the choke is on. So its not all that high. Ya just got to remember to keep the rpm up coming into a corner w/ clutch in or the light goes away.

  • RichBaker

Posted December 15, 2004 - 05:32 PM

#35

If you are talking about 03 and newer WRs, you're wrong....the lights are run on regulated AC......check the schematic.

All devices are run on regulated and rectified DC. AC would require two wires to every device and would not allow common grounding to the frame. Also, you wouldn't be able to change a taillight with something you pick up at the auto parts store. An AC bulb requires higher voltage to produce the same candlepower as a 12V DC bulb and would generate more heat. Stator-produced AC is also very dirty electrically and having both AC and DC powered circuits could cause noise-related problems, particularly with CDI ignitions.

RADRick
www.mcjournalist.com



  • matt_patton

Posted December 22, 2004 - 07:03 AM

#36

can I get a pic of the regulator/rectifier on a 03+ WR450? I need to know what kind of hookup I'm looking at to retro into my WR400.




 
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