Slow kid 2 stroke



12 replies to this topic
  • Shawbridge Husky

Posted July 09, 2001 - 04:53 AM

#1

My neighbours' 17 year old kid has a '96 RM250. This kid can't seem to do anything for himself and has lazy habits. As I am single I would like to ask you dad's out there what I could do to help make this kid more responsable. His own Dad seem to have run out of patience and maybe that is the root of the problem. I must of shown this kid at least two dozen times how to start his bike or even featther the clutch but can't seem to get the gist of it. Help if you can!

  • WR_Jason

Posted July 09, 2001 - 08:54 AM

#2

I dont know what is a worse idea, learning to ride on a GSXR 750 or a RM 250. Neither bike is for beginners that have never ridden. At least the RM keeps people from getting hurt by not letting them start it if they dont know what they are doing. The GSXR will let you turn the key and hit the button before escorting you into the nearest gaurd rail.
A RM 250 is a pretty intimading bike for a beginner. I would advise him to trade it for an older or more mellow bike (Non MX). I have trained sevral riders (including my mom and girlfriend)on late 70s early 80s trail bikes in the 125cc to 185cc range. They are EASY to start and you can practicly just let go of the clutch in 1st gear and the bikes wont stall. The seats are nice and low and they dont scare people off.

  • Scott_F

Posted July 09, 2001 - 09:32 PM

#3

OTOH, I would say that a 17 year old boy should easily be able to learn how to start a bike, and take off in first gear. If he can't master those things in one day, maybe he shouldn't try to ride. After all, 8-10 year olds learn this to ride KX60's.

  • teamtoxic

Posted July 09, 2001 - 11:27 AM

#4

<font color="navy">My first bike was a JR50, a present for my 3rd birthday. I'm 16 now and on a 426. I think any kid 17 yrs old should be able to start an RM250; easily.
If it really is that big of a problem, he should get a 125. He'll only get a year out of a 125 because he'll feel the need for more <u>power</u>! I certainly did!


------------------
~YaMaHaYzFoUrTwOsIx~

  • Shawbridge Husky

Posted July 09, 2001 - 11:36 AM

#5

Thanks for your input. I should re-phrase though :
A) This guy just wants to ride but does not seem to be willing to do all the work that goes with it such as learning to do maintenance himself, keeping his work area organized, training, etc. That's what I meant by lazy.

:D Yes I agree, he has too much bike to start with! He can't mountain bike let alone ride under power through technical sections. Like a lot of youths he sees freestyle videos and plays MX computer games, thereby feeling that he has aquired some type of skill and that he will cream us older geezers on our 4 strokes. :)

I was just wondering if any of the dads out there know of kids that think along these lines and how they deal with it.

Team Toxic, yes he should have gotten a 125 to start. He'll admit that much.
B.T.W. I've seen your posts in the past and must say you have an entrepeneurial spirit! Keep it up!

[This message has been edited by Hugh LePage (edited 07-09-2001).]

  • WR_Jason

Posted July 09, 2001 - 12:28 PM

#6

Yhea, I know a kid like that. He is 17 and has been riding for a while and goes out and gets a brand new Yz. Thats ok except its a YZ 80!!! He is to scared to get a 125 but call the 80 a POS when it wont rip up hills. Plus, he wont wrench on even an air filter! So he is broke cause he buys all kinds of stupid stuff like grafics and chrome helmet visiors when he knows his bike needs work, and wont even change his own oil. I tried to show him how to fix his own bike one time, and when I turend around to get a tool he was over stuffing his face with jolly ranchers! He just dose not want to learn. So half the people we go riding with hate him because they did some stupid work for him, and he never paid them! Every one has offered to show him, but he just says, naaa Ill pay you to do it. That and he is a bit of a smartass too.
Anyway, as mentioned above, ridin aint for everyone. If he wants to ride without wrenching, best stick to a brand new street bike. A SLOW ONE :) .

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  • DaveJ

Posted July 09, 2001 - 01:23 PM

#7

This doesn't sound like it's an issue of the type of bike as it is a difference in riders, (and personalities).

In other words, he's not you. And if you try to make him you, expect failure.

Just let him go and make sure he at least wears a helmet and a good set of boots. Once he sees a purpose in all this, he’ll want to improve. That your cue.

DaveJ

  • MXOldtimer

Posted July 09, 2001 - 02:53 PM

#8

Just sounds like a typical spoiled teenager to me.

Doug

  • Boit

Posted July 10, 2001 - 03:47 PM

#9

Being the neighborhood dirtbike.MX guy, a lot of kids and teenagers have stopped by for help with their machines. I do a quick visual examination of their bikes and determine if I'm wasting my time working on a bike that will just be terribly abused as soon as I finish doing whatever it is that needs doing at the time. I'll help them once, but I also explain that they need not bother me again if they aren't willing to do a modicum of maintenance. Then, I show them how the chain is dry and slack, the air filter is filthy, the spokes are loose, the suspension pivot points squeak from lack of grease...etc. If one of the kids shows an interest in learning how to take care of these items, I'll work with him. Unfortunately, I haven't found a single one who showed the slightest motivation to do a damn thing for himself.
Last Friday, a kid came flying down the street on his XR100. . . at least 50mph on a neighborhood street with a 25 mph limit. A little while later, as I rode my Riva down the street, he was amusing his friends with a burnout. He came by Saturday evening to see if I would change his rear tire. I asked him why change the tire just to do a burnout and wear the damn thing down so quick? I told him that I wasn't about to waste my time working on his bike just to watch him treat it like that. When I asked him when the last time was that he had changed his oil, he just shrugged. It probably ticked him off when I added that I don't want to touch his bike because I don't like working on junk....or soon-to-be junk. He's a real smartass so it bothers me none that he's miffed at me.

  • Mook

Posted July 11, 2001 - 07:55 PM

#10

Originally posted by Hugh LePage:
Thanks for your input. I should re-phrase though :
A) This guy just wants to ride but does not seem to be willing to do all the work that goes with it such as learning to do maintenance himself, keeping his work area organized, training, etc. That's what I meant by lazy.

:D Yes I agree, he has too much bike to start with! He can't mountain bike let alone ride under power through technical sections. Like a lot of youths he sees freestyle videos and plays MX computer games, thereby feeling that he has aquired some type of skill and that he will cream us older geezers on our 4 strokes. :)

I was just wondering if any of the dads out there know of kids that think along these lines and how they deal with it.

Team Toxic, yes he should have gotten a 125 to start. He'll admit that much.
B.T.W. I've seen your posts in the past and must say you have an entrepeneurial spirit! Keep it up!

[This message has been edited by Hugh LePage (edited 07-09-2001).]


Here is a thought from a Dad of a 7 year old. I am 28 so I am as close to being a teenager as my son is. But this may help. The other posts are right. this kid will not do anything that he does not WANT to do. So if he really wants to ride then take him to ride and teach him, and break it down into repetitive easy steps. But make a trade, a little at a time. If he wants to go learn to ride saturday, tell him he has to clean the air filter or change the oil before the bike gets on the trailer. Don't budge unless he does his part of the deal. Let him know that he is responsible for getting it done by having him feel the consequence of getting it done or not (he can't blame it on you). Also, attention spans are non-existant with teens, so make him DO the work. If you pull out the tools and "show" him he will be stuffing jolly ranchers in his face as soon as you blink. You will have to be concise and very patient though because, obviously, he won't be as proficient as you. Make him use the manual (read it) and help him pick all his tools/materials out before hand so he sees that some organization makes it quick and easy.

well, you asked.

mike

[This message has been edited by Mook (edited 07-11-2001).]

  • Boit

Posted July 11, 2001 - 08:06 PM

#11

Mook: Geez...I can't find a single fault with your advice. That's incredibly patient and insightful. You are a great Dad.. :)

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted December 01, 2001 - 07:56 AM

#12

Yes that is great advice, considering you raise your kid that way. But starting fresh with a 17 year old is a whole other story. Somtimes I will have my 9 year old boy do something and then I catch myself correcting everything he does, that makes me feel like #@$!!@. Thats the way my dad was with me. I'am trying to learn to let him do things on his own and build some confidence, It's a struggle, but we will get there.

[ December 01, 2001: Message edited by: whoyaChrisH ]

  • Mike_in_Silicon_valley

Posted December 01, 2001 - 10:13 PM

#13

You need to clearly state what you expect of him. The problems start when you positively reinforce bad behavior. Don't give him the good stuff regardless of his behavior. No maintenance = no riding, etc. You don't have to make it like "Stalag 13" but by not doing it you are really doing him a disservice. Being lazy will only hurt him in life and lord knows we have enough lazy people in this world. I have these same issues with my own children periodically. One thing I have noticed about dirtbikers is that most will give you the shirt off their backs. In this case it is the wrong thing to do.

Mike





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