Link Arm Bearing Removal


7 replies to this topic
  • Wiz636

Posted August 26, 2011 - 05:03 PM

#1

Replacing linkage bearings on my '08 and was able to remove them with no problem from the 'dog bone' (or whatever it's called) using a piece of all-thread and some washers and sockets.

However, the bearings on the link arm are not budging and it makes me wonder if they can't be pressed all the way through?

Any tips or insight?

  • grayracer513

Posted August 26, 2011 - 05:49 PM

#2

I haven't done one of the late ones. If there's a gap between the bearings, scratch at it to see if it's aluminum. If so, it could be that there's a step between them, and the bearing have to be removed out each side. Seems I remember something about such a thing being mentioned here.

  • Wiz636

Posted August 27, 2011 - 12:00 AM

#3

After looking at it (without fully cleaning the grease out yet, and I can't find my glasses) it looks as though there is a step in there.

That said, and assuming there is, how the heck do I get them out? Am I going to have to take the pins out and try to cut the races?

  • APlusAutoParts

Posted August 27, 2011 - 05:52 AM

#4

i just did the bearings on my 2010 yz the 2 bearings that go into the connecting rod (u shaped piece) have to be pulled out the is a step that prevents them from going through like all the other pieces of the rear bearings. I learned that the hard way there is a special tool that pulls them out.

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  • grayracer513

Posted August 27, 2011 - 08:53 AM

#5

You can heat the link to 250 ℉ and try to catch the inner edge with a cape chisel, strip the bearings and use the same tool on the inside of the outer edge, or if you have an acetylene torch, are skilled with it, and are a little bit bold, you can do this:

Leave the link cold to start with and wrap it in a wet cloth. Strip the bearings out and wipe out most of the grease. Using the torch, heat a single spot on the inside surface of the outer race bright red quickly. Use a flame big enough to heat the steel quickly, but not too big as to throw an excess of heat around the part. As soon as you get the spot red, expand the spot into a red line along the length of the bearing shell. The get out of it.

The idea is to heat the steel so quickly that it can't overheat the aluminum because of how rapidly AL absorbs heat throughout its whole mass and transfers it away. The bearing will have become much looser in the bore, and can be easily removed in most cases.

It's a great trick, used it many times. Obvious hazards. Wear gloves, use caution.

  • eazrider

Posted August 28, 2011 - 06:59 PM

#6

i just did the bearings on my 2010 yz the 2 bearings that go into the connecting rod (u shaped piece) have to be pulled out the is a step that prevents them from going through like all the other pieces of the rear bearings. I learned that the hard way there is a special tool that pulls them out.

Would it make sense to machine the step out for future maintenance..? Must be a reason for it, but it isn't clear....:)

  • YamaLink

Posted August 30, 2011 - 06:19 AM

#7

Maybe it's too early in the morn for me but after rereading your post you are trying to get the bearings out of the rocker, the boomerang looking thing?

  • Wiz636

Posted August 30, 2011 - 06:33 PM

#8

Maybe it's too early in the morn for me but after rereading your post you are trying to get the bearings out of the rocker, the boomerang looking thing?


No, the connecting rod might be what it is called. The piece that goes from the frame to the boomerang looking thing...





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