changing bearings in talon hub: removing center sleeve


5 replies to this topic
  • ams14

Posted November 17, 2011 - 12:06 PM

#1

06 yz450 talon hub.

Anyone know how to get the center adapter sleeve out of a talon hub so i can put new bearings in? From what I understand, the sleeve that runs through the center of the hub (inside the bearing ID) adapts the axle from 22mm to 25mm (or something like that).

It appears to be one piece, only thing i can think of is to drive it out with a hammer?

I also posted on the SUMO forum, but then thought it was maybe more of a yamaha specific question.

thanks!

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2011 - 12:59 PM

#2

It's a Talon specific question. Talon hubs are fabbed in three basic parts; the two outside flanges and the center of the hub. The same center is used for most applications by bolting the correct outer flanges onto it. The same wheel bearings are then used for most things by making the bearings larger than any axle they will use, and matching them to the axle with a stepped center spacer/sleeve piece.

In most OEM hubs, you have to push the center piece far enough off center that you can get a bite on the inner race of one bearing to drive it out. Then the center falls free and the opposing bearing can be removed.

But with the Talons, the center spacer/sleeve can't be off centered, so it needs to be drive out one side with the bearing. Obviously, you don't want to mushroom the end of the sleeve, so the ideal tool for the job would be a bearing driver a half millimeter smaller than the axle that has a step on it to a half mill smaller than the bearing bore. Next best is a square cut tube or rod that will just fit through the center of the bearing. Carefully warming the bearing pocket on the side opposite the one you are working from will help, too.

If the sleeve gets a little beat up, file the damage away until the axle will slip through and the sleeve can be reinserted into the bearing. The squareness of the ends of the sleeve is not so important.

  • ams14

Posted November 17, 2011 - 01:36 PM

#3

Think I got it, thanks Gray!

In light of this, maybe the bearings are OK as is? When inspecting, I noticed that it was pretty hard to turn the spacer/sleeve (i thought it should rotate a lot more freely). For example, I couldn't rotate with my hands, had to grab the spacer end with a pair of plyers to get to rotate, which led me to believe the bearings were shot, but now i'm wondering if maybe they are always this hard to rotate with this spacer/sleeve setup?. Any opinion?

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  • KJ790

Posted November 17, 2011 - 01:45 PM

#4

It's a Talon specific question. Talon hubs are fabbed in three basic parts; the two outside flanges and the center of the hub. The same center is used for most applications by bolting the correct outer flanges onto it. The same wheel bearings are then used for most things by making the bearings larger than any axle they will use, and matching them to the axle with a stepped center spacer/sleeve piece.

In most OEM hubs, you have to push the center piece far enough off center that you can get a bite on the inner race of one bearing to drive it out. Then the center falls free and the opposing bearing can be removed.

But with the Talons, the center spacer/sleeve can't be off centered, so it needs to be drive out one side with the bearing. Obviously, you don't want to mushroom the end of the sleeve, so the ideal tool for the job would be a bearing driver a half millimeter smaller than the axle that has a step on it to a half mill smaller than the bearing bore. Next best is a square cut tube or rod that will just fit through the center of the bearing. Carefully warming the bearing pocket on the side opposite the one you are working from will help, too.

If the sleeve gets a little beat up, file the damage away until the axle will slip through and the sleeve can be reinserted into the bearing. The squareness of the ends of the sleeve is not so important.


You are thinking Excel Pro Series hubs Gray, Talon hubs are bike specific and are one piece like OEM hubs. Talon does use a unique (and difficult to change) bearing set up on their hubs. The center spacer has a lip on it inside the bearings, so to get it out you have to press it out, which will in turn push one of the bearings out of the hub. Here is the rear bearing, seal, and specer set up for a talon hub that I used to have:

Posted Image

  • grayracer513

Posted November 17, 2011 - 02:25 PM

#5

You are thinking Excel Pro Series hubs Gray, Talon hubs are bike specific and are one piece like OEM hubs.

Ah, I had that part of it mixed up between them. The techniques I described were for a bearing setup like the one you showed though, so it will work. The thinner the walls of the sleeve, the more important a properly fitting driver is, though.

  • ams14

Posted November 17, 2011 - 03:48 PM

#6

Thanks, that is a great picture, I've been all over the internet and haven't seen a pic or a diagram till now!





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